School of Medicine

 

Room BRB 113, School of Medicine
10900 Euclid Ave.
Cleveland, Ohio 44106-4915
Pamela B. Davis, M.D., Ph.D.,Dean
Phone 216-368-2825
Fax 216-368-2820
http://casemed.case.edu

 

The mission of the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine is to advance the health of humankind through four interrelated components:

  1. Education: To provide the highest-quality humanistic and scientific education for students pursuing the doctor of medicine degree, advanced degrees in the biomedical sciences, and graduate and continuing medical education.
  2. Research: To lead in the development of new knowledge in the biomedical sciences, the clinical disciplines, and areas of inquiry that examine the organization and provision of health care services.
  3. Clinical care: To deliver excellent clinical care through faculty members and bring leading-edge treatments from the laboratory to practice.
  4. Public service: To contribute to the public good -- locally, nationally and globally -- in activities related to health and health care.

Since its founding in 1843, the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine has been an innovator in medical education and a leader in pioneering research.


The school was one of the first medical schools in the country to employ instructors devoted to full-time teaching and research. Six of the first seven women to receive medical degrees from accredited American medical schools graduated from Western Reserve College (as it was called then) between 1850 and 1856.


Already a leading educational institution for more than a century, in 1952 the School of Medicine initiated the most advanced medical curriculum in the country, pioneering integrated education, a focus on organ systems and team teaching in the preclinical curriculum. This curriculum instituted a pass/fail grading system for the first two years of medical school to promote cooperation among students instead of competitiveness, introduced students to clinical work and patients almost as soon as they arrived on campus, and provided free, unscheduled time in an era when doing so seemed unthinkable. Many other medical schools followed suit, and these components remain at the core of the medical school’s curriculum today.


At least eleven Nobel Prize holders have ties to the School of Medicine:

Two other distinguished alumni have served as U.S. surgeon general: Jesse Steinfeld, M.D., a 1949 graduate, was surgeon general from 1969 to 1973, and David Satcher, M.D., Ph.D., graduated in 1970 and was surgeon general from 1998 to 2002.


Dr. Satcher also served as director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from 1993 to 1998, and another medical school graduate, Julie Gerberding, M.D., M.P.H., followed in his footsteps, in 2002 becoming the first woman to be named CDC director.


The school is very proud of the contributions made by its educators and graduates but doesn’t rest on its laurels. Today, the Case School of Medicine is among the top medical schools in the enrollment of minority students, and each class contains a high percentage of women. The curriculum responds to the latest findings in education and medicine and sets the pace for other schools.


The Case School of Medicine was the first medical school to provide laptop computers to all its students. Today, students use their laptops to access the entire syllabus as well as numerous electronic resources deemed essential by faculty. Students have access to the WiFi network at the medical school and across campus. The wireless network also brings the latest technological resources to the fingertips of faculty during classroom time and facilitates interactive education through video conferencing among many learning sites. But technology is used to enhance, not replace, the faculty-student interaction that occurs in the classroom, the laboratory and small group discussions.


The School of Medicine is the largest biomedical research institution in Ohio, as measured by funding received from the National Institutes of Health, the world’s largest funding agency of biomedical research. The medical school receives more NIH funding than all the other Ohio medical schools combined and is in the top tier of medical schools nationally.


U.S. News and World Report repeatedly has ranked the Case Western Reserve School of Medicine as one of the top research medical schools in the country.


In 2002, the school became only the third institution in history to receive the best review possible from the body that grants accreditation to U.S. and Canadian medical schools, the Liaison Committee on Medical Education. Also in 2002, the school built on its tradition of innovation in education when the university and the Cleveland Clinic Foundation entered into an agreement to form the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, with the first class matriculating in 2004.


History


Founded in 1843 as the Medical Department of Western Reserve College (and popularly known then as the Cleveland Medical College), the school moved into its first permanent home, in downtown Cleveland, in 1846. In 1915, a 20-acre site was secured for a medical center in University Circle, the current home of Case Western Reserve University, its School of Medicine, and two of the school’s affiliated hospitals, University Hospitals of Cleveland and the Louis Stokes Cleveland Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center. University Circle also is home to many of the country’s outstanding cultural and educational institutions.


In 1924, the School of Medicine moved into the most modern and best-equipped preclinical science building in the country at that time. That building, donated by Cleveland industrialist Samuel Mather, remains an integral part of the medical school complex. It was named the Harland Goff Wood Building in 1993 in honor of the late chair and professor of biochemistry and former provost of the university.


In 1971, the Health Sciences Center was completed to house the university’s medical, dental and nursing schools, as well as the Health Center Library. In 1994, the health sciences complex was named for now-retired U.S. Congressman Louis Stokes. The proximity of these excellent research and educational centers to other prestigious university departments, including science, engineering and social sciences, stimulates uniquely creative interaction among researchers and educators.


Another giant leap in research capabilities came in the early 1990s, when the Richard F. Celeste Biomedical Research Building, named for the former Ohio governor, was opened. The $70 million building, attached to the Wood Building, added 154,000 square feet of research space and includes conference spaces, a lecture hall, public spaces and a cafeteria.


Recent boosts in research capabilities came with the spring 2003 dedication of a new, eight-floor addition to the School of Medicine’s Wood Building, which added more than 40,000 square feet to the medical school, primarily for research laboratories. Also as part of the project, 30,000 square feet of existing laboratory space in the Wood Building was renovated. And in the fall of 2003, the School of Medicine and University Hospitals of Cleveland dedicated the new, eight-floor Iris S. and Bert L. Wolstein Research Building, adding 320,000 square feet of space for up to 700 researchers.


Faculty


The university’s medical school educators have received four Abraham Flexner Awards for Distinguished Service to Medical Education, more than have educators at any other medical school in the country, from the Association of American Medical Colleges.


The School of Medicine has 1,670 full-time and 2,104 part-time faculty members who teach in classroom, laboratory, small group and clinical settings. These faculty members work in the medical school’s fifteen preclinical departments, twenty clinical science disciplines, and numerous centers.


Education


In 2002, the School of Medicine became only the third institution in history to receive the best review possible from the body that grants accreditation to U.S. and Canadian medical degree programs, the Liaison Committee on Medical Education. School of Medicine faculty lead two programs leading to the M.D. at the School of Medicine (the longstanding School of Medicine program, also known as the University Program, and the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine at Case Western Reserve University, also known as the College Program, which is scheduled to open in academic year 2004-2005), and one program resulting in an M.D. through the University Program and a Ph.D. in a basic science discipline through the School of Graduate Studies (the Medical Scientist Training Program or MSTP and the M.D./Ph.D. program offered through the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics). Also, through the School of Graduate Studies, School of Medicine faculty lead programs resulting in Ph.D. and master’s degrees in basic science disciplines. All of these degree programs are detailed in this School of Medicine section of this General Bulletin.


Research


As a research institution, the School of Medicine also has a tradition of national leadership. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is the country’s largest funding source for biomedical research, and the School of Medicine consistently has ranked in the top tier of the nation’s medical schools for federal research funding from the NIH. In fact, fiscal year 2002 (at press time the latest year for which figures were available) marked the 16th consecutive year that NIH funding to the medical school had increased. In fiscal year 2002, the school received more than $239 million in grants from the NIH, including funds to the school’s newest affiliate, the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. The school ranked first among Ohio’s six medical schools, receiving more NIH funding than all the other Ohio schools combined.


Clinical Care


The School of Medicine provides world-class clinical care through full-time faculty at its major affiliates, including the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Louis Stokes Cleveland Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, MetroHealth Medical Center, and University Hospitals of Cleveland. Their positions on faculty ensure the transition of leading-edge treatments from the laboratory to the clinical setting.


Public Service


The School of Medicine also serves the northern Ohio community in many ways. The school’s faculty provide 90 percent of the indigent health care in Cuyahoga County and a majority of the care for indigent patients in Ohio. The School of Medicine’s commitment to the community also is illustrated by a number of programs that link researchers and medical students to the community. These include the Center for Science, Health and Society, the Office of Urban Health, the Center for Adolescent Health, the Center for Health Promotion Research, the Primary Care Track, and the Institute for Public Health Sciences, involving the MetroHealth System and the School of Medicine. This latter program includes research into the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of health problems in groups and communities, as well as educational programs for medical and graduate students, physicians and other health care personnel.


Current community-based programs, including the Urban Area Health Education Center (AHEC) and the award-winning Cleveland Health Education Program, offer opportunities for students from several of the university’s undergraduate and professional schools, especially the medical school, to interact with students in the Cleveland public schools and with the community at large. Also, through the master of public health degree program, students complete a public health field practicum in which they work on a project for a public agency and produce a report for the agency. M.P.H. graduates are qualified to work in local and state health departments, universities and colleges, hospitals, ambulatory medical centers, non-profit organizations, and the insurance and pharmaceutical industries.


A major economic influence on the northern Ohio area, the School of Medicine and its affiliated hospitals are among the largest employers of personnel in the area and further stimulate the economy by providing concepts for technology transfer to the business sector.


On the international level, the School of Medicine has a global health and diseases program focusing on AIDS, parasitic diseases, tuberculosis, malaria and other diseases that directly threaten world health.


Administration


The dean of the School of Medicine, who reports to the president of the university, also is vice president for medical affairs at Case Western Reserve University. The dean is responsible for the administration of the school and for the university’s relationships with affiliated hospitals; medical health-related agencies and institutions; and community health care, education and research programs involving the faculty of the School of Medicine. One of the dean’s newest education-related responsibilities is the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, a program within the School of Medicine that was announced in mid-2002. The dean of the School of Medicine also is the director of the Case Research Institute, a joint, virtual research enterprise of Case Western Reserve and University Hospitals of Cleveland, announced in late 2002, that brings together the strategic planning, operational aspects and financial support of all research initiatives of the clinical and translational departments of the School of Medicine and University Hospitals of Cleveland.


The chairs of university departments are delegated administrative responsibility in their respective areas and report to the dean.


The faculty of the School of Medicine, through the Faculty Council, plan and implement educational programs and formulate general policies and those regarding student affairs.


CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE ADMINISTRATION


Pamela B. Davis, M.D., Ph.D.
Dean, School of Medicine
Vice Dean for Research


Daniel Ornt, M.D.
Vice Dean for Education and Academic Affairs,
Vice Dean for Education for the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University


Lisa Ory Marshall
Senior Associate Dean for Development, Alumni Relations and Communications


C. Kent Smith, M.D.
Senior Associate Dean for Students


Murray D. Altose, M.D.
Associate Dean for Louis Stokes Cleveland Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center


Daniel E. Anker, Ph.D., J.D.
Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs and Human Resources


Ben H. Brouhard, M.D.
Associate Dean for the MetroHealth System


Claire M. Doerschuk, M.D.
Associate Dean for Medical Student Research


Robert L. Haynie, M.D., Ph.D.
Associate Dean for Student Affairs


Lina Mehta, M.D.
Associate Dean for Admissions


Achilles Demetriou, M.D., Ph.D.
Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs


Jerry M. Shuck, M.D., D.Sc.
Associate Dean and Director of Graduate Medical Education


Richard Sohn, Ph.D.
Associate Dean for Research Administration


Thomas R. Sonderegger
Associate Dean for Finance and Budget


Terry M. Wolpaw, M.D.
Associate Dean for Curricular Affairs


Alison K. Hall, Ph.D.
Director of Graduate Education


Andrew J. Fishleder, M.D.
Executive Dean, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University


Alan L. Hull, M.D., Ph.D.
Associate Dean for Curricular Affairs, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University


Andrew C. Novick, M.D.
Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University


Kathleen N. Franco, M.D.
Associate Dean for Admissions and Student Affairs, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University


Jill Stanley
Assistant Dean for Space and Facilities Planning


Edward A. Bruss
Director of Finance and Planning


Virginia G. Saha
Director, Cleveland Health Sciences Library


Rick Whitbeck
Director, Case/University Hospitals Health Systems Continuing Medical Education


Basic Sciences


Anatomy
Joseph LaManna, Ph.D.


Biochemistry
Michael Weiss, M.D., Ph.D.


Bioethics
Stuart Youngner, M.D.


Biomedical Engineering
Patrick Crago, Ph.D.


Environmental Health Sciences
G. David McCoy, Ph.D.


Epidemiology and Biostatistics
Alfred Rimm, Ph.D.


General Medical Sciences
TBN


Cancer Center
Stanton Gerson, M.D.


Center for Bioarchitectonics
Raymond Lasek, Ph.D.


Center for Global Health and Diseases
James Kazura, M.D.


Center for Psychoanalytic Child Development
Thomas Barrett, Ph.D.


Center for RNA Molecular Biology
Timothy Nilsen, Ph.D.


Center for Science, Health and Society
Nathan Berger, M.D.


Genetics
Joseph Nadeau, Ph.D.


Molecular Biology and Microbiology
Jonathan Karn, Ph.D.


Molecular Medicine (Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University)
Paul DiCorleto, Ph.D.


Neurosciences
Lynn Landmesser, Ph.D.


Nutrition
Henri Brunengraber, M.D., Ph.D.


Pathology
John Lowe, M.D.


Pharmacology
Krzysztof Palczewski, Ph.D.


Physiology and Biophysics
Cathy Carlin, Ph.D. (Acting)


Clinical Science Chairs


ANESTHESIOLOGY
Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine
Fawzy Estafanous, M.D.


MetroHealth Medical Center
Tejbir Sidhu, M.D.


ANESTHESIOLOGY AND PERIOPERATIVE MEDICINE
University Hospitals of Cleveland

Howard Nearman, M.D.


DERMATOLOGY
MetroHealth Medical Center

Marlene Willen, M.D. (Acting)

University Hospitals of Cleveland
Kevin Cooper, M.D.


EMERGENCY MEDICINE
MetroHealth Medical Center

Charles Emerman, M.D.

University Hospitals of Cleveland
Edward A. Michelson, M.D.


FAMILY MEDICINE
MetroHealth Medical Center

James Campbell, M.D.
University Hospitals of Cleveland
George Kikano, M.D.


MEDICINE
Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine

James Young, M.D.
MetroHealth Medical Center
Alfred Connors Jr., M.D.
University Hospitals of Cleveland
Richard Walsh, M.D.


NEUROLOGICAL SURGERY
University Hospitals of Cleveland

Warren Selman, M.D.


NEUROLOGY
MetroHealth Medical Center

Joseph Hanna, M.D.
University Hospitals of Cleveland
Robert Daroff, M.D. (interim)


OPHTHALMOLOGY
University Hospitals of Cleveland

Jonathan Lass, M.D.


ORTHOPAEDICS
MetroHealth Medical Center

Brendan Patterson, M.D.
University Hospitals of Cleveland
Randall Marcus, M.D.


OTOLARYNGOLOGY – HEAD AND NECK SURGERY
MetroHealth Medical Center

Joseph Carter, M.D.
University Hospitals of Cleveland
James Arnold, M.D.


PATHOLOGY (CLINICAL)
Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine

William Hart, M.D.
MetroHealth Medical Center
Joseph Tomashefski, M.D.
University Hospitals of Cleveland
John Lowe, M.D.


PEDIATRICS
Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine

Michael Levine, M.D.
MetroHealth Medical Center
Robert Cohn, M.D.
University Hospitals of Cleveland
Avroy Fanaroff, M.D.


PHYSICAL MEDICINE & REHABILITATION
MetroHealth Medical Center

Gary Clark, M.D.


PSYCHIATRY
MetroHealth Medical Center

R. Taylor Segraves, M.D., Ph.D.
University Hospitals of Cleveland
Robert J. Ronis, M.D. (Acting)


RADIATION ONCOLOGY
University Hospitals of Cleveland

Timothy Kinsella, M.D.


RADIOLOGY
Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine

Michael Modic, M.D.
MetroHealth Medical Center
Anthony Minotti, M.D.
University Hospitals of Cleveland
Charles Lanzieri, M.D. (Acting)


REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY
MetroHealth Medical Center

Patrick Catalano, M.D.
University Hospitals of Cleveland
James Liu, M.D.


SURGERY
Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine

Kenneth Ouriel, M.D.
MetroHealth Medical Center
Mark Malagoni, M.D.
University Hospitals of Cleveland
Jeffrey Ponsky, M.D.


UROLOGY
University Hospitals of Cleveland

Martin Resnick. M.D.