Natural Sciences

102 Baker Building
Phone 216-368-2928; Fax 216-368-4718
Joanne Westin, Director

Undergraduate Programs

MAJOR

The natural sciences major is an interdepartmental science program that leads to the Bachelor of Arts degree. It is intended to serve students whose interests and objectives call for a major in the humanities or social sciences that is accompanied by broad background in the natural sciences; e.g. history and philosophy of science and technology. Natural sciences may be taken only as a second major. The student also must declare and complete a major in one of the humanities or social sciences, except for the program in gerontological studies.

The program requires a minimum of 50 semester hours of work in natural sciences and mathematics. The departments included in the major are astronomy, biology, chemistry, geological sciences, and physics. The student must complete a minimum of 20 hours in one of the departments, a minimum of 8 hours each in two other of these departments, and 3 hours each in the remaining two departments. In addition, all natural sciences majors must complete MATH 125 and 126 or higher-level courses in mathematics. The courses selected in each of these departments must generally be courses that also satisfy major or related course requirements of an existing science major (though ASTR 201-202 is acceptable).

MINOR

A minor is achieved through completion of the requirements specified below for any four of the five departments listed.

Biology
Any two of BIOL 214, 215, 216

Chemistry
Completion of one of the following sequences:

CHEM 105, 106, 113

or

CHEM 111, 113, ENGR 145

Geological Sciences
Any one of GEOL 101, 110, 115 or 117;

and GEOL 119; and one other GEOL course.

Mathematics
Completion of one of the following sequences:

MATH 125, 126

or

MATH 121, 122

Physics
Completion of one of the following sequences:

PHYS 115, 116

or

PHYS 121, 122, 221

Department of Nutrition

2123 Abington Road, Room 201
Phone 368-2440; Fax 368-6644
Website: http://www.cwru.edu/med/nutrition/home/html
Henri Brunengraber, Chair

The department’s focus is on human nutrition and the application of the science of nutrition to the maintenance and improvement of health. Undergraduate programs are designed for students interested in nutritional biochemistry and metabolism, molecular nutrition, professional study in dietetics, public health nutrition, medicine, dentistry or nursing. Graduate programs emphasize dietetics, public health nutrition, nutritional biochemistry and molecular nutrition.

The Department of Nutrition offers programs leading to the following: Bachelor of Science degree in Nutrition, Bachelor of Arts degree in Nutrition, Bachelor of Arts degree in Nutritional Biochemistry and Metabolism, Bachelor of Science degree in Nutritional Biochemistry and Metabolism, Master of Science degree in Nutrition, Master of Science degree in Public Health Nutrition, and Doctor of Philosophy degree. A nutrition minor is available. Specialty programs are available in areas such as maternal and child nutrition or gerontology. The specialty is in addition to the basic graduate degree.

Special announcements describing the various programs and providing additional information are available from the department.

FACULTY

Henri Brunengraber, M.D., Ph.D. (Universite de Liege)
Professor and Chair of Department

Edith Lerner, Ph.D. (University of Wisconsin _ Madison)
Associate Professor and Vice_Chair of Department

Hope Barkoukis, Ph.D. (Case Western Reserve University)
Assistant Professor

Margaret M. Cicirella, M.A.,M.S. (Case Western Reserve University)
Instructor

Paul Ernsberger, Ph.D. (Northwestern University)
Associate Professor

Karen M. Fiedler, Ph.D. (University of Tennessee)
Associate Professor

Maria Hatzoglou, Ph.D. (University of Athens)
Associate Professor

Takhir Kasumov, Ph.D. (Moscow State)
Instructor

Mary Beth Kavanagh, M.S, (Case Western Reserve University)
Instructor

Janos Kerner, Ph.D. (Hungarian Academy of Sciences)
Assistant Professor

Jane Korsberg, M.S. (Case Western Reserve University)
Instructor

Duna Massillon, Ph.D. (Montreal)
Assistant Professor

Laura Nagy, Ph.D. (University of California-Berkeley)
Associate Professor

Patricia Papsidero, M.S. (Case Western Reserve University)
Instructor

Isabel M. Parraga, Ph.D. (Case Western Reserve University)
Associate Professor

Stephen Previs, Ph.D. (Case Western Reserve University)
Assistant Professor

Kou-Yi Tserng, Ph.D. (Illinois at Chicago)
Associate Professor

ASSOCIATE FACULTY

Secondary Appointments

Saul Genuth, M.D. (Case Western Reserve University)
Professor

Richard W. Hanson, Ph.D. (Brown University)
Professor

Douglas S. Kerr, M.D., Ph.D. (Case Western Reserve University)
Professor

John Kirwan, Ph.D. (Ball State)
Associate Professor

Bernard Landau, Ph.D., M.D. (Harvard)
Professor

William Stanley, Ph.D. (University of California-Berkeley)
Assistant Professor

Anthony Tavill, M.D. (Manchester-England)
Professor

ADJUNCT/CLINICAL APPOINTMENTS

Phyllis Allen, M.S. (Case Western Reserve University)
Adjunct Instructor

Kimberly Altman, M.P.H. (Case Western Reserve University)
Adjunct Instructor

Judith Anderson, Dr. Ph. (North Carolina)
Adjunct Instructor

Nancy Arnold, B.S. (Ohio University)
Adjunct Instructor

Johanna Asarian-Anderson, M.P.H. (University of California -Los Angeles)
Adjunct Instructor

Joan Atkinson, M.S. (Case Western Reserve University
Adjunct Instructor

Anika Avery-Grant, M.S. (Case Western Reserve University)
Adjunct Instructor

Dolores Badar, M.P.H. (Case Western Reserve University)
Adjunct Instructor

Mary Jo Berry, B.S. (Kent State University)
Adjunct Instructor

Cynthia Blackburn, M.S. (Kent State University)
Adjunct Instructor

Josephine Ann Cialone, M.S. (Case Western Reserve University)
Adjunct Instructor

Janice Davis, M.S. (Case Western Reserve University)
Adjunct Instructor

Sharon B. Doughten, M.S. (Kent State University)
Adjunct Instructor

Diane Foreman-Peck, M.P.H. (University of Berkeley, California)
Adjunct Instructor

Evangeline Fowler, M.S. (Case Western Reserve University)
Adjunct Instructor

Lorna Fuller, M.S. (Kent State University)
Adjunct Instructor

Brenda Garritson, M.S. (Texas Womenís University)
Adjunct Instructor

Susanne Gregory, M.P.H. (University of Minnesota)
Adjunct Instructor

Sharon Groh-Wargo, Ph.D. (Case Western Reserve University)
Adjunct Instructor

Cathy Hastings, M.P.H. ( South Florida)
Adjunct Instructor

Claire Hughes, Dr.PH (University of Hawaii)
Adjunct Instructor

Ryan Karam, B.S. (University of Akron)
Adjunct Instructor

Natalia Kliszczuk-Smolio, B.S. (University of Cincinnati)
Adjunct Instructor

Richard Koletsky, M.D.
Assistant Clinical Professor

Janet Kramer, M.P.H. (New York University)
Adjunct Instructor

Perri Kushan, B.S. (University of Akron)
Adjunct Instructor

Willie L. Lee, M.S. (University of Michigan)
Adjunct Instructor

Mary A. McGuckin, M.S. (Case Western Reserve University)
Adjunct Instructor

Anita Martin, M.P.H. (University of North Carolina)
Adjunct Instructor

Linda Novak-Eedy, B.S. (Bowling Green State University)
Adjunct Instructor

Punam Ohri-Vashaspati, Ph.D. (Tufts University)
Adjunct Instructor

Ermin Olive, M.S. (University of Puerto Rico)
Adjunct Instructor

Ling Patty, B.S. (College of St. Scholastica)
Adjunct Instructor

Barbara Pryor, M.S. (Ohio State University)
Adjunct Instructor

Anne Raguso, Ph.D. (Case Western Reserve University)
Adjunct Assistant Professor

Sharon Schwartz, M.S. (Indiana University School of Medicine)
Adjunct Instructor

Ruth Shrock, M.S. (Ohio State University)
Adjunct Instructor

Donna Skoda, M.S. (Case Western Reserve University)
Adjunct Instructor

Sara Snow, M.S. (Case Western Reserve University)
Adjunct Instructor

Lura Beth Spinks, M.S. (Ohio State University)
Adjunct Instructor

Virginia Stiver, M.S. (University of Tennessee)
Adjunct Instructor

Margaret Tate, M.S. (Colorado State)
Adjunct Instructor

Anita Ullman, M.S. (Case Western Reserve University)
Adjunct Instructor

Marisa Warrix, M.A. (Kent State University)
Adjunct Instructor

Diane Ohama Yates, B.S. (Hawaii)
Adjunct Instructor

Mary Zyga, B.S. (Ohio State University)
Adjunct Instructor

Undergraduate Programs

MAJOR PROGRAMS

The undergraduate degree in nutrition is appropriate for students who wish to: (1) pursue graduate programs in nutritional biochemistry, molecular nutrition, dietetics, public health nutrition or other biomedical sciences; (2) enter professional schools of dentistry, medicine, or nursing; (3) apply to dietetic internships or approved experience programs in order to prepare for the professional practice of dietetics; (4) pursue technical careers in the food or pharmaceutical industry. This major offers flexibility in course selection within a framework of general program requirements. The selection of courses depends on the student’s choice of emphasis. Students wishing to qualify for admission to professional or graduate programs need to include specific courses considered prerequisites for admission. Students interested in applying to dietetic internships must meet specific course requirements (Didactic Program in Dietetics) as required by the Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education of the American Dietetic Association. These requirements are met in the courses that comprise the Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD). The DPD at Case Western Reserve University is currently granted Developmental Accreditation by the Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education of the American Dietetic Association, 216 W. Jackson Blvd., Chicago, IL 60606-6995, 312-899-5400. A department advisor should be consulted in the freshman or sophomore year to plan the dietetics course work.

Nutrition
Bachelor of Science degree requires the completion of the Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements (GER), PHED 101, 102, and the following courses:

NTRN 201, 342, 343, 363, 364 and three NTRN electives

CHEM 105, 106, 113, 223

BIOL 214; BIOL 348 or PHOL 480

BIOC 307 or DEND 307

STAT 201 or 243 or 312 or 313

Bachelor of Arts degree requires the completion of the Arts and Sciences GER, PHED 101, 102, and the following courses:

NTRN 201,342, 343, 363, 364, 399 and two NTRN electives

CHEM 105, 106, 223

BIOL 214; BIOL 348 or PHOL 480

BIOC 307 or DEND 307

Nutritional Biochemistry and Metabolism
Bachelor of Arts degree requires the completion of the Arts and Sciences GER, PHED 101, 102, and the following courses:

NTRN 201, 342, 363, 364, 452 and two NTRN electives

MATH 125, 126

CHEM 105, 106, 113, 223, 224, 233, 234

BIOL 214, 215

BIOL 348 or PHOL 480

PHYS 115, 116

BIOC 307, 334

Bachelor of Science degree requires the completion of the Arts and Sciences GER, PHED 101, 102, and the following courses:

NTRN 201, 342, 363, 364, 452 and two NTRN electives

MATH 121, 122, 223, 224

ENGR 131

CHEM 105, 106, 113, 223, 224, 233, 234

BIOL 214, 215

BIOL 348 or PHOL 480

PHYS 121 and 122 or 123 and 124; 221 or 223

BIOC 307, 334

MINOR PROGRAMS

The basic sequence for a minor program consists of NTRN 201, Nutrition (3); NTRN 343, Dietary Patterns (3); and an additional 9 hours of nutrition courses, selected from: NTRN 328, 342, 351, 363, 364, 365, 388.

NUTRITION (NTRN)

Undergraduate Courses

NTRN 201. Nutrition (3)
The nutrients, their functions, food sources, and factors affecting human needs throughout life.

NTRN 328. Child Development and Health (3)
Growth and development of the child from prenatal through adolescence, including individuality, maturation, and biological needs.

NTRN 342. Food Science (5)
Chemical, physical and biological properties of food constituents and their interactions in food preparation and processing and practical application of processing methods and their effect on nutritional quality and acceptability. Laboratory and lecture. Prereq: CHEM 106.

NTRN 343. Dietary Patterns (3)
Examination of the food supply in the United States as it is affected by production, processing, marketing, government programs, regulation, and consumer selection. Nutritional evaluation of dietary patterns of different cultures. Prereq: NTRN 201 or consent.

NTRN 351. Food Service Systems Management (3)
The application of organizational theory and skills in the preparation and service of quantity food. Laboratory experience in professional food services are included. Prereq: Nutrition major or consent of instructor.

NTRN 360. Guided Study in Nutrition Practice (3)
Methods for the provision of nutrition services to individuals and groups. Principles of professional practice including ethics, standards, and regulatory issues. Prereq: NTRN 363 or NTRN 433 or consent.

NTRN 363. Human Nutrition I: Energy, Protein, Minerals (3)
Chemical and physiological properties of specific nutrients, including interrelationships and multiple factors, in meeting nutritional needs throughout the life cycle. Prereq: NTRN 201, CHEM 223 and BIOL 348 or equivalent.

NTRN 364. Human Nutrition II: Vitamins (3)
Chemical and physiological properties of vitamins, including interrelationships and multiple factors, in meeting nutritional needs throughout the life cycle. Prereq: NTRN 363 or consent.

NTRN 365. Nutrition in Disease (4)
Application of nutrition principles to the problems of diet in disease. Prereq: NTRN 363 and BIOC 307 or equivalent.

NTRN 371. Special Problems (1-3)
Independent reading, research, or special projects supervised by a member of the nutrition faculty.

NTRN 372. Special Problems (1-3)
Independent reading, research, or special projects supervised by a member of the nutrition faculty.

NTRN 388. Seminar in Nutrition (1-3)
Prereq: Junior or Senior standing.

NTRN 390. Undergraduate Research (3-9)
Guided laboratory research in nutritional biochemistry or molecular nutrition under the sponsorship of a nutrition faculty member. Prereq: Written consent of faculty sponsor.

NTRN 399. Senior Project (3)
Formal investigation of a topic in nutrition culminating in a paper and oral presentation. Requires definition of a problem, evaluation of the scientific literature and delineation of problem-solving approaches. Prereq: Twenty-one hours of Nutrition and consent of supervising instructor.

Graduate Courses

NTRN 410. History of Food and Nutrition (3)
Investigations of the development of nutrition as a science and interactions with medicine, agriculture, public health and dietetics. Food and technological effects on health. Prereq: Consent of instructor.

NTRN 433. Advanced Human Nutrition I (4)
Emphasis on reading original research literature in energy, protein and minerals with development of critical evaluation and thinking skills. Prereq: NTRN 201 and CHEM 223 and BIOL 348 or equivalent.

NTRN 434. Advanced Human Nutrition II (3)
Emphasis on reading original research literature on vitamins with development of critical evaluation and thinking skills. Prereq: NTRN 433 or consent.

NTRN 435. Maternal and Child Nutrition (3)
Study of current research literature on nutrition for pregnancy, lactation, infancy and childhood, including assessment and requirements. Prereq: Nutrition major or consent of instructor.

NTRN 437. Evaluation of Nutrition Information for Consumers (3)
Reading and appraisal of food and nutrition literature written for the general public, including books, periodicals, and audio and visual sources. Prereq: Nutrition major or consent of instructor.

NTRN 438. Trends in Diet Therapy (3)
Evaluation and interpretation of modern concepts of nutrition related to abnormalities requiring dietary modifications. Prereq: NTRN 365 or equivalent.

NTRN 440. Nutrition for the Aging and Aged (3)
Consideration of the processes of aging and needs which continue throughout life. The influences of food availability, intake, economics, culture, physical and social conditions and chronic disease as they affect the ability of the aged to cope with living situations. Prereq: Nutrition major or consent of instructor.

NTRN 446. Advanced Maternal Nutrition: Special Topics (3)
Analysis of the problems commonly associated with high-risk pregnancies and fetal outcome. Discussion of causes, mechanisms, management and current research. Prereq: NTRN 435 or consent.

NTRN 451. Food Service Systems Management (3)
Application of organizational theory and skills in the preparation and service of quantity food. Laboratory experiences in professional food services are included. Students will analyze one aspect of food service management in depth. Prereq: Nutrition Major or consent.

NTRN 452. Nutritional Biochemistry and Metabolism (3)
Mechanisms of regulation of pathways of intermediary metabolism; amplification of biochemical signals; substrate cycling and use of radioactive and stable isotopes to measure metabolic rates. Prereq: BIOC 307 or equivalent. Cross-listed as BIOC 452.

NTRN 454. Isotope Tracer Methodology (3)
Stable and radioactive isotopes in metabolic research concentrating on the design of in-vitro and in-vivo investigative protocols using mostly stable isotopes and mass spectrometric analysis; critical interpretation of data from the recent literature; and pathway identification and kinetics. Prereq: BIOC 407.

NTRN 455. Molecular Nutrition (3)
Nutrient control of gene expression in mammalian cells and deregulation of expression of these genes. The molecular basis of nutrition-related diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, PKU, and LDL-receptor deficiency, will be discussed. The application of genetic manipulation to metabolism and nutrition will be evaluated. Prereq: BIOC 407.

NTRN 460. Sports Nutrition (3)
Study of the relationships of nutrition and food intake to body composition and human performance. Laboratory sessions include demonstrations of body composition and fitness measurements and participation in a research project. Prereq: NTRN 363 or NTRN 433 or consent.

NTRN 516. Seminar in Dietetics I (4)
Study of scientific basis for clinical and community nutrition practice and developments in food service systems management. Prereq: Dietetic internship.

NTRN 517. Seminar in Dietetics II (4)
Study of scientific basis for clinical and community nutrition practice and developments in food service systems management. Prereq: Dietetic internship.

NTRN 528. Introduction to Public Health Nutrition (3)
Philosophy, objectives, organization, and focus of government and voluntary agencies with emphasis on nutrition components. Prereq: Public health nutrition majors only.

NTRN 530. Public Health Nutrition (3)
Analysis of public health programs in government and voluntary health agencies and the effect of legislation. Emphasis on integration with other disciplines working in public health settings and the role of a public health nutritionist. Prereq: Consent of instructor.

NTRN 531. Public Health Nutrition Field Experience (1-6)
Individually planned public health experience. May be concurrent with course work in local agencies or in blocks of full-time work with a city, county, or state health agency. Prereq: Open to public health nutrition students only.

NTRN 532A. General Nutrition Care (1-3)
Individually arranged clinical experience.

NTRN 532C. Specialized Public Health Nutrition Field Experience (1-3)
Individually arranged clinical experience. Prereq: Public Health Nutrition students only.

NTRN 532D. Hospital Dietetics (1-3)
Individually arranged clinical experience.

NTRN 532E. Clinical Research: Methods in Nutrition and Metabolism (3)
Individually arranged.

NTRN 533. Nutritional Care of Neonate (3)
Nutritional assessment and management of high-risk newborns with emphasis on prematurity and low birth weight. Review of current literature coordinated with clinical experience in the neonatal intensive care unit. Issues on follow-up included. Prereq: NTRN 435 or consent.

NTRN 550A. Advanced Community Nutrition (3)
Development of skills needed by the community dietitian. Emphasis on effective tools for service development and delivery. Recommended courses of action for the professional.

NTRN 550B. Seminar: Dietetics (1)

NTRN 551. Seminar in Advanced Nutrition (2-3)

NTRN 561. Investigative Methods in Nutrition (1-4)
Research methods appropriate for nutrition. Methods for conducting research in nutrition and food sciences, food service management and dietetics. Designing research proposals. Prereq: Nutrition major or consent of instructor.

NTRN 601. Special Problems (1-18)

NTRN 651. Thesis M.S. (1-18)

NTRN 701. Dissertation Ph.D. (1-18)

NTRN 702. Appointed Dissertation Fellow (9)

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN NUTRITION: HUMAN NUTRITION MAJOR

Fall Semester

Freshman

CHEM 105 Principles of Chemistry I

(3)

ENGL 150 Expository Writing

(3)

MATH

(3-4)

GER: Social Sciences

(3)

GER: Arts/Humanities

(3)

PHED 101 Physical Education

(0)

Sophomore

NTRN 342 Food Science

(5)

STAT 201 Basic Statistics for the Social and Life Sciences I

(3)

CHEM 223 Introductory Organic Chemistry I

(3)

CHEM 233 Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory *

(2)

GER: Social Sciences

(3)

Junior

BIOL 348 Human Anatomy and Physiology

(4)

DEND 307 Biochemistry

(4)

GER: Arts/Humanities

(3)

GER: Global Diversity

(3)

Senior

NTRN 363 Energy, Protein, and Minerals

(3)

NTRN Elective

(3)

Electives

(12)

* Strongly recommended but not required.

Spring Semester

Freshman

CHEM 106 Principles of Chemistry II

(3)

CHEM 113 Principles of Chemistry Laboratory

(2)

NTRN 201 Nutrition

(3)

MATH

(3-4)

BIOL 214 Genes and Evolution

(4)

PHED 102 Physical Education

(0)

Sophomore

NTRN 343 Dietary Patterns

(3)

CHEM 224 Introductory Organic Chemistry II*

(3)

CHEM 234 Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory II*

(2)

GER: Social Sciences

(3)

GER: Arts/Humanities

(3)

Junior

BIOL 343 Microbiology*

(3)

BIOL 344 Laboratory for Microbiology*

(2)

NTRN elective

(3)

GER: Arts/Humanities

(3)

Elective

(6)

Senior

NTRN 364 Vitamins

(3)

NTRN elective

(3)

Electives

(9)

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN NUTRITION:
NUTRITIONAL BIOCHEMISTRY AND METABOLISM MAJOR

Freshman Year

Credit Hours

Fall

MATH 125 Mathematics I

(4)

CHEM 105 Principles of Chemistry I

(3)

ENGL 150 Expository Writing

(3)

GER: Arts/Humanities

(3)

GER: Social Sciences

(3)

PHED 101 Physical Education

(0)

Spring

MATH 126 Mathematics II

(4)

CHEM 106 Principles of Chemistry II

(3)

CHEM 113 Principles of Chemistry Laboratory

(2)

NTRN 201 Nutrition

(3)

BIOL 214 Genes and Evolution

(4)

PHED 102 Physical Education

(0)

Sophomore Year

Fall

CHEM 223 Introductory Organic Chemistry I

(3)

CHEM 233 Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory

(2)

NTRN 342 Food Science

(5)

BIOL 215: Cells and Proteins

(4)

GER: Social Sciences

(3)

Spring

CHEM 224 Introductory Organic Chemistry II

(3)

CHEM 234 Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory II

(2)

GER: Arts/Humanities

(3)

GER: Social Sciences

(3)

Elective

(3)

Junior Year

Credit Hours

Fall

BIOL 348 Human Anatomy and Physiology

(4)

PHYS 115 Introductory Physics I

(4)

BIOC 307 General Biochemistry

(4)

GER: Arts/Humanities

(3)

Spring

PHYS 116 Introductory Physics II

(4)

GER: Global Diversity

(3)

GER: Arts/Humanities

(3)

Elective

(6)

Senior Year

Fall

NTRN 363 Energy, Protein, Minerals

(3)

NTRN 452 Nutritional Biochemistry

(3)

BIOC 334 Protein and Enzymes

(3)

Electives

(6)

Spring

NTRN 364 Human Nutrition II: Vitamins

(3)

Nutrition electives

(6)

Elective

(3)