Department of History


106 Mather House
www.case.edu/artsci/hsty
Phone: 216-368-2380; Fax: 216-368-4681
Jonathan Sadowsky, Chair
E-mail: jonathan.sadowsky@case.edu

 

The Department of History offers comprehensive undergraduate and graduate programs, with particular emphases on American history; the history of science, technology, environment, and medicine; and social history and policy. Historical studies are sometimes categorized among humanistic studies and sometimes among the social sciences. Allied with both traditions, historians seek an understanding of the past by analyzing societies and how they change over time.


The Department of History offers instruction within the customary frameworks that have formed the basis of historical studies, and it also has developed special emphases in social, cultural, political, and economic perspectives that allow instruction and research on such topics as the African-American experience, the environment, business and economy, technology and science, medicine, women’s history and gender studies, legal history, and comparative social history. Courses in history, or a formal major or minor in history, traditionally have been attractive to students as preparation for a wide variety of career and professional interests, including teaching, law, government, and journalism, and such public history activities as archival administration, historical museum administration, restoration and preservation of historic sites, and writing.


Department Faculty


Jonathan Sadowsky, Ph.D.
(Johns Hopkins University)

Theodore J. Castele Professor; Associate Professor and Chair; Adjunct Associate Professor of Global Health and Diseases, School of Medicine
Medical history; African history; comparative history


Molly W. Berger, Ph.D.
(Case Western Reserve University)

Instructor; Associate Dean, College of Arts and Sciences
History of technology; U.S. cultural history; nineteenth and twentieth centuries


John Broich, Ph. D.
(Stanford University)

Assistant Professor
British history; British Empire; environmental history; history of public health


Daniel Cohen, Ph.D.
(Brandeis University)

Associate Professor
Colonial America; U.S. cultural history


David C. Hammack, Ph.D.
(Columbia University)

Hiram C. Haydn Professor of History
American social and urban history; economic history


Marixa Lasso, Ph.D.
(University of Florida)

Assistant Professor
Latin American and Caribbean history; race and nationalism


Kenneth F. Ledford, Ph.D., J.D.
(Johns Hopkins University, University of North Carolina)

Associate Professor
Modern German history; Modern European history; European legal history; history of the professions


Miriam R. Levin, Ph.D.
(University of Massachusetts)

Professor
Industrial culture; European technology; French cultural history


Alan Rocke, Ph.D.
(University of Wisconsin, Madison)

Henry Eldridge Bourne Professor of History; Director, History and Philosophy of Science Program
History of science; science, technology, and society


Renée M. Sentilles, Ph.D.
(College of William and Mary)

Associate Professor; Director, American Studies Program
American women’s history; U.S. cultural history; American studies


Peter Shulman, Ph.D.
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

Assistant Professor
History of technology and science; environmental history; United States foreign relations


Theodore L. Steinberg, Ph.D.
(Brandeis University)

Adeline Barry Davee Distinguished Professor of History; Professor of Law
U.S. environmental and legal history


Gillian L. Weiss, Ph.D.
(Stanford University)

Assistant Professor
Early modern France; comparative slavery; the Mediterranean


Rhonda Y. Williams, Ph.D.
(University of Pennsylvania)

Associate Professor
African American history; U.S. social history


Secondary Faculty


Rachel Sternberg
(Bryn Mawr College)

Associate Professor of Classics
Greek language and literature; Greek social history; history of emotion; reception of the classical tradition in the age of Jefferson


Peter J. Whitehouse, M.D., Ph.D.
(Johns Hopkins University)

Professor of Neurology
Geriatric neurology; behavioral neurology; dementia; history of neurology


Adjunct Faculty


James M. Edmonson, Ph.D.
(University of Delaware)

Adjunct Associate Professor; Director, Dittrick Medical History Center
Medical history


John Grabowski, Ph.D.
(Case Western Reserve University)

Krieger-Mueller Associate Professor in Applied History
U.S. history; immigration and ethnicity; local history


Gladys Haddad, Ph.D.
(Case Western Reserve University)

Adjunct Professor
American studies; women’s education


John Vacha, M.A.
(Case Western Reserve University)

Adjunct Assistant Professor
Theater history


Undergraduate Programs


Major


The history major may be elected in one of two formats: (1) the regular major, and (2) the teacher licensure major.

  1. The regular major requires a minimum of 30 hours in history courses, including HSTY 112, HSTY 113, HSTY 250 (Issues and Methods in History), and HSTY 398 (Senior Research Seminar), as well as six additional courses in history, four of which must be agreed upon in consultation with the departmental advisor to form a coherent field of historical inquiry. The focus might be geographical (for example, European history), chronological (for example, 20th-century history), topical (for example, women’s history), or some combination of these. The remaining two courses are open electives, and with permission, a course outside of History, in a related discipline, may be accepted towards the hours for the major.
  2. The teacher licensure major requires 30 hours of history, including the same four courses required for the regular major and a minimum of six semester hours in each of three focus areas: United States history, World/European studies, and Asian, African, and Latin American studies. Candidates for teacher licensure (Integrated Social Studies, Adolescents and Young Adults) must also take courses in economics, political science, and sociology (9 hours), and 35 hours in education courses offered through Case Western Reserve and John Carroll University (see Teacher Licensure description elsewhere in this bulletin), culminating in student teaching. Students interested in pursuing this option should confer with the department’s undergraduate advisor.

Subject area requirements (39 hours):
HSTY 112, 113, 250, 398; two of HSTY 152, 206, 253, 255, 256, 257, 260, 262, 266, 325, 353, 354, 355, 356, 358, 378; two of HSTY 151, 200, 211, 212, 221, 222, 223, 254, 308, 309, 310, 334, 335, 342; two of HSTY 131, 135, 258, 268, 280, 281, 282, 285, 382, 383; one of ECON 102 or 103 or POSC 260; one of SOCI 112A, 112B, 113A, 113B, 302, 310. (With advisor approval, economics requirement may be met with HSTY 255, sociology requirement may be met with HSTY 262 or HSTY 325, and political science requirement may be met with HSTY 256.)

 

Integrated Graduate Studies


The Department of History participates in the Integrated Graduate Studies program. Interested students should note the general requirements and procedures of the Graduate School, but must also consult the departmental advisor about the specific requirements, guidelines, and opportunities for IGS in history.


Minor


A minor in history is available to all undergraduate students. It consists of 15 hours in history, including HSTY 112-113 (history core courses) and three additional courses, chosen in consultation with the departmental advisor; the courses must form a coherent field of historical inquiry.


Advanced Placement Credit


Students with Advanced Placement (AP) scores of 4 or better will receive three semester hours of college credit, applicable to the total number of credits required for graduation as well as to any major, minor, or sequence in history. AP credit may not be applied to the HSTY 112 and 113 core courses. Credit by way of AP examination in U.S. history is given for HSTY 256 (American Political History) and in European history for HSTY 212 (Modern European History).


Graduate Programs


The Department of History offers both the M.A. and the Ph.D. in history, but it emphasizes its two focused Ph.D. programs, in Social History and Policy and in the History of Science, Technology, Environment and Medicine. In practice, these two programs are closely related. The department also joins with the Law School to offer an M.A./J.D. dual-degree program. Informally, students can combine graduate study in history with the certificate or degree programs of the Mandel Center for Nonprofit Organizations. All applicants for graduate degrees in history must submit transcripts from all previous undergraduate, graduate, and professional study, scores on the GRE or a comparable standardized test, and three letters of recommendation. The department recommends, but does not require, an undergraduate major in history.


Master of Arts


The M.A. in history requires 27 hours of course work, including 6 hours of carefully supervised work on a master’s thesis (a work of original research based on primary sources). For the joint J.D./M.A. program, students must be admitted to both the History graduate program and the law school. They can earn the degree in either three and one-half years or three years and two summers of study, completing a total of 106 hours (including double credits of up to nine hours).


Doctor of Philosophy


Students are admitted into the History Department’s graduate programs with or without a master’s or professional degree. Students who do not have a master’s degree in history may be required to complete that degree in the department before moving on to the Ph.D.; those who have earned graduate or professional degrees closely related to their Ph.D. programs may petition for direct admission to the Ph.D. program. Students who first complete their M.A. in history at Case Western Reserve must complete an additional 24 hours of course work, pass the qualifying exams required by their program of study, and prepare a Ph.D. dissertation while enrolling in at least 18 hours of supervised dissertation-writing work. Students who have completed their master’s-level work before coming to Case Western Reserve must complete at least 24 hours of course work before taking their qualifying exams. All Ph.D. students are required to take HSTY 470 (Historiography, Method, and Theory), HSTY 477 (Seminar in Comparative History), and HSTY 479 (Historical Research and Writing).


Program in Social History and Policy


The Social History and Policy program is designed to prepare students for careers either as analysts and administrators of social policy, or as teachers and researchers in colleges and universities. The program defines social policy broadly to include not only welfare, family and juvenile matters, aging, health care, and medicine, but also education, urban history, environmental history, cultural policies regarding museums, libraries and similar agencies, and labor. The program recognizes that social policies are made and put into practice by private, nonprofit organizations and through legal institutions as well as through federal, state, and local legislatures and executives.


Applicants for the Social History and Policy program must submit GRE scores and three letters of recommendation. The program does not require an M.A. in history, and has admitted several students with J.D., M.S.W., library science, or other degrees, but it often requires students with limited backgrounds in U.S. history to take extra course work. More tightly structured than the traditional Ph.D., the Social History and Policy program requires 18 hours of course work (and possibly additional hours to prepare for examinations); qualifying examinations in U.S. history and in the history of social policy; a cognate field; and a dissertation. The program also includes an option for the student to complete a policy-related internship; recent internships have been conducted with the Cleveland Federation for Community Planning, the Interchurch Council of Greater Cleveland, the Bureau of Jewish Education, the Sisters of Charity of St. Augustine, and the Hathaway Brown School.


Program in the History of Science, Technology, Environment and Medicine


The History of Science, Technology, Environment and Medicine program was established in 1961 as the first in the nation to emphasize the history of technology as well as the history of science. The program’s areas of particular strength include the social and cultural history of technology, both American and European, technology and science policy, the history of the physical sciences since the Renaissance, gender issues in technology and science, the history of medicine, and the history of the environment. The course of study for the Ph.D. includes the M.A. requirements, written and oral qualifying examinations, and a dissertation. While most graduates of the program teach in universities, others work in museums or archives, or deal with science policy questions.


The Department of History also offers a traditional Ph.D. program in U.S. history. For this program, which does not admit students every year, an M.A. in history is strongly recommended. This program requires 24 hours of course work beyond the M.A. as well as comprehensive oral examinations in the general field (U.S. history from the colonial period to the present), in a major field (a period or subfield of U.S. history), and in two cognate fields, at least one of which is a field other than U.S. history.


Facilities


Case Western Reserve University, the other institutions in the University Circle neighborhood, and the Cleveland area in general offer excellent facilities for historical research. These facilities are especially strong in the fields of social history and policy and in the history of medicine, health care, nonprofit organizations, technology, and science. The university library’s extensive collections in these fields are significantly augmented by the holdings of the nationally ranked Allen Memorial Library in the history of medicine and health care, and of the equally distinguished Western Reserve Historical Society in regional economic, social, nonprofit, ethnic, African-American, and Jewish history. Both the Allen Memorial Library and the Western Reserve Historical Society library are adjacent to the campus. The Cleveland Public Library, just five miles from campus in downtown Cleveland, is the third largest public library in the U.S.; it maintains excellent research collections in Ohio, U.S., and British history, technology, and business. The University has also pioneered in the development of electronic connections to other libraries and to research resources in general; Ohio’s many colleges and universities have one of the nation’s leading interlibrary loan programs.


Course Descriptions


HSTY 106. Introduction to Early American History (3)
History of colonial British North America and the early United States through 1860. Focuses on contrasting social systems in different colonies and regions; causes and consequences of the American Revolution; political, religious, and economic transformations between 1790 and 1860. Students will examine various scholarly approaches and methods, but will particularly explore the lives and values of early Americans through personal writings such as diaries and autobiographies.


HSTY 110. Roman Civilization (3)
The enduring significance of the Romans studied through their history, literature, art, and philosophy. Lectures and discussion.
Offered as CLSC 112 and HSTY 110.


HSTY 111. Greek Civilization (3)
This course constitutes the first half of a year-long sequence on classical civilization. It examines the enduring significance of the Greeks studied through their history, literature, art, and philosophy. Lectures and discussion. (For the second course in the sequence, see CLSC 112.)
Offered as CLSC 111 and HSTY 111.


HSTY 112. Introduction to American History (3)
History of the United States from the first settlements to the present. Emphasis on themes such as political and social revolution, slavery and race relations, industrialism, and national cultures.


HSTY 113. Introduction to Modern World History (3)
The history of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in global context. Emphasis on the forces that have created or shaped the modern world: industrialization and technological change; political ideas and movements such as nationalism; European imperialism and decolonization; and the interplay of cultural values.
Global & Cultural Diversity


HSTY 117. Introduction to American Studies (3)
This course is designed to introduce students to the interdisciplinary field of American Studies while also empowering them to use the tools and perspectives of several disciplines, such as history, literature, art history, and anthropology. This course aims to introduce students to the various disciplines that constitute American Studies while paying special attention to the ways in which these disciplines can work together to illuminate the study of American cultures, past and present. Students will combine different methodologies in the process of completing assignments designed to make use of a variety of University Circle institutions. For the purposes of this course, biography is treated as a constructed genre that comes in a variety of forms, including autobiography, biographical novels, oral histories, and film. The class will discuss how certain biographies have created archetypal American identities, and how gender/race/class/historical context, etc. have affected the writing and reading of biography and restructured notions of identity.
Offered as AMST 117 and HSTY 117.


HSTY 133. Introduction to Chinese History and Civilization (3)
This course explains the continuities and discontinuities in the history of China by stressing the development and distinctive adaptations of cultural, religious, and political patterns from the origins of the Chinese civilization to the present. By focusing on major cultural, socio-economic, and political issues such as Confucianism, Buddhism, trade relations, imperialism, and intellectual discourse in the overall Asian context (with particular reference to Korea and Japan), we discuss the historical development of China and its situation on entering the 21st century. Taking into account the key historical events in the last century, we examine the emergence of China as a modern nation-state and the fundamental transformation of Chinese society in the post-war period.
Offered as ASIA 133 and HSTY 133.
Global & Cultural Diversity


HSTY 134. Introduction to Japanese History and Civilization (3)
This course provides an introduction to various aspects of Japanese civilization, from its origins to the present. By focusing on major cultural, socio-economic, and political issues such as the adaptation and transformation of Confucianism, Buddhism, Shintoism, social structures, material culture, foreign relations, militarism, nationalism, and intellectual discourse in the overall Asian context (with particular reference to Korea and China), we discuss the historical development of Japan and the country’s position on entering the 21st century. We examine the emergence of Japan as a modern nation-state and the fundamental transformation of its society in the post-war period.
Offered as ASIA 134 and HSTY 134.
Global & Cultural Diversity


HSTY 135. Introduction to Modern African History (3)
A general introduction to major themes in modern African history, with an emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Topics include oral tradition and narrative, economic structure and dynamics, religious movements, colonialism, nationalism, and the dilemmas of independent African states.
Offered as ETHS 253A and HSTY 135.
Global & Cultural Diversity


HSTY 136. Introduction to Latin American History (3)
This course provides an introduction to the historical and cultural development of Latin America, in an attempt to identify the forces, both internal and external, which shape the social, economic and political realities in present day Latin America. Beginning with its pre-Columbian civilizations, the course moves through the conquest and colonial period of the Americas, the wars of independence and the emergence of nation-states in the nineteenth century, and the issues confronting the region throughout the turbulent twentieth century, such as migration and urbanization, popular protest and revolution, environmental degradation, great power intervention, the drug trade and corruption, and the integration of the region into the global economy.
Offered as ETHS 253B and HSTY 136.
Global & Cultural Diversity


HSTY 151. Technology in European Civilization (3)
The history of technology in ancient Mediterranean, medieval, and modern European society until the First World War. The course introduces students to the relationship between technology and its social, political, and cultural settings, and to the values invested in technology at significant historical moments. There will be visits to local industrial sites, architectural and engineering monuments, and the Cleveland Museum of Art.


HSTY 152. Technology in America (3)
Origins and significance of technological developments in American history, from the first settlements to the present. Emphasis on the social, cultural, political, and economic significance of technology in American history.


HSTY 163. Modern Britain and Its Empire (3)
This lecture and discussion course covers the history of Britain at the height of its political and industrial power and the history of the expanding and contracting British Empire. Britain was a nation of great technological, economic, and military power, but it also experienced extraordinary stresses. Industrialization meant material prosperity for some, but hardship and dehumanization for others. Many questioned how overwhelming poverty and ignorance could be allowed to stand beside such vast affluence. And subjects of the British in India, Ireland, and elsewhere struggled for independence from an empire that claimed to bring freedom, reason, and equality. The British learned to their cost, too, that decolonization often meant being caught in the crossfire of ethnic rivals. This course will explore the many paradoxes of the history of the British at their most dominant.


HSTY 200. The Ancient World (3)
Ancient Western history from the origins of civilization in Mesopotamia to the dissolution of the Roman Empire in the West.
Offered as CLSC 201 and HSTY 200.


HSTY 201. Science in Western Thought I (3)
The development of Western thinking about the natural world and our relation to it, as part of culture, from pre-classical civilizations to the age of Newton.


HSTY 202. Science in Western Thought II (3)
The development of Western thinking about the natural world and our relation to it, as part of culture, from Newton to the modern age. HSTY 201 is not a prerequisite.


HSTY 203. Natural Philosophy I (3)
Historical and philosophical interpretation of some epochal events in development of science. Copernican revolution, Newtonian mechanics, Einstein’s relativity physics, quantum mechanics, and evolutionary theory; patterns of scientific growth; structure of scientific “revolutions;” science and “pseudo-science.” First half of a year-long sequence.
Offered as HSTY 203 and PHIL 203.


HSTY 204. Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector (3)
The United States has by far the largest and most important “nonprofit sector” in the world, a sector consisting of voluntary non-governmental organizations that provide health care, education and social services as well as arts, religious, and advocacy activities. Using mostly primary sources, this course considers the significance of the nonprofit sector in the U.S., its advantages and disadvantages, its uses for different groups of Americans, and current trends. Students have the option of writing either a standard term paper, or a study of strategic challenges facing a contemporary nonprofit organization.
Offered as HSTY 204 and HSTY 404.
SAGES Dept Seminar


HSTY 207. Natural Philosophy II (3)
Conceptual, methodological, and epistemological issues about science: concept formation, explanation, prediction, confirmation, theory construction and status of unobservables; metaphysical presuppositions and implications of science; semantics of scientific language; illustrations from special sciences. Second half of a year-long sequence.
Offered as HSTY 207 and PHIL 204.


HSTY 208. Social History of Crime (3)
This course explores the relationship between law and history in American society. It uses social history methodology to suggest new ways of understanding how the law works as a system of power to advance certain interests at the expense of less powerful groups. Emphasis is on issues of pressing concern to America’s poor and working class, including the death penalty, abortion, rape, the war on drugs, and the prison industry.


HSTY 210. Byzantine World 300-1453 (3)
Development of the Byzantine empire from the emperor Constantine’s conversion to Christianity and founding of the eastern capital at Constantinople to the fall of Constantinople to Turkish forces in 1453.
Offered as CLSC 210 and HSTY 210.


HSTY 211. The Medieval World, 300-1500 (3)
Medieval history and civilization from the fall of the Roman Empire to the age of the Renaissance. Interactions between medieval Europe and other Mediterranean and Eurasian cultures.


HSTY 212. Modern European History (3)
The history of Europe from the late eighteenth century to the present. Themes include political upheavals and movements, as well as industrial, social, intellectual, and cultural changes. This course provides a solid foundation for those wishing to take more specialized courses in European history.


HSTY 213. Earthquake, Flood, and Fire: Natural Disaster in History (3)
The wind blows, mobile homes take flight, and people die. Natural disasters are that simple. Or are they? This course employs a historical approach to penetrate the mythology of natural disaster, focusing on the human dimension behind these so-called natural acts. By peeling back the layers of obfuscation, deposited there by successive generations of city boosters and technocrats, we learn that there is nothing simple or natural behind hurricane, tornado, flood, and earthquake calamities.


HSTY 214. Comparative Slavery (3)
People around the world have been enslaving one another since the beginning of time. From the seventeenth to the nineteenth centuries, millions of African chattel labored on southern plantations, supporting the “peculiar institution” whose terrible legacy remains with us today. For hundreds of years before European slave traders began ferrying human cargo across the Atlantic, however, coercive bondage was a well-entrenched feature of Mediterranean civilizations, justified by religious and secular law alike. This course will explore diverse types of unfree labor, from slavery in ancient Greece and Rome, serfdom in medieval Europe, captivity in North Africa and indentured servitude in colonial America. Did earlier systems of domination around the Mediterranean prepare the way for the establishment of Atlantic slavery? How did ideologies about religious difference, ethnicity, and race help justify this ultimate form of human degradation?
Offered as: EHTS 214, HSTY 214


HSTY 215. Europe in the 20th Century (3)
The twentieth century has seen stupendous transformations in the internal structures of European politics, economics, society, and culture and in Europe’s place in the world. This course traces Europe’s transition from a continent of sovereign nation-states or empires ruled by monarchs with starkly hierarchical social structures, through wars, revolution, dictatorships, destruction, division, and destitution, to a conflicted present. The contradictory combination of peace, freedom, and pluralism combined with cultural critique of the very consumer society that has reduced conflict challenges students’ linear notions of historical development.


HSTY 216. Vikings and Medieval Scandinavia (3)
A survey of the history of the Vikings and medieval Scandinavia, covering approximately the eighth to the fifteenth centuries AD. Topics explored include: causes of the “outbreak” and cessation of Viking expeditions, the role of the Vikings as raiders and/or traders in Western Europe, the role of the Vikings in the emerging states of Russia, Iceland and medieval Scandinavian law, the historicity of the saga literature, and Viking descendents--Normans and “Rus.”


HSTY 217. History of Corporate America (3)
This course will explore the origins and evolution of big business’s role in American society. It is not a course about the history of corporations but rather a course that examines how corporate entities have affected fundamental aspects of political, social, and economic life. It will deal with the period from the late nineteenth century to the present and cover such topics as diverse as labor relations and advertising to media issues and lobbying. Our goal is to examine how an historical perspective can help us come to grips with topics of pressing importance to us as Americans today.


HSTY 218. Jews in Early Modern Europe (3)
This course surveys the history of Jews in Europe and the wider world from the Spanish expulsion through the French Revolution. Tracking peregrinations out of the Iberian Peninsula to the British Isles, France, Holland, Italy, Germany, Poland-Lithuania, the Ottoman Empire and the American colonies, it examines the diverse ways Jews organized their communities, interacted with their non-Jewish neighbors and negotiated their social, economic and legal status within different states and empires. What role did Jews play and what symbolic place did they occupy during a period of European expansion, technological innovation, artistic experimentation, and religious and political turmoil? What internal and external dynamics affected Jewish experiences in the sixteenth, seventeenth and eighteenth centuries? Through a selection of inquisitorial transcripts, government records, memoirs and historical literature, we will explore topics such as persecution, conversion, messiaen, toleration, emancipation and assimilation.
Offered as HSTY 218 and JDST 218, ETHS 218.


HSTY 220. The Early Modern Mediterranean (3)
For centuries before Columbus crossed the Atlantic Ocean, travelers and traders, pirates and pilgrims, mercenaries and missionaries explored the contours of the Mediterranean Sea--and engaged in commerce, as well as religious, economic and military competition. If religion and ethnicity divided Muslims, Christians and Jews from Algiers to Athens, did shared geography, foodstuffs, and cultural values bind them together? This course examines the unity and diversity of this maritime region by considering the peoples, beliefs, commodities and diseases that circulated through it during the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries. Does the early modern Mediterranean showcase a clash of civilizations or provide an enduring model for coexistence? Topics include merchant culture, diplomacy, honor and shame, slavery and colonization.
Offered as ETHS 220, HSTY 220.


HSTY 221. Medieval and Tudor/Stuart England (3)
English history from Anglo-Saxon times through the Tudor and Stuart age; kings and kingship, the growth of Parliament, the common law, international politics, and England’s relations with Celtic Britain.


HSTY 224. Early Modern Europe (3)
Europe has not always existed. To find out who created it and when, this course will ask two fundamental questions: First, how did the geographic, linguistic, religious and ethnic characteristics of European identity develop over the course of the sixteenth, seventeenth and eighteenth centuries? Second, how did Europeans in this period influence other parts of the world? Through close readings of memoirs, treatises and chronicles, and discussions of secondary literature, we will explore the political, social, and religious history of Europe from roughly 1500 to 1800. Topics include: exploration and conquest; Protestant and Catholic reformations; witchcraft and popular culture; science and medicine; Enlightenment and Revolution.


HSTY 225. Evolution (3)
Multidisciplinary study of the course and processes of organic evolution provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationships among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms. Topics include the genetic basis of micro- and macro-evolutionary change, the concept of adaptation, natural selection, population dynamics, theories of species formation, principles of phylogenetic inference, biogeography, evolutionary rates, evolutionary convergence, homology, Darwinian medicine, and conceptual and philosophic issues in evolutionary theory.
Offered as ANTH 225, BIOL 225, GEOL 225, HSTY 225, and PHIL 225.


HSTY 234. France and Islam (3)
This seminar examines French encounters with the Muslim world from the Middle Ages to the present. Over the last millennium, France has viewed Saracens, Moriscos, Turks, Berbers, and Arabs with admiration and fear, disdain and incomprehension. Between the eleventh and thirteenth centuries, French soldiers battled in the Holy Land; for several hundred years after that, France and the Ottoman Empire exchanged diplomats, traders and slaves. The colonial occupation of Algeria that began in 1830 ended violently in 1962. By then, the empire that struck back had also come home through large waves of immigration. Today, the social and economic status, religious affiliation, political significance and cultural impact of French citizens of North African descent are the subject of burning national debate. Taking a long view on Franco-Muslim relations, the course will explore such topics as the Crusades, Mediterranean piracy and captivity, Napoleon’s Egyptian campaign, the Algerian War of Independence, the “veil affair,” riots in the suburbs of Paris and World Cup soccer.
Offered as ETHS 234, HSTY 234.
SAGES Dept Seminar


HSTY 238. Jews in the Modern World (3)
Investigation of the impact of modernity on the Jewish community. In particular the course will examine the influence of the Emancipation and Enlightenment on the social situation of the Jews in Europe and America and the corresponding changes in Judaic religion, philosophy, social structure, and culture. Attention will be paid to the creation of a modern Jewish identity in the secular culture of the post-Modern world.
Offered as HSTY 238, JDST 231, and RLGN 231.


HSTY 240. The Body in History (3)
This course examines the changing experiences of human bodies in history. It shows how science and culture have shaped diverse human experiences which often appear immutable, including sexuality, eating, race, and sickness.


HSTY 243. The Age of Prozac: Social and Cultural Aspects of Depression (3)
Although often experienced as an intensely individual, private, and painfully isolated affliction, depression has profound social and cultural dimensions. This course will neglect neither biological (neurochemical or genetic) perspectives, nor personal or psychological aspects, but will emphasize perspectives derived from history, anthropology, and sociology. While there may be tangential attention to bi-polar disorder (“manic depression”), the emphasis will be on unipolar depression. The course will conclude with an in-depth exploration of the rise of pharmaceutical treatments.


HSTY 246. People and the Land in Pre-Modern Europe (3)
This course explores the relationship between the peoples of Europe and their environments as Europe changed from a backwater of the Roman Empire into the seat of a number of globe-spanning empires. It examines how Europeans changed the land over time in order to derive a subsistence, produce profit, and, later, to fuel the growth and power of early modern state. The course will delve into the ways that Europeans thought about nature and conceived of their place in it. It will also explore how the environment itself influenced the courses of European societies; how climate and disease, animals and energy sources affected population growth, industrial activity, and even legal systems. As European powers sent their conquerors and colonists across the globe, they carried with them a tradition of thinking about, and interacting with, the environment in ways that had dramatic consequences for the world beyond Europe, and this course investigates whence this tradition came.


HSTY 250. Issues and Methods in History (3)
A methodological introduction to historical research. Students use a variety of approaches to interpret and study historical problems. Specific topics and instructors normally vary from year to year.


HSTY 252A. Introduction to African-American Studies (3)
This course is designed to introduce students to the study of Black History, cultures, economics, and politics. Students will learn about the development of the field by exploring theoretical questions, methodological approaches, and major themes that have shaped the study of black people, primarily in the U.S. context. This is a seminar-style, discussion-based course that emphasizes critical analysis and expository writing.
Offered as ETHS 252A and HSTY 252A.
Global & Cultural Diversity


HSTY 253. Technology and American Culture (3)
American technology is a cultural phenomenon, a part of, rather than separate from, more general concerns. Examines technology through historical writings, literature, images, and both material and popular culture.


HSTY 254. The Holocaust (3)
History of racism in European society from 18th to 20th century; investigation, from perspectives of history, psychology, literature, philosophy, and religion, of how bureaucracy could exterminate six million Jews; responses of individuals, groups, institutions, and nations to deliberate extermination of nearly a whole people.
Offered as HSTY 254 and RLGN 254.
Global & Cultural Diversity


HSTY 255. Economic History of the United States (3)
The growth of the American economy from the colonial period to the present. Competing explanations of economic growth; significant attention to the political and legal environment in which the U.S. economy developed; “lessons” of past experience for contemporary policy; some attention to inequality and the changing distribution of wealth and income.
Offered as ECON 255 and HSTY 255.


HSTY 256. American Political History (3)
From the origins of American politics in the colonial period to the present. The Revolution and Constitutional debate; presidential politics and leadership; voters and voting patterns; Congress and the courts. Emphasis both on the ideas that animated American politics and on the relation of politics to society.


HSTY 257. Immigrants in America (3)
Immigration to America has constantly reshaped the way the nation views itself. This course examines the overall history of immigration to the United States, but places that movement within a global context. It also pays particular attention to the roles that policy and technology have played in controlling or defining immigration to America.


HSTY 258. History of Southern Africa (3)
A survey of southern Africa from about 1600. Topics include the social structure of pre-colonial African societies, the beginnings of European settlement, the rise of Shaka, the discovery of minerals and the development of industry, Zimbabwe’s guerrilla war and independence, and the rise and apparent demise of apartheid.
Offered as ETHS 258 and HSTY 258.
Global & Cultural Diversity


HSTY 260. U.S. Slavery and Emancipation (3)
Begins with the African encounter with Europeans during the emergence of the modern slave trade. Students are introduced to the documents and secondary literature on the creation and maintenance of slavery, first in colonial America, and then in the United States. The course concludes with the destruction of slavery.
Offered as ETHS 260 and HSTY 260.
Global & Cultural Diversity


HSTY 261. African-American History 1865-1945
Explores the fashioning of a modern African-American culture between emancipation and the end of World War II. Emergence of a northern-based leadership, the challenge of segregation, emergence of bourgeois culture, the fashioning of racial consciousness and black nationalism, the shift from a primarily southern and rural population to one increasingly northern and urban, the creation and contours of a modern African-American culture, the construction of racial/gender and racial/class consciousness.
Offered as ETHS 261 and HSTY 261.
Global & Cultural Diversity


HSTY 262. African-American History Since 1945 (3)
Completes the three-term sequence of the African-American history survey (although the first two courses are not prerequisites for this course). Explores some of the key events and developments shaping African-American social, political, and cultural history since 1945.
Offered as HSTY 262 and ETHS 262.
Global & Cultural Diversity


HSTY 265. History of the Professions (3)
Professions are one of the central occupational structures of modern society. This course teaches about the historical context of the professions that many students will seek to join. It covers the three classic “learned” professions of clergy, law, and medicine, and newer ones such as accountancy, engineering, management, and nursing. It is comparative and interdisciplinary, examining the liberal, small-state, contexts of England and the United States, and the contrasting strong-state contexts of France, Germany, and Russia, applying theory from sociology, anthropology, and gender studies.


HSTY 266. The Engineer in America (3)
History, culture, politics, ethical considerations, and gender issues of the engineering profession in the United States.


HSTY 268. Colonialism in Africa (3)
Examines the immense social and cultural changes which took place in Africa as a result of colonial occupations, in the period roughly from 1880 to 1965. It is organized around three major rubrics which were central to the colonial experience: the spread of Christianity, economic forces which led to new forms of labor, and the growth of nationalist resistance.
Offered as ETHS 268 and HSTY 268.
Global & Cultural Diversity


HSTY 270. Introduction to Gender Studies (3)
This course introduces women and men students to the methods and concepts of gender studies, women’s studies, and feminist theory. An interdisciplinary course, it covers approaches used in literary criticism, history, philosophy, political science, sociology, anthropology, psychology, film studies, cultural studies, art history, and religion. It is the required introductory course for students taking the women’s studies major. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100.
Offered as ENGL 270, HSTY 270, PHIL 270, RLGN 270, and WGST 201.
Global & Cultural Diversity


HSTY 272. Sports in America: From Play to Profit (3)
This course reviews the history of sports in America from the colonial period to the present. It gives particular attention to the evolution of sports as a major business and to the roles of gender, ethnicity, and race in the history of America sport, as well as to the emergence of sport as a major defining characteristic of America life and society.


HSTY 282. Modern China (3)
Beginning with the Opium Wars, we review the historical development of intellectual discourse, public reaction, and political protest in late Imperial and Republican China from the early 19th century to the communist revolution in 1949. In contrast to the conventional description of China from a Western point of view, this course tries to explain the emergence of modern China in the context of its intellectual, political, and socio-economic transformation as experienced by Chinese in the 19th and 20th century. By discussing the influence of the West, domestic rebellions, and political radicalism, we examine how the Chinese state and society interacted in search for modernization and reforms, how these reforms were continued during the Republican period, and to what extent historical patterns can be identified in China’s present-day development.
Global & Cultural Diversity


HSTY 284. Daily Life in Imperial China (3)
This course is an interdisciplinary study of Chinese society using methodological approaches from the fields of social, cultural, economic, and art history. In order to explore the fabric of society in Imperial China (from the beginning to the early 20th century) in a creative, interactive way--including folk customs, life at the court, in city and countryside, religious activities, gender roles, material culture, consumption, entertainment, and social hierarchies--we use the excellent Chinese collection in the Cleveland Museum of Art and various visual aids such as slides and CD-ROMs in the classroom.
Offered as ASIA 284 and HSTY 284.
Global & Cultural Diversity


HSTY 285. Modern Japan (3)
This course introduces students to the many changes that characterize the social, political, economic, and intellectual history of modern Japan from the mid-19th century to the present. We discuss to what extent the Meiji state was built upon Japan’s “traditional” heritage, how modernization and Western influence were implemented in and perceived by society, and which factors led the government to adopt extreme imperialist and militarist policies in the early 20th century. Looking at the emergence of a new Japan after World War II, we focus on employment structures, mass culture, urbanization, gender roles, and social patterns in order to understand the transformation of modern Japanese society.
Global & Cultural Diversity


HSTY 287. State, War, Drugs, and Coffee in Colombia: History of Modern Colombia (3)
This course will analyze the major forces that have shaped Colombian history from the 19th century to the present. Colombia is one of the largest and most fascinating countries in Latin America. It has been intricately linked to the U.S. market as a major coffee producer and, more recently, as a major supplier of illicit drugs. Colombia has always been one of the wealthier Latin American countries, and it has a high degree of electoral democracy. Paradoxically, however, Colombia has also experienced rather high levels of regionalism and political violence. This course seeks to explore the history of these paradoxes. It will situate Colombia’s contemporary conflicts within a larger historical perspective.
Offered as ETHS 287 and HSTY 287.
Global & Cultural Diversity


HSTY 298. Departmental Seminar (3)
The Department of History Departmental Seminar. A topical course, emphasizing disciplinary forms of writing, it is recommended for students before the end of their junior years. The class will advance the goals of SAGES within the disciplinary context of history by focusing on close readings of texts, analytical writing, and intensive seminar-style classroom discussions.
SAGES Dept Seminar


HSTY 299. Topics in History (3)
Subject matter will vary with instructor but will focus on some particular topic or historical approach. Course description available from departmental office.


HSTY 302. Ancient Greece: Archaic, Classical, and Hellenistic Periods (3)
The rise of Hellenic thought and institutions from the eighth to the third centuries B.C., the rise of the polis, the evolution of democracy at Athens, the crises of the Persian and Peloponnesian Wars, fifth century historiography, the growth of individualism, and the revival of monarchy in the Hellenistic period.
Offered as CLSC 302 and HSTY 302.


HSTY 303. History of the Early Church: First Through Fourth Centuries (3)
Explores the development of the diverse traditions of Christianity in the Roman Empire from the first through the fourth centuries C.E. A variety of New Testament and extra-Biblical sources are examined in translation. Emphasis is placed on the place of Christianity in the larger Roman society, and the variety of early Christian ideals of salvation, the Church, and Church leadership.
Offered as HSTY 303 and RLGN 373.


HSTY 304. Ancient Rome: Republic and Empire (3)
Growth and development of the Roman state from the unification of Italy in the early third century B.C. to the establishment of the oriental despotism under Diocletian and Constantine. The growth of empire in the Punic Wars, the uncertain steps toward an eastern hegemony, the crisis in the Republic from the Gracchi to Caesar, the new regime of Augustus, the transformation of the leadership class in the early Empire, and the increasing dominance of the military over the civil structure.
Offered as CLSC 304 and HSTY 304.


HSTY 306. History Museums: Theory and Reality (3)
This course is an intensive summer internship (10 hours per week) at the Western Reserve Historical Society, complemented by extensive readings in museum/archival theory and public historical perception. It is designed both to introduce students to museum/archival work and to compare theoretical concepts with actual museum situations. Interns will be assigned a specific project within one of the Society’s curatorial or administrative divisions, but will have the opportunity to work on ancillary tasks throughout the Historical Society’s headquarters in University Circle.
Offered as HSTY 306 and HSTY 406.


HSTY 307. Development of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (3)
The development of chemical ideas; theories of matter, composition, structure, and reaction; the application of chemistry and chemical theory from antiquity to the 20th century; all considered in social context.


HSTY 308. Italian Renaissance 1350-1600 (3)
Political and cultural history of Renaissance Italy. Florence, Venice, Rome, and the development of Humanism. Extensive reading of major writers such as Machiavelli.


HSTY 309. Reformation Europe, 1500-1650 (3)
Origins and development of Protestantism, the Catholic Counter-Reformation, and the interaction between secular power and religious identity in Christian Europe.
Offered as HSTY 309 and RLGN 374.


HSTY 310. The French Revolutionary Era (3)
Causes, progress, and results of the internal transformation of France from 1789 to 1815; impact of revolutionary ideas on other European and non-European societies.


HSTY 311. Seminar: Modern American Historiography (3)
This seminar examines the approaches that professional historians of the United States have taken to the writing of American history in the past fifty years, with emphasis on changes in historical concerns, master debates among historians, and contemporary interests. Topics covered include national politics and government, economic development, social history, the history of ethnicity, race, and gender, and foreign policy and international relations. Each student will read widely and will prepare a series of reports on selected books and authors.
Offered as HSTY 311 and HSTY 411.


HSTY 312. European Legal History (3)
Examines the development of the legal systems of Central and Western Europe since the reception of Roman law. Focus will fall upon the alliance of Roman law and the absolutist state, the rise of bureaucratic absolutism, codification and the rise of liberal constitutional and legal thought, the Central European Rechtsstaat tradition, the historical school and legal positivism, the differing trajectories of development of bars in private practice, and the shape of modern European civil law systems, all in their social contexts.


HSTY 314. Impostors in Early Modern Europe (3)
Religious persecution during the early modern period (16th-18th centuries) compelled Jews to attend Mass, Muslims to baptize their children and Protestants of count Hail Marys on a rosary. European exploration of Asia, Africa and the Americas inspired an Englishman to pass himself off as Taiwanese and an African to present himself as a European. The choice between marriage and a convent led one woman to cut off her hair, sew her skirt into britches and make herself into a conquistador in Peru. In pursuit of social mobility, courtiers remade themselves to suit the conventions of the court. Posing, passing and pretending, these early modern Europeans crossed lines of religion, gender, race and class. Today we might call some of these figures impostors but praise others as self-made men and women. What was the difference between lying and self-fashioning in early modern Europe? What forces and phenomena compelled people to remake themselves? Was the early modern period the age of dissimulation? This course explores these questions by reading memoirs, handbooks, inquisitorial documents and plays from the period of light of contemporary theoretical literature.


HSTY 315. Heresy and Dissidence in the Middle Ages (3)
Survey of heretical individuals and groups in Western Europe from 500 - 1500 A.D., focusing on popular rather than academic heresies. The development of intolerance in medieval society and the problems of doing history from hostile sources will also be explored.
Offered as HSTY 315 and RLGN 315.


HSTY 318. History of Black Women in the U.S. (3)
Chronologically arranged around specific issues in black women’s history organizations, participation in community and political movements, labor experiences, and expressive culture. The course will use a variety of materials, including autobiography, literature, music, and film.
Offered as ETHS 318, HSTY 318, and WGST 318.


HSTY 319. The Crusades (3)
This course is a survey of the history of the idea of “crusade,” the expeditions of Western Europeans to the East known as crusades, the Muslim and Eastern Christian cultures against which these movements were directed, as well as the culture of the Latin East and other consequences of these crusades.
Offered as HSTY 319 and RLGN 319.


HSTY 322. Feminist Theory, Women’s History, Gender History (3)
A reading seminar designed to expose students to current theory and methods in feminist history, as well as feminist scholarship more generally. It includes a variety of topics representative of interests and concerns shared by feminist historians, as well as a range of methodological approaches and theoretical debates. The course aims to impart a sense of the ways in which feminist theory has been applied to and has transformed historical scholarship.
Offered as HSTY 322, WGST 322, HSTY 422, and WGST 422.


HSTY 325. U.S. Politics, Culture, and Society: 1787-1865 (3)
Explores politics, culture, and society in the United States between the War for Independence and the Civil War. Topics include the transformation of political ideology, the political process, capitalist development in cities, factories, and the countryside, and changing dynamics of class, race, and gender in both the North and South.


HSTY 327. Comparative Environmental History (3)
Environmental history is the study of how humans have influenced the environments around them and how the environment itself has influenced the course of human societies. This course provides students with the skill to identify and analyze these interactions. It introduces course participants to the main themes of environmental history literature and the driving questions guiding environmental history research by examining case studies drawn around the globe, including Pre-Columbian America, Medieval Japan, Colonial Africa, and Modern Germany. This course will help course participants recognize the important patterns and developments that have led to present day human-environmental relationships.
Offered as HSTY 327 and HSTY 427.


HSTY 329. Museums and Globalization (3)
Museums are everywhere contested spaces today. Historically designed as agents of public education and community formation, now they are centers of public controversy on a global scale. From Paris to Nairobi museums figure in conflicts over urban redevelopment, national identity, cultural diversity, and global tourism. Questions we will consider in this course: what are the fundamental features of museums as institutions; how have they been structured; what ties have linked them to wider national and international communities, political, economic and social concerns; how have they used resources such as research, collecting, buildings, display technologies, and geographic location to carry out these functions; how do museums in Asia, Africa the Middle East and Latin America figure in the current international contention over the issue of heritage: This is an innovative course offered jointly by JHU and CWRU using web-based technologies that allow students to collaborate on projects and access museums across the globe through internet resources with “visitors” from other countries participating on-line and students buildings web links for their presentations and written projects. This is an innovative course using web-based technologies that allow discussions between students and “visitors” from other countries, as well as student collaboration on projects and access to museums across the globe through internet resources. Offered as HSTY 329 and HSTY 429.


HSTY 332. European Diplomacy in the Age of Nationalism: 1789-1945 (3)
Presents a broad interpretation of the development of the international system in Europe between the French Revolution of 1789 and the end of the European era in 1945. It explains why and how the closed European state system at the beginning of the nineteenth century evolved into an international transcontinental system by the early twentieth century. Approved SAGES Departmental Seminar.
SAGES Dept Seminar


HSTY 334. History of 19th Century Germany (3)
Examines the political, social, economic, and cultural history of Germany from the late eighteenth century to 1914. Explores the intellectual and social background to the rise of German liberalism and nationalism, the struggle with bureaucratic absolutism, the revolutions of 1848, industrial capitalism and the emergence of a class society, unification under Bismarck, the role of the state, culture, religion, and changes of mentality, the development of mass politics, and the coming of World War I.


HSTY 335. History of 20th Century Germany (3)
Examines the tumultuous history of Germany from 1914 to the unification of the two Germanys in 1989-1990. From the totalizing and traumatic experience of World War I, through a failed revolution, the republican experiment of Weimar, the National Socialist dictatorship under Hitler and the divided Germany suspended between the superpowers, to the newly unified democratic Federal Republic. Examines the ways in which Germans have tried to reconcile the state to their society, economy, and individual lives.


HSTY 336. The Struggle for Justice in Latin America (3)
This course looks at how indigenous peoples, women, students, workers, peasants, and Afro-Latin Americans struggled for justice in Latin America. It will study how notions of justice have changed from colonial times to the present. It will also examine how different sectors of Latin American society understood the meaning of justice and how that understanding evolved through time. This class seeks to familiarize students with the history of the idea of justice in Latin America. At the end of this course students will understand the complex intellectual and political differences behind Latin America’s apparent chaotic and tumultuous political history. Second, it seeks to develop students’ critical thinking by examining how an abstract term, such as justice, changes across time and space.
Offered as ETHS 336 and HSTY 336.
Global & Cultural Diversity


HSTY 342. Water (3)
This seminar will explore the history of the meaning of water--that is, the social, cultural, and/or political significance placed on water by individuals and governments in different times and places. It will also examine how humans have acted upon water, and how it has acted upon humans, with great consequences for human life. This seminar will look at the history of water in the context of science, technology and society; public health; political science; and environmental history. Case studies will be drawn from a wide chronological and geographical range; from the ancient world to Renaissance Italy, nineteenth century India, modern Britain, Egypt, and the U.S. The course provides a wide perspective on the themes of the history of human-water interactions, but will also focus closely on some critical cases. Seminar participants will write a research paper on the topic of their choice in the environmental history of water.
Offered as: HSTY 342, HSTY 442, POSC 342, POSC 442.


HSTY 344. Origins of the British Empire 1450-1750 (3)
How did early modern England come to rule an empire upon which the sun never set? What compelled individuals to seek their fortunes abroad, planting the flag of St. George in the outlying areas of the archipelago and halfway across the globe? This course examines the troubled birth of an empire and of a place called “Britain” at the same time. This seminar provides history majors with an experience of working with early modern primary documents of a wide variety; essays and book chapters will be paired with documents from early modern England itself. How do documents, images, and quantitative analyses help historians explain how the British Empire came into being?
Offered as HSTY 344 and HSTY 444.


HSTY 348. History of Modern Political and Social Thought (3)
This course explores the responses of philosophers, economic theorists, culture critics, and public policy makers to changes in western society wrought by industrialization by focusing on their concerns with technological change.
Offered as HSTY 348 and POSC 348.


HSTY 351. Colonial America 1607-1763 (3)
The formative years of American society and culture. Slavery and racism, expansionism, regionalism, the family, pluralism, sense of mission, and republican ideology.


HSTY 352. The Era of the American Revolution, 1763 - 1815 (3)
The causes and consequences of the American Revolution, the formation of the American Republic, and the early years of the new nation. Federalism and republicanism as theories and in application, and the role of the Americans’ experience in the age of democratic revolutions.


HSTY 353. Women in American History I (3)
The images and realities of women’s social, political, and economic lives in early America. Uses primary documents and biographers to observe individuals and groups of women in relation to legal, religious, and social restrictions.
Offered as HSTY 353, WGST 353, and HSTY 453.


HSTY 354. Women in American History II (3)
With HSTY 353, forms a two-semester introduction to women’s studies. The politics of suffrage and the modern woman’s efforts to balance marriage, motherhood, and career. (HSTY 353 not a prerequisite.)
Offered as HSTY 354, WGST 354, and HSTY 454.


HSTY 355. Age of American Civil War 1815-80 (3)
This course examines the causes and consequences of the Civil War, focusing on the rise of sectionalism, the dynamics of conflict, and reconstruction. Heavy emphasis is placed on archival research in relevant first person accounts from the period.


HSTY 356. Industrial America: 1880-1940 (3)
The social, economic, and political adaptation of American society to the industrial age. The impact of industrialism on such recurrent historical problems as technological change, race relations, social reform, urbanization, and political participation.


HSTY 358. America Since 1940 (3)
A comprehensive introduction to the recent history of the Unites States, organized around changes in national policy and politics. Special emphasis on the impact of World War II and the Cold War; the expansion of the federal government through the Great Society and beyond; the Civil Rights and Women’s Rights movements; challenges to the legitimacy of politics; and the efforts to maintain economic growth.


HSTY 360. American Foreign Policy since 1900 (3)
The underlying economic, political, and cultural forces that influenced policy formation from the end of the Spanish-American War through the aftermath of the Vietnam War. The development and function of the national and international apparatus of foreign relations from the consular service, world court and cartels to the CIA, United Nations, and international corporations.


HSTY 361. Crime and Popular Culture in Early America (3)
This course explores the intersection of crime, punishment, and popular culture in colonial British America and the early United States through 1860 by closely examining a series of popular crime genres, including execution sermons, criminal conversion narratives, criminal autobiographies, and trial reports. Readings in modern scholarship--drawing on several disciplines--will shed light on the popular literature and on underlying patterns of crime and punishment, while students will critically evaluate modern scholarly interpretations in light of the early crime publications. Types of crimes explored in the readings include witchcraft, piracy, burglary, robbery, and various types of murder, such as infanticide, familicide (cases of men murdering their wives and children), and sexual homicide. Each student will write several short analytical papers drawn from the shared readings and, at the end of the semester, produce an independent research paper.
Offered as HSTY 361 and HSTY 461.


HSTY 362. American Social and Cultural History since 1865 (3)
History of the nationalization of new economic, political, social, scientific, and aesthetic ideas and their embodiment in the development of professions, social movements, and cultural institutions.


HSTY 364. City, Town, and Suburban American History (3)
Nearly all Americans now live in the big cities, suburbs, and nearby towns of large metropolitan regions; one hundred years ago most Americans lived in the countryside. This course explores the rise of cities and metropolitan regions as the settings for American life. It considers the timing of the urban and suburban movements, explanations for urbanization and suburbanization, and the changing character of city, suburban, and small town life. The course pays special attention to the consequences of urban and metropolitan growth for economic opportunity, for metropolitan government, for social life and conflict, and for cultural expression and cultural change.


HSTY 366. Science, Technology, and Government (3)
Traces the development and influence of federal technology and science policies from colonial times to the present, with emphasis on the 20th century.
Offered as HSTY 366 and POSC 365.


HSTY 368. Modern American Legal History (3)
Examines the workings of the modern American legal system from the Civil War to the present. Focus on the relationships between the law and social, economic, and professional change. Lectures, discussions, and analysis of legal documents.


HSTY 373. Advanced Topics in American Women’s History (3)
This advanced seminar is designed to allow students to investigate aspects of American women’s history that are not deeply explored in other courses. The two central purposes of the course are to move students forward in their study of American women’s history and to provide advanced study for graduate students and other students interested in women-focused topics. The topic is subject to change, but may be any of the following or something similar: women and medicine, images of women in popular culture, growing up female, women and political movements, women and war, etc. Recommended preparation: HSTY 353/453 or HSTY 354/454.
Offered as HSTY 373, WGST 373, and HSTY 473.


HSTY 377. Nuclear Weapons and Arms Control (3)
National and international problems concerning nuclear weapons, and the past and present attempts both to control their spread and to prevent their use. Topics covered include the science and technology of fission and fusion warheads and delivery vehicles; history, domestic policies, and international relations concerning nuclear weapons; and arms control treaties and their verification.
Offered as HSTY 377 and POSC 375.


HSTY 378. Environmental History of North America (3)
Explores the way nature has shaped history as well as the ecological consequences of development. Focus is on the relationship between the natural and the cultural with special attention to such topics as economic growth, wilderness, disease, environmental justice, and the conquest of the American West.


HSTY 379. America in the ‘50s (3)
American life and culture in the decade of Elvis, Eisenhower, McCarthy and the beginnings of the Civil Rights Movement. Films, novels and recordings will supplement lectures and discussions on such topics as the Cold War, conformity, the role of women, television, the Korean War, and beatniks.


HSTY 380. The Sixties in America (3)
This course examines social, cultural, and political changes in the United States during the 1960s. We begin by examining the economic prosperity and “fragile” political consensus of the post-WWII period, as well as the undercurrent of poverty, dissent, and Cold War fears. We then cover the civil rights movement, student activism, the women’s movement, the growth of Liberal America and the welfare state, the Vietnam War, the counterculture and conservative youth movements, the growth of a national consumer-driven, mass-mediated market, and the music, art, and pop culture--as well as their growing reliance on technological intervention--during this period of creative efflorescence. We will do this through reading books, but also through “reading” contemporary evidence of life in America, including listening to music, viewing films, analyzing pictures and artifacts.


HSTY 381. City as Classroom (3)
In this course, the city is the classroom. We will engage with the urban terrain. We will meet weekly off-campus, interact with community members, and interface--both literally and figuratively--with the city as a way to examine the linkages between historical, conceptual, and contemporary issues, with particular attention paid to race and class dynamics, inequality, and social justice. This course will have four intersecting components, primarily focusing on American cities since the 1930s: the social and physical construction of urban space, the built environment, life and culture in the city, and social movements and grassroots struggles.
Offered as HSTY 381, POSC 381, SOCI 381, HSTY 481, POSC 481, and SOCI 481.


HSTY 382. Chinese Business and Economic History (3)
This course explores China’s business and economic history from the opening of the treaty ports in the early 19th century to the post-war socialist economy, the market reforms in the 1980s and 1990s, and the most recent developments in the context of China’s social political transformation. One major focus of the course is a comparative approach to the issue of industrialization and the introduction of modern enterprises and economic structures into China. By examining the socio-economic background of Chinese business from family and personal networks to property rights, students learn about the institutional, cultural, and social aspects which are still relevant for business transactions and institutions in China today.


HSTY 383. The People’s Republic of China (3)
Now more than ever, the Chinese state and society are facing tremendous economic, social, and political challenges. This course presents an overview of the development of Chinese Communist theory and practice from 1949 to the present day. Among the topics covered are the Great Leap Forward, the Cultural Revolution, the economic reforms of the 1980s, the Tiananmen student protests, the Communist party’s crisis of legitimacy, the Taiwan problem, ecological challenges, the new socialist market economy, and current social developments from domestic migration to youth culture and new forms of nationalism. The class involves a mixture of lectures and discussion and draws on a combination of primary and secondary sources, including current news reports, films, documentaries, and fiction in translation.
Offered as HSTY 383 and POSC 368.


HSTY 390. Senior Research Seminars in History and Philosophy of Science (3)
Directed independent research seminar for seniors who are majors in the History and Philosophy of Science program. The goal of the course is to develop and demonstrate command of B.A.-level factual content, methodologies, research strategies, historiography, and theory relevant to the field of history of science and/or philosophy of science. The course includes both written and oral components.
Offered as HSTY 380 and PHIL 390.
SAGES Senior Cap


HSTY 391. Food in History (3)
Food is inextricably interconnected with the development of agriculture and other technologies, with the rise and fall of empires, with increasing understanding of diet and nutrition, with laws and regulations, with the arts, with economic development and consumer culture, and with religious and ethnic identities. By examining selective and representative episodes pertaining to each of these topics, this course explores the global history of food, from the agricultural revolution of the neolithic era to the consumer revolution of the last generation.
Offered as HSTY 391 and HSTY 491.


HSTY 394. Seminar in Evolutionary Biology (3)
This seminar investigates 20th-century evolutionary theory, especially the Modern Evolutionary synthesis and subsequent expansions of and challenges to that synthesis. The course encompasses the multidisciplinary nature of the science of evolution, demonstrating how disciplinary background influences practitioners’ conceptualizations of pattern and process. This course emphasizes practical writing and research skills, including formulation of testable theses, grant proposal techniques, and the implementation of original research using the facilities on campus and at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History.
Offered as ANTH 394, BIOL 394, GEOL 394, HSTY 394, PHIL 394, ANTH 494, BIOL 494, GEOL 494, HSTY 494, and PHIL 494.


HSTY 395. History of Medicine (3)
This course treats selected topics in the history of medicine, with an emphasis on social and cultural history. Focusing on the modern period, we examine illnesses, patients, and healers, with attention to the ways sickness and medicine touch larger questions of politics, social relations and identity.
Offered as HSTY 395 and HSTY 495.


HSTY 397. Undergraduate Tutorial (1-3)
Individual instruction with members of the history faculty. Recommended preparation: 12 hours of History.


HSTY 398. Senior Research Seminar (3)
Training in the nature and methods of historical writing and research.
Prereq: Majors only, Senior standing.
SAGES Senior Cap


HSTY 399. Advanced Readings in Black History (3)
This is an advanced readings course that may change from semester to semester. This course will provide students with an opportunity to more deeply explore special themes and theoretical issues in the field of black history that are often quickly and briefly covered in broad survey courses. Readings may be organized around specific topics such as resistance and social protest, black intellectual history, black nationalism and identity, black film and historical literacy black cultural forms and politics, black urban history, or some such other combination. Students may take this course more than once and receive credit as long as the course topic differs. Students should contact the History Department for more details on course content during any given semester. Offered as HSTY 399, HSTY 499.


HSTY 400. Graduate Topical Seminar (3)
A rotating graduate seminar, offered every semester by a different faculty member. Each semester focuses on a topic of central historiographical or methodological importance.


HSTY 402. Survey of the History of Science (3)
A graduate-level historiographic review of the history of the sciences from the seventeenth century to the present.


HSTY 404. Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector (3)
The United States has by far the largest and most important “nonprofit sector” in the world, a sector consisting of voluntary non-governmental organizations that provide health care, education and social services as well as arts, religious, and advocacy activities. Using mostly primary sources, this course considers the significance of the nonprofit sector in the U.S., its advantages and disadvantages, its uses for different groups of Americans, and current trends. Students have the option of writing either a standard term paper, or a study of strategic challenges facing a contemporary nonprofit organization.
Offered as HSTY 204 and HSTY 404.


HSTY 406. History Museums: Theory and Reality (3)
This course is an intensive summer internship (10 hours per week) at the Western Reserve Historical Society, complemented by extensive readings in museum/archival theory and public historical perception. It is designed both to introduce students to museum/archival work and to compare theoretical concepts with actual museum situations. Interns will be assigned a specific project within one of the Society’s curatorial or administrative divisions, but will have the opportunity to work on ancillary tasks throughout the Historical Society’s headquarters in University Circle.
Offered as HSTY 306 and HSTY 406.


HSTY 410. Seminar: Early American Historiography (3)
This seminar examines the historiography of early America. It is designed to acquaint history doctoral students with the major themes, methods, and scholars of American history from the seventeenth century to the mid-nineteenth century. Students will be expected to read and report on major works in the field.


HSTY 411. Seminar: Modern American Historiography (3)
This seminar examines the approaches that professional historians of the United States have taken to the writing of American history in the past fifty years, with emphasis on changes in historical concerns, master debates among historians, and contemporary interests. Topics covered include national politics and government, economic development, social history, the history of ethnicity, race, and gender, and foreign policy and international relations. Each student will read widely and will prepare a series of reports on selected books and authors.
Offered as HSTY 311 and HSTY 411.


HSTY 422. Feminist Theory, Women’s History, Gender History (3)
A reading seminar designed to expose students to current theory and methods in feminist history, as well as feminist scholarship more generally. It includes a variety of topics representative of interests and concerns shared by feminist historians, as well as a range of methodological approaches and theoretical debates. The course aims to impart a sense of the ways in which feminist theory has been applied to and has transformed historical scholarship.
Offered as HSTY 322, WGST 322, HSTY 422, and WGST 422.


HSTY 427. Comparative Environmental History (3)
Environmental history is the study of how humans have influenced the environments around them and how the environment itself has influenced the course of human societies. This course provides students with the skill to identify and analyze these interactions. It introduces course participants to the main themes of environmental history literature and the driving questions guiding environmental history research by examining case studies drawn around the globe, including Pre-Columbian America, Medieval Japan, Colonial Africa, and Modern Germany. This course will help course participants recognize the important patterns and developments that have led to present day human-environmental relationships.
Offered as HSTY 327 and HSTY 427.


HSTY 429. Museums and Globalization
Museums are everywhere contested spaces today. Historically designed as agents of public education and community formation, now they are centers of public controversy on a global scale. From Paris to Nairobi museums figure in conflicts over urban redevelopment, national identity, cultural diversity, and global tourism. Questions we will consider in this course: what are the fundamental features of museums as institutions; how have they been structured; what ties have linked them to wider national and international communities, political, economic and social concerns; how have they used resources such as research, collecting, buildings, display technologies, and geographic location to carry out these functions; how do museums in Asia, Africa the Middle East and Latin America figure in the current international contention over the issue of heritage: This is an innovative course offered jointly by JHU and CWRU using web-based technologies that allow students to collaborate on projects and access museums across the globe through internet resources with “visitors” from other countries participating on-line and students buildings web links for their presentations and written projects. This is an innovative course using web-based technologies that allow discussions between students and “visitors” from other countries, as well as student collaboration on projects and access to museums across the globe through internet resources.
Offered as HSTY 329 and HSTY 429.


HSTY 440. Science and Society Through Literature (3)
This course will examine the interaction of scientific investigation and discovery with the society it occurred in. What is the effect of science on society and, as importantly, what is the effect of society on science? An introduction will consider the heliocentric controversy with focus on Galileo. Two broad areas, tuberculosis and the Frankenstein myth, will then be discussed covering the period 1800-present. With tuberculosis, fiction, art and music will be examined to understand the changing views of society towards the disease, how society’s perception of tuberculosis victims changed, and how this influenced their treatments and research. With Frankenstein, the original novel in its historical context will be examined. Using fiction and film, the transformation of the original story into myth with different connotations and implications will be discussed. Most classes will be extensive discussions coupled with student presentations of assigned materials.
Offered as PHRM 340, BETH 440, PHRM 440, and HSTY 440.


HSTY 442. Water (3)
This seminar will explore the history of the meaning of water--that is, the social, cultural, and/or political significance placed on water by individuals and governments in different times and places. It will also examine how humans have acted upon water, and how it has acted upon humans, with great consequences for human life. This seminar will look at the history of water in the context of science, technology and society; public health; political science; and environmental history. Case studies will be drawn from a wide chronological and geographical range; from the ancient world to Renaissance Italy, nineteenth century India, modern Britain, Egypt, and the U.S. The course provides a wide perspective on the themes of the history of human-water interactions, but will also focus closely on some critical cases. Seminar participants will write a research paper on the topic of their choice in the environmental history of water.
Offered as: HSTY 342, HSTY 442, POSC 342, POSC 442.


HSTY 451. Seminar in the History of European Technology (3)
A graduate-level, research seminar on the history of European technology from the Industrial Revolution to the present. Special emphasis is on cultural history of technology with a transatlantic view. The themes of the seminar vary from year to year, but include: communications, industrialization, control, cultural and intellectual approaches to the history of technology. Required work includes a research paper based on original sources.


HSTY 452. Readings in the History of American Technology (3)
A graduate-level review of the history of American technology.


HSTY 453. Women in American History I (3)
The images and realities of women’s social, political, and economic lives in early America. Uses primary documents and biographers to observe individuals and groups of women in relation to legal, religious, and social restrictions.
Offered as HSTY 353, WGST 353, and HSTY 453.


HSTY 454. Women in American History II (3)
With HSTY 353, forms a two-semester introduction to women’s studies. The politics of suffrage and the modern woman’s efforts to balance marriage, motherhood, and career. (HSTY 353 not a prerequisite.)
Offered as HSTY 354, WGST 354, and HSTY 454.


HSTY 461. Crime and Popular Culture in Early America (3)
This course explores the intersection of crime, punishment, and popular culture in colonial British America and the early United States through 1860 by closely examining a series of popular crime genres, including execution sermons, criminal conversion narratives, criminal autobiographies, and trial reports. Readings in modern scholarship--drawing on several disciplines--will shed light on the popular literature and on underlying patterns of crime and punishment, while students will critically evaluate modern scholarly interpretations in light of the early crime publications. Types of crimes explored in the readings include witchcraft, piracy, burglary, robbery, and various types of murder, such as infanticide, familicide (cases of men murdering their wives and children), and sexual homicide. Each student will write several short analytical papers drawn from the shared readings and, at the end of the semester, produce an independent research paper.
Offered as HSTY 361 and HSTY 461.


HSTY 470. Historiography, Method, and Theory (3)
a graduate level survey of fundamental themes in historiography, method, and theory, as well as interdisciplinary methods and theories.


HSTY 473. Advanced Topics in American Women’s History (3)
This advanced seminar is designed to allow students to investigate aspects of American women’s history that are not deeply explored in other courses. The two central purposes of the course are to move students forward in their study of American women’s history and to provide advanced study for graduate students and other students interested in women-focused topics. The topic is subject to change, but may be any of the following or something similar: women and medicine, images of women in popular culture, growing up female, women and political movements, women and war, etc. Recommended preparation: HSTY 353/453 or HSTY 354/454.
Offered as HSTY 373, WGST 373, and HSTY 473.


HSTY 476. Seminar in Comparative History (3)
An introduction to comparative method for historians. The topics will vary year to year, but the course will require exposure to historical contexts outside of the United States.


HSTY 477. Modern Policy History of the United States (3)
This course offers a historical perspective on policy and policy making in the United States since the late nineteenth century. It emphasizes the increasing role of the federal government, the persisting importance of the states, the significance of the courts, the revolutionary impact of the women’s and civil rights movements, and the consequences of the growth and transformation of the American economy. Each student selects a policy area for detailed exploration; students often choose topics related to civil rights, women’s rights, health care, environmental reform, non-profit and non-governmental organizations, the arts, and education, but other topics are also appropriate.


HSTY 479. Historical Research and Writing (3)
A research seminar for historians. Students will produce a research paper based on primary sources. There will be substantial attention to the mechanics of writing.


HSTY 480. Public Policy and Aging (3)
Overview of aging and the aged. Concepts in the study of public policy. Policies on aging and conditions that they address. The politics of policies on aging. Emergent trends and issues.
Offered as ANTH 498, BETH 496, EPBI 408, GERO 496, HSTY 480, MPHP 408, NURS 479, NURS 579, POSC 480, and SOCI 496.


HSTY 481. City as Classroom (3)
In this course, the city is the classroom. We will engage with the urban terrain. We will meet weekly off-campus, interact with community members, and interface--both literally and figuratively--with the city as a way to examine the linkages between historical, conceptual, and contemporary issues, with particular attention paid to race and class dynamics, inequality, and social justice. This course will have four intersecting components, primarily focusing on American cities since the 1930s: the social and physical construction of urban space, the built environment, life and culture in the city, and social movements and grassroots struggles.
Offered as HSTY 381, POSC 381, SOCI 381, HSTY 481, POSC 481, and SOCI 481.


HSTY 491. Food in History (3)
Food is inextricably interconnected with the development of agriculture and other technologies, with the rise and fall of empires, with increasing understanding of diet and nutrition, with laws and regulations, with the arts, with economic development and consumer culture, and with religious and ethnic identities. By examining selective and representative episodes pertaining to each of these topics, this course explores the global history of food, from the agricultural revolution of the neolithic era to the consumer revolution of the last generation.
Offered as HSTY 391 and HSTY 491.


HSTY 494. Seminar in Evolutionary Biology (3)
This seminar investigates 20th-century evolutionary theory, especially the Modern Evolutionary synthesis and subsequent expansions of and challenges to that synthesis. The course encompasses the multidisciplinary nature of the science of evolution, demonstrating how disciplinary background influences practitioners’ conceptualizations of pattern and process. This course emphasizes practical writing and research skills, including formulation of testable theses, grant proposal techniques, and the implementation of original research using the facilities on campus and at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History.
Offered as ANTH 394, BIOL 394, GEOL 394, HSTY 394, PHIL 394, ANTH 494, BIOL 494, GEOL 494, HSTY 494, and PHIL 494.


HSTY 495. History of Medicine (3)
This course treats selected topics in the history of medicine, with an emphasis on social and cultural history. Focusing on the modern period, we examine illnesses, patients, and healers, with attention to the ways sickness and medicine touch larger questions of politics, social relations and identity.
Offered as HSTY 395 and HSTY 495.


HSTY 497. Graduate Independent Study (1-3)
Independent reading and research programs with individual members of the faculty.


HSTY 499. Advanced Readings in Black History (3)
This is an advanced readings course that may change from semester to semester. This course will provide students with an opportunity to more deeply explore special themes and theoretical issues in the field of black history that are often quickly and briefly covered in broad survey courses. Readings may be organized around specific topics such as resistance and social protest, black intellectual history, black nationalism and identity, black film and historical literacy black cultural forms and politics, black urban history, or some such other combination. Students may take this course more than once and receive credit as long as the course topic differs. Students should contact the History Department for more details on course content during any given semester. Offered as HSTY 399, HSTY 499.


HSTY 525. Intellectual Property and the Construction of Authorship (3)
“Authorship” and “invention” are among the West’s most powerful ideas--the categories by which creative production has been defined and valued for the last two centuries. We will investigate the emergence and consolidation of these ideas in the context of some of the institutions, technologies, and practices that have fostered and been fostered by them, such as printing and publishing, copyright and patent law, education curricula and disciplinary pedagogies. Then we will turn our attention to the varieties of authorship and invention in operation today--from the solitary ethos characteristic of the arts and humanities to the collaborative, even corporate, forms in ascendance in science and industry. How are ideas of authorship and invention employed in the various discursive spheres to assign credit and responsibility? May tensions be found with creative practice? What are the stakes? Who wins, who loses? And what will be the consequences of digitization and globalization? Our study will culminate in attendance at an interdisciplinary conference on “Con/texts of Invention” which will take place at Case Western Reserve on April 21-23. The goal of our study will be to identify worthy research topics within students’ own areas of interest.
Offered as ENGL 525 and HSTY 525.


HSTY 601. Independent Studies (1-18)
(Credit as arranged.)


HSTY 611. Introduction to Historiography (3)
Required seminar for all M.A. and Ph.D. students. Introduces students to historiographical and methodological issues. Recommended preparation: Graduate standing.


HSTY 651. Thesis M.A. (1-18)
(Credit as arranged.)


HSTY 701. Dissertation Ph.D. (1-18)
(Credit as arranged.) Limited to Ph.D. candidates actively engaged in the research and writing of their dissertations.
Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.