Department of Macromolecular Science and Engineering


314 Kent Smith Building (7202)
Phone: 216-368-4172; Fax: 216-368-4202
Gary E. Wnek, Chair
e-mail: gew5@case.edu
David A. Schiraldi, Associate Chair
e-mail: das44@case.edu
http://polymers.case.edu

 

Macromolecular science and engineering is the study of the synthesis, structure, processing, and properties of polymers. These giant molecules are the basis of synthetic materials including plastics, fibers, rubber, films, paints, membranes, and adhesives. Research is constantly expanding these applications through the development of new high performance polymers, e.g. for engineering composites, electronic, optical, and biomedical uses. In addition, most biological systems are composed of macromolecules—proteins (e.g. silk, wool, tendon), carbohydrates (e.g. cellulose) and nucleic acids (RNA and DNA) are polymers and are studied by the same methods that are applied to synthetic polymers.


Production of polymers and their components is central to the chemical industry, and statistics show that over 75 percent of all chemists and chemical engineers in industry are involved with some aspect of polymers. Despite this, formal education in this area is offered by only a few universities in this country, resulting in a continued strong demand for our graduates upon completion of their B.S., M.S., or Ph.D. degrees.


Faculty


Gary Wnek, Ph.D.
(University of Massachusetts, Amherst)

The Joseph F. Toot, Jr., Professor and Chair
Faculty Director, The Institute for Management and Engineering (TiME)
Polymers with unusual electrical or optical properties; biomaterials for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine; electric field-mediated processing (electrospinning of nano- and micro fibers and morphology modulation in polymer blends); polymer-based microfluidic platforms; polymer product design


Eric Baer, D. Eng.
(Johns Hopkins University)

Leonard Case Professor
Irreversible microdeformation mechanisms; pressure effects on morphology and mechanical properties; relationships between hierarchical structure and mechanical function; mechanical properties of soft connective tissue; polymer composites and blends; polymerization and crystallization on crystalline surfaces; viscoelastic properties of polymer melts; damage and fracture analysis of polymers and their composites. Structure-property relationships in biological systems


John Blackwell, Ph.D.
(University of Leeds, England)

Leonard Case Jr. Professor
Determination of the solid state structure and morphology of polymers. X-ray analysis of the structure of thermotropic copolyesters, copolyimides, polyurethanes, polysaccharides; supramolecular assemblies, fluoropolymers; molecular modeling of semi-crystalline and liquid crystalline polymers; rheological properties of polysaccharides and glycoproteins


Elena Dormidontova, Ph.D.
(Moscow State University)

Climo Associate Professor for the Case School of Engineering
Statistical physics of macromolecules, phase behavior (phase stability and thermodynamic ordering) and properties of complex polymer and biopolymer systems: biocompatible and water-soluble polymers (their properties and applications for biomimetics and drug delivery), hydrogen bonded and associating polymers (reversibly associated living polymers), polymer/surfactant systems, polymer micelles (at thermodynamic equilibrium and micellization kinetics), polyelectrolytes and block copolymers


Anne Hiltner, Ph.D.
(Oregon State University)

The Herbert Henry Dow Professor
Structure-property relationships; irreversible deformation, crack propagation and fracture of polymers, blends and composites; microlayer processing of polymers; structure-function relationships in collagenous tissues; biostability of biomaterials


Hatsuo Ishida, Ph.D.
(Case Western Reserve University)

Professor
Processing of polymers and composite materials; structural analysis of surfaces and interfaces; molecular spectroscopy of synthetic polymers


Alexander M. Jamieson, D. Phil.
(Oxford University, England)

Professor
Laser light scattering; rheology and transport of macromolecules in solution and bulk and biopolymers; positron annihilation lifetime studies of free volume in polymers; electrorheological fluids; drag reduction of polymer solutions; polymer-surfactant interactions


LaShanda T. Korley, Ph.D.
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

Assistant Professor
Structure-function relationships; toughening mechanisms in segmented copolymers; spatial confinement of self-assembled materials, including biomaterials; hierarchical microstructures


Ica Manas-Zloczower, D.Sc.
(Israel Institute of Technology)

Professor and Associate Dean of Faculty Development
Structure and micromechanics of fine particle clusters; interfacial engineering strategies for advanced materials processing; dispersive mixing mechanisms and modeling; design and mixing optimization studies for polymer processing equipment through flow simulations


Stuart Rowan, Ph.D.
(University of Glasgow, UK)

Professor
Organic chemistry, synthesis, supramolecular chemistry, conducting polymers, interlocked macromolecules (polyrotaxanes and polycatenanes), peptide nucleic acids, supramolecular polymerization, reversible ‘dynamic’ chemistry and combinatorial libraries


David Schiraldi, Ph.D.
(University of Oregon)

Associate Professor
Monomer and polymer synthesis, structure-property relationships, nanocomposites, polymerization catalysis, combinatorial synthesis and testing of polymers, synthetic fibers, barrier packaging materials


Christoph Weder, Ph.D.
(ETH Zurich, Switzerland)

F. Alex Nason Professor
Design, synthesis, structure-property relationship and application of novel functional polymer systems; advanced optical applications of polymers; anisotropic polymer systems; novel polymers for thin film and fiber applications

 

Emeriti Faculty


Jack L. Koenig, Ph.D.
(University of Nebraska, Lincoln)

The Donnell Institute Professor Emeritus
Polymer structure-property relationships using infrared, Raman, NMR spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging techniques


Jerome B. Lando, Ph.D.
(Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn)

Professor Emeritus
Solid state polymerization; X-ray crystallography of polymers; electrical properties of polymers; ultra-thin polymer films


Morton Litt, Ph.D.
(Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn)

Professor Emeritus
Kinetics and mechanisms of free radical and ionic polymerization; mechanical properties of polymers; fluorocarbon chemistry; synthesis of novel monomers and polymers; polymer electrical properties; cross-linked liquid crystal polymers


Charles E. Rogers, Ph.D.
(Syracuse University and State University of New York)

Professor Emeritus
Transport and mechanical properties of polymers; synthesis and properties of multicomponent systems; environmental effect on polymers; adhesion, adhesives, and coatings


Secondary Faculty


James M. Anderson, Ph.D.
(Oregon State University), M.D.

(Case Western Reserve University)
Professor of Macromolecular Science, Pathology, and Biomedical Engineering
Development of polymers for medical and dental applications


Donald Feke, Ph.D.
(Princeton University)

Professor of Chemical Engineering, and Macromolecular Science
Fine-particle processing; colloidal phenomena; dispersive mixing; acoustic separation methods


J. Adin Mann Jr., Ph.D.
(Iowa State University)

Professor of Chemical Engineering
Surface phenomena; interfacial dynamics; light scattering; stochastic processes of adsorption and molecular rearrangement at interfaces


Roger Marchant, Ph.D.
(Case Western Reserve University)

Professor of Biomedical Engineering
Biopolymers; polymer surface coatings; properties and characterization of polymer surfaces on implants and sensors


John Protasiewicz, Ph.D.
(Cornell University)

Professor of Chemistry
Inorganic, Organic, Main Group, Materials, Polymer, Catalysis, Organometallic Chemistry, and X-ray Crystallography


Syed Qutubuddin, Ph.D.
(Carnegie-Mellon University)

Professor of Chemical Engineering
Colloids; polymers and interfacial phenomena; laser light scattering; enhanced oil recovery


Charles Rosenblatt, Ph.D.
(Harvard University)

Professor of Physics
Experimental condensed matter physics; liquid crystal physics


Kenneth Singer, Ph.D.
(University of Pennsylvania)

Professor of Physics
Nonlinear optical properties of polymers; contributions of molecular order to the nonlinear optical response in polymers; optical probes of polymer relaxation; formation of and propagation of light in polymer waveguides


Philip Taylor, Ph.D.
(Cambridge University, England)

Perkins Professor of Physics
Phase transitions and equations of state for crystalline polymers; piezoelectricity and pyroelectricity


Horst von Recum, Ph.D.
(University of Utah, Salt Lake City)

Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering
Novel platforms for the delivery of molecules and cells and the use of novel stimuli-responsive polymers for use in gene and drug delivery


Thomas Zawodzinski, Ph.D.
(SUNY, Buffalo)

F. Alex Nason Professor of Engineering
Fuel cells, transport and electrochemistry in energy conversion and storage devices, NMR spectroscopy and imaging, transport/structure property relationships in polymer electrolytes, and self-assembly chemistry


Adjunct Faculty


Patrick Mather, Ph.D.
(University of California, Santa Barbara)

Adjunct Professor
Synthesis, processing, and characterization of biomedically relevant polymers, nanocomposites, new functional polymers, mechanisms, and devices based on shape-memory effect, liquid crystalline materials for structural and optical applications, synthesis, processing, and characterization of polymers for PEM fuel cells, and high-performance thermosets


Scott E. Rickert, Ph.D.
(Case Western Reserve University)

Adjunct Professor
Conducting polymers; microdevices; polymer electrodes; polymer adsorption


Angel Romo-Uribe, Ph.D.
(University of Cambridge, UK)

Adjunct Faculty
Physical characterization and fundamental and applied research of soft condensed matter


Alan Riga, Ph.D.
(Case Western Reserve University)

Adjunct Faculty
Extensive industrial and forensic science experience in laboratory testing and characterization of materials, pharmaceuticals, excipients, proteins, metals, alloys, polymers, biopolymers, elastomers, organic chemicals, monomers, resins, thermosets, and thermoplastics


Undergraduate Program


In 1970, the department introduced a program leading to the Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree with a major in polymer science, which is designed to prepare the student both for employment in polymer-based industry and for graduate education in polymer science. The Bachelor of Science program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission (EAC) of ABET, Inc., 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012 – telephone: 410-347-7700.


The Case School of Engineering is proud that this was the first such undergraduate program in the country to receive accreditation from the Engineering Council for Professional Development. The curriculum combines courses dealing with all aspects of polymer science and engineering with basic courses in chemistry, physics, mathematics, and biology, depending on the needs and interests of the student. The student chooses a sequence of technical electives, in consultation with a faculty advisor, allowing a degree of specialization in one particular area of interest, e.g., biomaterials, chemical engineering, biochemistry, or physics. In addition to required formal laboratory courses, students are encouraged to participate in the research activities of the department, both through part-time employment as student laboratory technicians and through the senior project requirement-a one-or two-semester project that involves the planning and performance of a research project.


Polymer science undergraduates are also strongly encouraged to seek summer employment in industrial laboratories during at least one of their three years with the department. In addition to the general undergraduate curriculum in macromolecular science, the department offers three specialized programs which lead to the B.S. with a macromolecular science major. The cooperative program contains all the course work required for full-time resident students plus one or two six-month cooperative sessions in polymer-based industry. The company is selected by the student in consultation with his or her advisor, depending on the available opportunities. The dual-degree program allows students to work simultaneously on two baccalaureate level degrees within the university. It generally takes five years to complete the course requirements for each department for the degree. The B.S./M.S. program leads to the simultaneous completion of requirements for both the master’s and bachelor’s degrees. Students with a minimum G.P.A. of 3.0 may apply for admission to this program in their junior year.


Mission Statement


To educate students who will excel and lead in the development of polymeric materials and the application of structure-property relationships. The department seeks to prepare students for either professional employment or advanced education, primarily in this or related science or engineering disciplines, but also in professional schools of business, law or medicine. Undergraduate students are offered opportunities for significant research experience, capitalizing on the strength of our graduate program.


Specifically, the undergraduate program provides the following educational objectives:


Program Educational Objectives


Our program will produce graduates who: 

  1. Are competent, creative, and highly valued professionals in industry, academia, or government.
  2. Are flexible and adaptable in the workplace, possess the capacity to embrace new opportunities of emerging technologies, and embrace leadership and teamwork opportunities, all affording sustainable engineering careers.
  3. Continue their professional development by obtaining advanced degrees in Polymer Science and Engineering or other professional fields, as well as medicine, law, management, finance or public policy.
  4. Act with global, ethical, societal, ecological, and commercial awareness expected of practicing engineering professionals.

Program Outcomes


Graduates receiving the Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering (major field: Polymer Science and Engineering) at Case Western Reserve University are expected to have attained:
(a) an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering;
(b) an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data;
(c) an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs;
(d) an ability to function in multi-disciplinary teams;
(e) an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems;
(f) an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility;
(g) an ability to communicate effectively;
(h) the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a
      global and societal context;
(i) a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning;
(j) a knowledge of contemporary issues; and
(k) an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.


Graduate Program


Courses leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in macromolecular science are offered within the Case School of Engineering. They are designed to increase the student’s knowledge of macromolecular science and of his own basic area of scientific interest, with application to specific polymer research problems. Research programs derive particular benefit from close cooperation with graduate programs in chemistry, physics, materials science, chemical engineering, biological sciences, and other engineering areas. The interdisciplinary academic structure allows the faculty to fit the individual program to the student’s background and career plans. Basic and advanced courses are offered in polymer synthesis, physical chemistry, physics, biopolymers, and applied polymer science and engineering. A laboratory course in polymer characterization instructs students in the use of modern experimental techniques and equipment. Graduate students are also encouraged to take advanced course work in polymer solid state physics, physical chemistry, synthesis, rheology, and polymer processing. The department also offers, in conjunction with the School of Medicine, a six- to seven-year M.D./Ph.D. program for students interested in the application of polymers and plastics to medicine, as well as for students interested in a molecular structural basis of medicine, particularly related to connective tissues, biomechanics, aging, pharmaceuticals, and blood behavior. Initiated in 1977, it is the only program of its kind in the nation.


Facilities


The Kent Hale Smith Science and Engineering Building houses the Department of Macromolecular Science. The building was built in 1993, and specifically designed to meet the specific needs of polymer research. The facility consists of five floors, plus a basement. The laboratories for chemical synthesis are located principally on the top floor, the molecular and materials characterization laboratories on the middle floors, and the major engineering equipment on the ground floor, while the NMR instrumentation is located in the basement. Electronic classrooms are installed on the ground floor. Instrumentation available includes Small and Wide-Angle X-ray diffractometers; scanning electron microscopy; a complete range of molecular spectroscopic equipment including FTIR, laser Raman, and high resolution solution and solid-state NMR (including imaging), as well as Raman and FTIR microscopes; and dynamic light scattering spectroscopy. There are also facilities for polymer characterization (molecular weight distribution), optical microscopy, solution and bulk rheology, scanning calorimetry, and for testing and evaluating the mechanical properties of materials. The C. Richard Newpher polymer processing laboratory includes a high temperature Rheometrics RMS-800 dynamic mechanical spectrometer, a Bomem DA-3 FTIR with FT-Raman capabilities, a compression molding machine, a Brabender plasticorder, a high speed Instron testing machine, and a vibrating sample magnetometer. The Charles E. Reed ’34 Laboratory is concerned with the mechanical analysis of polymeric materials. The major testing is done by Instron Universal testing instruments including an Instron model 1123 with numerous accessories such as an environmental chamber for high or low temperature experiments. There is also a Bruckner KARO IV biaxial stretching unit, which allows controlled biaxial stretching of polymer films. The laboratory also has an Atomic Force Microscope which probes the morphological and mechanical properties of materials at the nanoscale. The EPIC Molecular Modeling Center contains high-end and low-end Silicon Graphics Computers and various software packages for molecular modeling of polymers.


Research


The research activities of the department span the entire scope of macromolecular science and polymer technology.


Synthesis


New types of macromolecules are being made in the department’s synthesis laboratories. The emphasis is on creating polymers with novel functional properties such as photoconductivity, selective permeation, and biocompatibility.


Physical Characterization


This is the broad area of polymer analysis, which seeks to relate the structure of the polymer at the molecular level to the bulk properties that determine its actual or potential applications. This includes characterization of polymers by infrared, Raman, and NMR spectroscopy, thermal and rheological analysis, determination of structure and morphology by x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy, and investigation of molecular weights and conformation by light scattering.


Mechanical Behavior and Analysis


Polymeric materials are known for their unusual mechanical capabilities, usually exploited as components of structural systems. Analysis includes the study of viscoelastic behavior, yielding and fracture phenomena and a variety of novel irreversible deformation processes.


Processing


A major concern of industry is the efficient and large scale production of polymer materials for commercial applications. Research in this area is focusing on reactive processing, multi-layer processing and polymer mixing, i.e., compounding and blends.


Materials Development and Design


Often, newly conceived products require the development of polymeric materials with certain specific properties or design characteristics. Materials can be tailor-made by designing synthesis and processing conditions to yield the best performance under specified conditions. Examples might be the design of photoluminescent and semi-conducting polymers for use in optoelectronic devices, polymers that are stable at high temperatures for fire-retardant construction materials, high temperature polymer electrolytes for use in advanced fuel cells, low density thermal insulating polymer composite materials and biocompatible polymers for use in prosthetic implants and drug-delivery vehicles.


Biopolymers


Living systems are composed primarily of macromolecules, and research is in progress on several projects of medical relevance. The department has a long-standing interest in the hierarchical structure and properties of the components of connective tissues (e.g., skin, cartilage, and bone). The department is also engaged in the development of new biocompatible polymers for application as biomaterials.


Macromolecular Science and Engineering Course Descriptions (EMAC)

EMAC C100. Co-op Seminar I for Macromolecular Science and Engineering (1)
Professional development activities for students returning from cooperative education assignments. Recommended preparation: COOP 001.


EMAC C200. Co-op Seminar II for Macromolecular Science and Engineering (2)
Professional development activities for students returning from cooperative education assignments. Recommended preparation: COOP 002 and EMAC C100.


EMAC 125. Freshman Research on Polymers (1)
Freshman research in polymer chemistry, engineering, and physics. Students will be placed in active research groups and will participate in real research projects under the supervision of graduate students and faculty mentors.


EMAC 270. Introduction to Polymer Science and Engineering (3)
Science and engineering of large molecules. Correlation of molecular structure and properties of polymers in solution and in bulk. Control of significant structural variables in polymer synthesis. Analysis of physical methods for characterization of molecular weight, morphology, rheology, and mechanical behavior. Recommended preparation: ENGR 145.


EMAC 276. Polymer Properties and Design (3)
The course reviews chemical and physical structures of a wide range of applications for synthetic and natural polymers, and addresses “Which polymer do we choose for a specific application and why?” We examine the polymer properties, the way that these depend on the chemical and physical structures, and reviews how they are processed. We aim to understand the advantages and disadvantages of the different chemical options and why the actual polymers that are used commercially are the best available in terms of properties, processibility and cost. The course is taught in seminar format. The requirements include two written assignments and one oral presentation. Recommended preparation: ENGR 145. SAGES Dept Seminar


EMAC 303. Structure of Biological Materials (3)
Structure of proteins, nucleic acids, connective tissue and bone from molecular to microscopic levels. Principles and applications of instruments for imaging, identification, and measurement of biological materials. Recommended preparation: EBME 202. Offered as EBME 303 and EMAC 303.


EMAC 325. Undergraduate Research in Polymer Science (1 - 3)
Undergraduate laboratory research in polymer chemistry/physics/engineering. Students will undertake an independent research project, working under the mentoring of both a graduate student and a faculty member. A mid-term written progress report is required. A written report and oral presentation will be made at the end of the semester. Can be taken for 1-3 credits per semester, up to a total of 6 credit hours. Students are expected to spend approximately 5 hours/week in the laboratory per credit registered each semester. Recommended preparation: Sophomore/Junior standing and consent of instructor.


EMAC 351. Physical Chemistry for Engineering (3)
Principles of physical chemistry and their application to systems involving physical and chemical transformations. The nature of physical chemistry, properties of gases, overview of the laws of thermodynamics, thermochemistry, solutions, phases and chemical equilibrium, kinetics of chemical reaction, solutions of electrolytes and introduction to quantum mechanics, atomic structure and molecular statistics. Recommended preparation: ENGR 225, PHYS 122.


EMAC 355. Polymer Analysis Laboratory (3)
Experimental techniques in polymer synthesis and characterization. Synthesis by a variety of polymerization mechanisms. Quantitative investigation of polymer structure by spectroscopy, diffraction and microscopy. Molecular weight determination. Physical properties. Recommended preparation: EMAC 270 or MATH 224 or MATH 234.


EMAC 370. Polymer Chemistry and Industry (3)
The nature of polymer chemistry ranging from the fundamentals of organic chemistry of polymer synthesis to the industrial chemistry of polymer production. Physical chemistry as it pertains to the characterization of polymers will also be discussed. Recommended preparation: EMAC 270, CHEM 223, CHEM 224.


EMAC 372. Polymer Processing and Testing Laboratory (3)
Basic techniques for the rheological characterization of thermoplastic and thermoset resins; “hands-on” experience with the equipment used in polymer processing methods such as extrusion, injection molding, compression molding; techniques for mechanical characterization and basic principles of statistical quality control. Recommended preparation: EMAC 377.


EMAC 375. Introduction to Rheology (3)
This course will involve study of rheology from several perspectives; rheological property measurements, phenomenological and molecular models, and applicability to polymer processing. Students will be introduced to experimental methods of rheology with quantitative descriptions of associated flows and data analyses. Application of models, both phenomenological and molecular, to prediction of rheological behavior and extraction of model parameters from real data sets will be examined. The relevance of rheological behavior of different systems to practical processing schemes will be discussed, particularly with respect to plastics manufacturing. Recommended preparation: ENGR 225. Offered as EMAC 375 and EMAC 475.


EMAC 376. Polymer Engineering (3)
Mechanical properties of polymer materials as related to polymer structure and composition. Visco-elastic behavior, yielding and fracture behavior including irreversible deformation processes. Recommended preparation: EMAC 276 and ENGR 200. Offered as EMAC 376 and EMAC 476.


EMAC 377. Polymer Processing (3)
Application of the principles of fluid mechanics, heat transfer and mass transfer to problems in polymer processing; elementary steps in polymer processing (handling of particulate solids, melting, pressurization and pumping, mixing); principles and procedures for extrusion, injection molding, reaction injection molding, secondary shaping. Recommended preparation: ENGR 225.


EMAC 378. Polymer Engineer Design Product (3)
Uses material taught in previous and concurrent courses in an integrated fashion to solve polymer product design problems. Practicality, external requirements, economics, thermal/mechanical properties, processing and fabrication issues, decision making with uncertainty, and proposal and report preparation are all stressed. Several small exercises and one comprehensive process design project will be carried out by class members. Offered as EMAC 378 and EMAC 478. SAGES Senior Cap


EMAC 396. Special Topics (1 - 18)
(Credit as arranged.)


EMAC 397. Special Topics (1 - 18)
(Credit as arranged.)


EMAC 398. Polymer Science and Engineering Project I (1 - 3)
(Senior project). Research under the guidance of faculty. Requirements include periodic reporting of progress, plus a final oral presentation and written report. Repeatable up to 3 credit hours. When taken for 3 credits it may be spread over two successive semesters. Recommended preparation: Senior standing. SAGES Senior Cap


EMAC 399. Polymer Science and Engineering Project II (1 - 9)
(Senior project.) Research under the guidance of staff, culminating in thesis. Recommended preparation: Majors only and senior standing.


EMAC 400T. Graduate Teaching I (0)
This course will engage the Ph.D. students in teaching experiences that will include non-contact (such as preparation and grading of homeworks and tests) and direct contact (leading recitations and monitoring laboratory works, lectures and office hours) activities. The teaching experience will be conducted under the supervision of the faculty. All Ph.D. students will be expected to perform direct contact teaching during the course sequence. The proposed teaching experiences for EMAC Ph.D. students are outlined below in association with undergraduate classes. The individual assignments will depend on the specialization of the students. The activities include grading, recitation, lab supervision and guest lecturing. Recommended preparation: Ph.D. student in Macromolecular Science.


EMAC 401. Polymer Foundation Course I: Organic Chemistry (3)
The class is an introduction to the synthesis and organic chemistry of macromolecules. The course introduces the most important polymerization reactions, focusing on their reaction mechanisms and kinetic aspects. Topics include free radical and ionic chain polymerization, condensation (step-growth) polymerization, ring-opening, insertion and controlled addition polymerization. The lecture portion of this course (2 credit hours) is integrated with a laboratory or term paper component (1 credit hour). There is no limit on the number of students for the class as a whole. However, there is a limit of 12 students on the laboratory component (other students will do term papers).


EMAC 402. Polymer Foundation Course II: Physical Chemistry (3)
This class is an introduction to the physical chemistry of polymers in solution. Topics include: polymer statistics: (microstructure, chain configuration, and chain dimensions), thermodynamics and transport properties of polymers in solution, methods for molecular weight determination, physical chemistry of water-soluble polymers, and characterization of polymer microstructure (IR and NMR). The lecture portion of this course (2 credit hours) is integrated with a laboratory or term paper component (1 credit hour). There is no limit on the number of students for the class as a whole. However, there is a limit of 12 students on the laboratory component (other students will do term papers).


EMAC 403. Polymer Foundation Course III: Physics (3)
This class is an introduction to the physics of polymers in the bulk amorphous and crystalline states. Topics include: structural and morphological analysis using X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, characterization of thermal transitions, viscoelastic behavior and rubber elasticity, and dynamic mechanical analysis. The lecture portion of this course (2 credit hours) is integrated with a laboratory or term paper component (1 credit hour). There is no limit on the number of students for the class as a whole. However, there is a limit of 12 students on the laboratory component (other students will do term papers).


EMAC 404. Polymer Foundation Course IV: Engineering (3)
This class is an introduction to the engineering and technology of polymeric materials. Topics include: additives, blends and composites, natural polymers and fivers, thermoplastics, elastomers, and thermosets, polymer degradation and stability, polymers in the environment, polymer rheology and polymer processing, and polymers for advanced technologies (membrane science, biomedical engineering, applications in electronics, photonic polymers). The lecture portion of this course (2 credit hours) is integrated with a laboratory or term paper component (1 credit hour). There is no limit on the number of students for the class as a whole. However, there is a limit of 12 students on the laboratory component (other students will do term papers).


EMAC 410. Polymers Plus Self - Assembly and Nanomaterials (2)
The course focuses on the concepts of supramolecular chemistry and self-assembly specifically as it applies to nano-polymeric systems. After dealing with many of the fundamental aspects of supramolecular chemistry the focus of the class deals with how to access/utilize nano-scale features using such processes, namely the ‘bottom-up’ approach to nanomaterials/systems. Areas which will be addressed include block copolymers, DNA assemblies, nanotubes and dendrimers. Prereq: EMAC 401 or EMAC 370.


EMAC 412. Polymers Plus Inorganic/Coordination Chemistry (2)
The course focuses on the concepts of inorganic and coordination chemistry specifically as they apply to polymeric systems. The fundamental aspects of coordination chemistry, including coordinative saturation, kinetics and mechanism will be presented and used as a vehicle to descript coordination polymerizations and supramolecular coordination phenomena. The chemistry and physics of nanoscale inorganic modification of polymers by clays, silsesquioxianes, metal oxides and metalparticles will also be discussed. Prereq: EMAC 401 or EMAC 370 or EMAC 470.


EMAC 420. Polymers Plus Advanced Physical Chemistry (2)
The course focuses on the principles of physical chemistry that are most relevant to macromolecular science. Prereq: EMAC 402, EMAC 403.


EMAC 421. Polymer Plus Hierarchical Structures and Properties (2)
Discuss the hierarchical solid state structure of synthetic and naturally occurring polymeric systems and relate these structures to their properties. Particular emphasis will be on natural systems containing collagen(s) and carbohydrate(s), and on synthetic crystalline, liquid crystalline, and reinforced composite polymeric materials. In order to prepare students for application of these concepts we will determine how mechanical, transport and optical (photonic) behavior can be controlled by structure manipulation. Prereq: EMAC 403 and EMAC 404 or EMAC 474 or EMAC 476.


EMAC 422. Polymers Plus X-ray and Microscopy (2)
This course focuses on the theory and application of X-ray and microscopy techniques to the analysis of the microstructure of polymeric materials. The X-ray section covers theoretical and experimental aspects for semicrystalline and amorphous polymers and includes small-angle scattering and neutron & electron diffraction. Techniques, such as atomic force microscopy, transmission and scanning electron microscopy, and optical microscopy, will also be discussed. Practical aspects of these techniques will be applied to a variety of systems, including block copolymers, nanocomposites, LC polymers, and multi-layered films. Prereq: EMAC 403 or EMAC 474.


EMAC 423. Polymers Plus Adhesives, Sealants and Coatings (2)
An introduction to the technology of adhesives, sealants and coatings. Relevant adhesion theories and practices. Resin Structure and Reactivity. Principles of film formation and rheology control. Pigment Dispersion and Color Measurement. Test methods for mechanical properties and durability. Materials technology to comply with environmental regulations. Prereq: EMAC 402 or EMAC 370.


EMAC 444. Polymers Plus Optoelectronics (2)
The course focuses on the design, synthesis and structure-property relationship of polymers with unusual optic and electronic properties and the application of these advanced materials in emerging technologies. Topics include (1) introduction to the interaction of polymers with electromagnetic radiation, (2) Conjugated Polymers: Chemistry & Physics, (3) Intrinsically Conducting Polymers, (4) Ionically Conducting Polymers, (5) Light Emitting Polymers, (6) Polymer Field Effect Transistors and other Semiconductor Devices, (7) Optoelectronic Polymers in Sensors, (8) Nonlinear Optical Polymers, and (9) Latest Developments. Prereq: EMAC 401 or EMAC 370.


EMAC 450. The Business of Polymers (2)
This course will link polymer technology to business and management issues that need to be considered for successful technology commercialization. Topics include project management, finance, opportunity assessment, the voice of the customer, and protection of intellectual property. Case studies from both large and small companies will be used to illustrate key concepts. Recommended preparation: EMAC 270, EMAC 276.


EMAC 451. Polymer Product Design (2)
This course introduces the fundamentals of successful product design and development with specific attention to products based on polymeric materials. Topics covered include the voice of the customer, idea generation and screening, concept selection, prototyping, manufacturing, marketing, and launch. The importance of good design beyond simple form and function will be stressed. Each student will complete a product design portfolio that considers all of these issues. Recommended preparation: EMAC 270, EMAC 276, EMAC 450.


EMAC 471. Polymers in Medicine (3)
This course covers the important fundamentals and applications of polymers in medicine, and consists of three major components: (i) the blood and soft-tissue reactions to polymer implants; (ii) the structure, characterization and modification of biomedical polymers; and (iii) the application of polymers in a broad range of cardiovascular and extravascular devices. The chemical and physical characteristics of biomedical polymers and the properties required to meet the needs of the intended biological function will be presented. Clinical evaluation, including recent advances and current problems associated with different polymer implants. Recommended preparation: EBME 306 or equivalent. Offered as EBME 406 or EMAC 471.


EMAC 475. Introduction to Rheology (3)
This course will involve study of rheology from several perspectives; rheological property measurements, phenomenological and molecular models, and applicability to polymer processing. Students will be introduced to experimental methods of rheology with quantitative descriptions of associated flows and data analyses. Application of models, both phenomenological and molecular, to prediction of rheological behavior and extraction of model parameters from real data sets will be examined. The relevance of rheological behavior of different systems to practical processing schemes will be discussed, particularly with respect to plastics manufacturing. Recommended preparation: ENGR 225. Offered as EMAC 375 and EMAC 475.


EMAC 477. Elementary Steps in Polymer Processing (2)
This course is an application of principles of fluid mechanics and heat transfer to problems in polymer processing. In the first part of the course, basic principles of transport phenomena will be reviewed. In the second part, the elementary steps in polymer processing will be described and analyzed with application to a single screw extruder.


EMAC 478. Polymer Engineer Design Product (3)
Uses material taught in previous and concurrent courses in an integrated fashion to solve polymer product design problems. Practicality, external requirements, economics, thermal/mechanical properties, processing and fabrication issues, decision making with uncertainty, and proposal and report preparation are all stressed. Several small exercises and one comprehensive process design project will be carried out by class members. Offered as EMAC 378 and EMAC 478.


EMAC 490. Polymers Plus Professional Development (1)
This course focuses on graduate student professional development. The course involves weekly meetings and oral presentations with attention on the content and style of the presentation materials (PowerPoint, posters, etc.), oral presentation style and project management skills. This course can be taken for the total of 3 credits over three different semesters.


EMAC 491. Polymers Plus Literature Review (1)
This course involves weekly presentations of the current polymer literature. It involves at least one presentation by the enrolled student and participation in all literature reviews (at least 10/semester). The course will focus on presentation skills (both oral and written), scientific interpretation, and development of peer-review skills. This course can be taken for a total of 3 credits over three different semesters.


EMAC 500T. Graduate Teaching II (0)
This course will engage the Ph.D. students in teaching experiences that will include non-contact (such as preparation and grading of homework and tests) and direct contact (leading recitations and monitoring laboratory works, lectures and office hours) activities. The teaching experience will be conducted under the supervision of the faculty. All Ph.D. students will be expected to perform direct contact teaching during the course sequence. The proposed teaching experiences for EMAC Ph.D. students are outlined below in association with graduate classes. The individual assignments will depend on the specialization of the students. The activities include grading, recitation, lab supervision and guest lecturing. Recommended preparation: Ph.D. student in Macromolecular Science.


EMAC 600T. Graduate Teaching III (0)
This course will engage the Ph.D. students in teaching experiences that will include non-contact and direct contact activities. The teaching experience will be conducted under the supervision of the faculty. The proposed teaching experiences for EMAC Ph.D. student in this course involve instruction in the operation of major instrumentation and equipment used in the daily research activities. The individual assignments will depend on the specialization of the students. Recommended preparation: Ph.D. student in Macromolecular Science.


EMAC 601. Independent Study (1 - 18)
(Credit as arranged.)


EMAC 651. Thesis M.S. (1 - 18)
(Credit as arranged.)


EMAC 673. Selected Topics in Polymer Engineering (2 - 3)
Timely issues in polymer engineering are presented at the advanced graduate level. Content varies, but may include: mechanisms of irreversible deformation: failure, fatigue and fracture of polymers and their composites; processing structure-property relationships; and hierarchical design of polymeric systems. Recommended preparation: EMAC 376 or EMAC 476.


EMAC 677. Colloquium in Macromolecular Science and Engineering (0 - 1)
Lectures by invited speakers on subjects of current interest in polymer science and engineering. This course can be taken for 3 credits over three different semesters.


EMAC 690. Special Topics in Macromolecular Science (1 - 18)


EMAC 701. Dissertation Ph.D. (1 - 18)
(Credit as arranged.) Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.


Bachelor of Science in Engineering Degree
Major in Polymer Science and Engineering (standard track)


First Year Class-Lab-Credit Hours
Fall
Humanities/Social Science (3-0-3)
CHEM 111 Principles of Chemistry for Engineers a (4-0-4)
ENGR 131 Elementary Computer Programming a (2-2-3)
MATH 121 Calculus for Science and Engineering a (4-0-4)
FSCC 100 Sages First Seminar a (4-0-4)
PHED 101 Physical Education Activities (0-3-0)
Total (17-5-18)


Spring
SAGES University Seminar I b (3-0-3)
ENGR 145 Chemistry of Materials a (4-0-4)
MATH 122 Calculus for Science and Engineering II a (4-0-4)
PHYS 121 General Physics I a (4-0-4)
EMAC 125 Freshman Research on Polymers (1-0-1)
PHED 102 Physical Education Activities (0-3-0)
Total (16-3-16)


Second Year
Fall
SAGES University Seminar II b (3-0-3)
CHEM 223 Organic Chemistry I (3-0-3)
EMAC 270 Introduction to Polymer Science and Engineering a (3-0-3)
MATH 223 Calculus for Science and Engineering III a (3-0-3)
PHYS 122 General Physics II a (4-0-4)
Total (16-0-16)


Spring
Humanities or Social Science (3-0-3)
CHEM 224 Organic Chemistry II (3-0-3)
EMAC 276 Polymer Properties and Design
(SAGES Departmental Seminar) (3-0-3)
MATH 224 Elementary Differential Equations (3-0-3)
or
MATH 234 Introduction to Dynamic Systems a (3-0-3)
ENGR 225 Thermodynamics, Fluid Mechanics, and Heat and Mass Transfer (4-0-4)
Total (16-0-16)


Third Year Class-Lab-Credit Hours
Fall
Humanities or Social Sciences (3-0-3)
Natural Science elective c (3-0-3)
CHEM 290 Chemistry Laboratory Methods for Engineers (1-5-3)
or CHEM 321 (1-5-3)
EMAC 351 Physical Chemistry for Engineers I (3-0-3)
ENGR 200 Statics and Strength of Materials a (3-0-3)
Technical elective I d,e (2-0-2)
Total (15-5-17)


Spring
Humanities or Social Sciences (3-0-3)
EMAC 355 Polymer Analysis Laboratory (2-4-3)
EMAC 376 Polymer Engineering (3-0-3)
ENGL 398N Professional Communication (3-0-3)
Technical elective II e (3-0-3)
Total (14-4-15)


Fourth Year
Fall
ENGR 210 Introduction to Circuits & Instrumentation a (4-0-4)
EMAC 370 Polymer Chemistry and Industry (3-0-3)
EMAC 377 Polymer Processing (3-0-3)
EMAC 398 Polymer Science & Engineering Project (SAGES Capstone Course) a,f (0-9-3)
Technical elective III e (3-0-3)
Total (13-9-16)


Spring
Open elective (3-0-3)
EMAC 372 Polymer Processing Laboratory (2-4-3)
EMAC 378 Polymer Production and Technology (3-0-3)
Technical elective III e (3-0-3)
Technical elective IV e (3-0-3)
Total (14-4-15)


Hours required for graduation: 129

  1. Engineering Core Courses.
  2. Choice of USNA, USSO, or USSY course focused on thinking about the natural, social, or symbolic “world.”
  3. Approved Natural Science electives: PHYS 221 or 223, General Physics III; BIOL 210, Molecular Cell Biology; BIOL 205, Chemical Biology; STAT 312, Basic Statistics for Eng. & Soc.; PHYS 349, Methods of Mathematical Physics; BIOC 307, General Biochemistry.
  4. EMAC 325 may be taken as a technical elective.
  5. Technical sequence must be approved by department advisor.
  6. Preparation for the polymer science project should commence in the previous semester.


Bachelor of Science in Engineering Degree
Major in Polymer Science and Engineering (biomaterials track)


First Year Class-Lab-Credit Hours
Fall
Humanities or Social Sciences a (3-0-3)
CHEM 111 Principles of Chemistry for Engineers a (4-0-4)
ENGR 131 Elementary Computer Programming a (2-2-3)
MATH 121 Calculus for Science and Engineering a (4-0-4)
FSCC 100 Sages First Seminar a (4-0-4)
PHED 101 Physical Education Activities (0-3-0)
Total (17-5-18)


Spring
SAGES University Seminar I b (3-0-3)
ENGR 145 Chemistry of Materials a (4-0-4)
MATH 122 Calculus for Science and Engineering II a (4-0-4)
PHYS 121 General Physics I a (4-0-4)
PHED 102 Physical Education Activities (0-3-0)
Total (15-3-15)


Second Year
Fall
SAGES University Seminar II b (3-0-3)
EBME 201 Physiology - Biophysics I (3-0-3)
EMAC 270 Introduction to Polymer Science and Engineering a (3-0-3)
MATH 223 Calculus for Science and Engineering III a (3-0-3)
PHYS 122 General Physics II a (4-0-4)
Total (16-0-16)


Spring
Humanities or Social Sciences II a (3-0-3)
EBME 202 Physiology - Biophysics II d (3-0-3)
EMAC 276 Polymer Properties and Design (SAGES Departmental Seminar) (3-0-3)
MATH 224 Elementary Differential Equations (3-0-3)
or
MATH 234 Introduction to Dynamic Systems a (3-0-3)
ENGR 225 Thermodynamics, Fluid Mechanics, and Heat and Mass Transfer a (4-0-4)
Total (16-0-16)


Third Year Class-Lab-Credit Hours
Fall
Humanities or Social Sciences a (3-0-3)
CHEM 223 Organic Chemistry I d (3-0-3)
CHEM 290 Chemistry Laboratory Methods for Engineers (1-5-3)
or CHEM 321 (1-5-3)
EBME 306 Introduction to Biomedical Materials (3-0-3)
EMAC 351 Physical Chemistry for Engineers I (3-0-3)
ENGR 200 Statics and Strength of Materials a (3-0-3)
Total (16-5-18)


Spring
Natural Science elective c (3-0-3)
CHEM 224 Organic Chemistry II d (3-0-3)
EMAC 376 Polymer Engineering (3-0-3)
EMAC 303 Structure of Biological Materials (3-0-3)
EMAC 351 Polymer Analysis Laboratory or Technical elective I e,f (3-0-3)
Total (15-0-15)


Fourth Year
Fall
Humanities or Social Sciences a (3-0-3)
ENGR 210 Introduction to Circuits & Instrumentation a (4-0-4)
EMAC 370 Polymer Chemistry and Industry (3-0-3)
EMAC 377 Polymer Processing (3-0-3)
Technical elective I or EMAC 372 Polymer Processing Laboratory e, f(3-0-3)
Total (16-0-16)


Spring
EMAC 378 Polymer Production and Technology (3-0-3)
EMAC 398 Polymer Science & Engineering Project (SAGES Capstone Course) a,g (3-0-3)
ENGL 398N Professional Communication a (3-0-3)
Technical elective II f (3-0-3)
Technical elective III f (3-0-3)
Total (15-0-15)


Hours required for graduation: 129

  1. Engineering Core Courses.
  2. Choice of USNA, USSO, or USSY course focused on thinking about the natural, social, or symbolic “world.”
  3. Approved Natural Science electives: BIOL 214, Genes and Evolution (d); BIOL 215, Cells and Proteins (d); BIOC 307, General Biochemistry (d); BIOL 362, Developmental Biology.
  4. Suggested for pre-med students.
  5. Students are required to take either EMAC 355 or EMAC 372.
  6. The three technical electives have to be taken from: EBME 315, Applied Tissue Engineering; EBME 316, Introduction to Drug Delivery; EBME 325, Introduction to Tissue Engineering; EBME 350, Quantitative Molecular Bioengineering; EBME 405, Materials for Prosthetics and Orthotics, EBME 408, Tissue and Cell Engineering; EBME 426, Gene and Drug Delivery; EMAC 471 / EBME 406, Polymers in Medicine; a three-credit research sequence of EMAC 125 and/or EMAC 325.
  7. Preparation for the polymer science project should commence in the previous semester.