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Education Sessions

Session Block 1

Wednesday, July 12 | 8:45 a.m. - 10 a.m.

MANAGING UP: HOW INTERNATIONAL ADMISSIONS CAN STAY RELEVANT FOR YOUR INSTITUTION’S LEADERSHIP 
Tinkham Veale University Center, Ballroom A

Presenters:

  • Ryan Sullivan, New Brunswick CommunityCollege
  • Jim Crawley, Alma College

Have you ever struggled for senior leadership’s support for new or continued overseas initiatives, wished that strategic planning didn't always mean being told you need to do more with less, or needed to have THAT conversation with your boss on the value of international students to campus?As individuals responsible for directing your institution’s efforts to bring in students from overseas, keeping your head down and just doing your job well is not a long-term,survivable plan if you want to thrive. Whether you supervise others or not, we all have bosses at work. Managing your relationship with your supervisor is as important as your actual day-to-day responsibilities. This panel will address ways to establish the framework for what you have planned(your common ground), have those difficult conversations(your expertise) and keep open lines of communication (your well-being).

 

THE MMI REVEALED: HELPING YOUR STUDENTS PREPARE FOR THE MMI IN U.K. APPLICATIONS
DeGrace, Room 312

Presenters:

  • Craig Brown, Shawnigan Lake School
  • Simon Fitch, St. George’s, University ofLondon
  • Richard Evans, RVC, University of London

Following feedback received by counselors around the world and at previous conferences, at this session, students and representatives from U.K. Medical and Veterinary programs will focus on a detailed explanation of the Multiple MiniInterviews (MMI) component of applying to U.K Med and Vet programs. The interactive session will start with students explaining their experiences and how they prepared for the MMI via videos prepared for this session. Reflecting these students’views, we’ll then consider the MMI from the university perspective and will include tips and guidance from a high school guidance counselor around preparation for this crucial, but often less understood, part of the med and vet application process. We will also create some opportunities for participants to experience some of the MMI procedure firsthand. Overall, this session will give counselors a better understanding of the role of the MMI and, most importantly,what students experience during the process.

 

EDUCATING INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS ABOUT THE LANDSCAPE OF SEXUAL ASSAULT
Tinkham Veale University Center, Ballroom C

Presenters:

  • Diana Abukazam, Korea International School Jeju
  • Tresa Virankabutra, Concordian International School

The importance of sex education has never been greater.One in five female college students are survivors of sexual assault. (Washington Post-Kaiser Family FoundationSurvey, 2015; Krebs, Lindquist, Berzofsky, Shooks-Sa &Peterson 2016; Cantor et al., 2015) Eleven percent of rapes on campus are reported, making it the most underreported violent crime (Rand, 2009; Kilpatrick, Resnick, Ruggeirio,Conoscenti & McCauley 2007). This session will review the literature of sexual assault across various U.S. states and countries, the long-term impact on students and how counselors can implement awareness programs at their schools to empower young people to advocate for themselves.

 

PROMOTING CULTURAL DIVERSITY ON YOUR CAMPUSES
Tinkham Veale University Center, Ballroom B

Presenters:

  • Deya’ Leonard Dresner, Leonard Education Organization
  • Charlie Cogan, Carleton College
  • Jason Nevinger, University of Rochester

Understanding the many benefits that a U.S. college experience can offer international students as well as the challenges and long-term ramifications for these students is especially important to those from countries in conflict.Why do so many international youth prefer American institutions for higher education? An examination of this fact can assist admissions officers with their desire to expand this community on their campuses. Leonard EducationOrganization (LE.O) established a unique approach to support underserved Palestinian youth. Their bicultural staff selects,vets and prepares highly qualified Palestinian students for an undergraduate education in the U.S. LE.O provides mentorship, guardianship and soft skills development to the youth and continues working with them throughout their American educational experience and beyond. LE.O executive director Deya’ Leonard Dresner will be joined by panelists from Carleton College and The University ofRochester as well as a Palestinian student studying in the U.S.

 

HIGH-ACHIEVING AND LOW-INCOME IN AFRICA - HURDLES,WHAT HURDLES?
Rockefeller, Room 301

Presenters:

  • Rebecca Zeigler Mano, Education Matters
  • Rebekah Westphal, Yale University
  • James Linville, Abaarso School of Science and Technology
  • Ed Tourle, Pestalozzi International Village Trust
  • Eva Ntalami, The Zawadi Africa Educational Fund

We’ve heard about hidden costs of attending U.S. colleges for low-income students, but what about the hurdles that we sometimes (unknowingly) put in front of students during the admissions process? Join members of the HALI AccessNetwork to discuss gathered research about how students overcome difficulties in the admission process from testing requirements, official documents, credit card payments,“Americanisms” and more. Be prepared for an interactive and fun session of sharing and stories.The HALI Access Network, founded in April 2016, is a group of 27 community-based organizations from all over Africa that support high-achieving/low-income students through the university admission process and beyond. In addition to stated panelists, additional members of the HALI AccessNetwork will be present at the session.

 

BUILDING AN INTERNATIONAL RECRUITMENT & FINANCIAL AID STRATEGY: HOW TWO INSTITUTIONS DID IT, STEP-BYSTEP
Ford Auditorium

Presenters:

  • Adrienne Ramsey, Babson College
  • Jonathan Burdick, University of Rochester
  • Bridget Herrera, American International School

So you know you want to recruit international students and that you value socioeconomic diversity as well. Now what?In which regions do you start? How do you get the word out? And what about financial aid? How much will you need to offer? Who do you need to convince, and from where—internally and externally—might the money come? Join us for a step-by-step review of how the University of Rochester went from 4 percent to 26 percent international students in just six years and how Babson College has developed its new financial aid strategy. Learn what worked, what didn’t and why they are confident that you, too, can expand the international AND financial aid numbers at your institution.

 

FINANCIAL AID OUTSIDE THE U.S.: FINDING FUNDING IN CANADA, EUROPE AND BEYOND
Peter B. Lewis Building, Room 203

Presenters:

  • Sana Itayim, EducationUSA
  • Asuman Okman, The Koc School

We all know that U.S. colleges and universities tend to be the most generous when it comes to international student financial aid. But there are more options out there! Join these experienced high school counselors and university admission representatives to hear about where else in the world your students can find funding for their studies. Learn about financial aid options, requirements and application procedures.

 

INTERNATIONAL ADMISSIONS 101: WHY DO WE DO WHATWE DO?
Mandel Center, Room 115

Presenters:

  • Diva Shrestha, Colby College
  • Misha Garg, Williams College
  • Preeti Samuel Rajendran, UWC Mahindra College

Calling new and seasoned international admissions professionals from both sides of the desk. Hear from three international admissions counselors who have lived the admission cycle from their own countries, experienced the life of an international student in the States and then transitioned to working in international recruitment. We bring to you the unique perspective of the international student experience come a full-cycle, discussing the various struggles and challenges of being on a non-immigrant visa,and how our experiences have guided successful strategies in recruiting and retaining international students at our respective campuses.

 

GERMANY 101 - THE NITTY-GRITTY OF GETTING INTO GERMAN UNIVERSITIES
Linsalata Alumni Center, Ballroom

Presenters:

  • Angolwisye Mwakisu, Jacobs University Bremen
  • Annette Gambach, Karlsruhe Institute ofTechnology - Carl Benz School of Engineering
  • Scott Loeffler, Frankfurt International School

Germany is becoming a popular destination for international students. One of the reasons for this is the solid reputation of German universities, but additional appeal comes from the fact that access to public higher education institutions in Germany is free for both domestic and international students. Applying to German universities can be confusing, often involving challenging terminology like “Hochschulzugangsberechtigung,”“Zeugnisanerkennungsstelle” and “Numerus Clausus,”particularly when it comes to admission requirements for international applicants. This session will include a short introduction to the Abitur, a discussion on the secondary school credentials required for successful admission (with case studies for IB, American high school diploma and U.K.A-level applicants), a look at the application process, as well as the different post-secondary school options your student scan explore. Your questions and comments are encouraged,and we promise we will try to teach you how to pronounce those bombastic words!

 

SHATTERING CEILINGS AND TAKING NAMES: BREAKING THROUGH GENDER BARRIERS IN UNIVERSITY LEADERSHIP
Mandel Center, Room 108

Presenters:

  • Lin Larson, University of California, Berkeley
  • Dane Rowley, California Lutheran University
  • Rebecca Hansen, Northern Kentucky University
  • Terra Good, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
  • April Crabtree, University of San Francisco

his session will investigate the progress of talented individuals fighting discrimination within higher education institutions and professional organizations. Women,transgender individuals and others do not only fight for positions—there is a bias when considering these people for high-level, high-profile positions within higher education.Using data collected from various member organizations, we will share the stories of these populations, consider proactive responses and workshop practical interventions. Male and cis-gender allies are essential partners in the struggle for equality of opportunity. All are encouraged to show up and to contribute to the discussion.

 

EMPOWERING LGBTQ STUDENTS IN A GLOBAL CONTEXT: COLLABORATIVE APPROACHES TO EXPAND ACCESS,SUPPORT & SUCCESS
Clark, Room 309

Presenters: 

  • Lukman Arsalan, Trinity College
  • Jennifer Melton, International School Bangkok
  • Tony Adey, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Grenfell Campus
  • Casey Nolen Jackson, Antwerp InternationalSchool
  • Jorge Delgado, Brandeis University

This session will explore a range of complex questions,challenges and opportunities facing our LGBTQ global scholars. How can universities and high school counselors work together in the college search and selection process?How does the student’s culture and other intersecting identities impact their academic and social resilience? What are the best practices at high schools and universities supporting current students through facilities, support groups and clubs, housing policies, advocacy and more?These questions and more will be explored while inviting active discussion about current literature on LGBTQ resilience and implications within international education.

 

U.K. - SOFT BREXIT, HARD BREXIT - SPECULATING ON THEFUTURE OF U.K. HIGHER EDUCATION
Strosacker Auditorium
Presenters:

  • Elisabeth Marksteiner, International School ofZug and Luzern
  • Rachel Lister, University of Cambridge
  • Holly Smith, University of Sussex
  • David Nightingale, University of Kent

If, as expected, Teresa May invokes Article 50 notifying theE.U. of the U.K.’s intention to withdraw, in two years’ time,the norms we’ve come to expect will be very different.U.K. universities are working together to put the case for the benefits of higher education, but in this moderated discussion, we’ll ask participants to speculate what studentsentering university post-Brexit might expect. What happens to visas? What about fees? What about lecturers? While‘no man is an island’, is the U.K. heading towards loosening global ties?

EXTRA! EXTRA! WE READ ALL ABOUT IT
Bingham, Room 103
Presenters:

  • Sara Riggs, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Nora Colman, Tulane University
  • Hebe Fuller, Elon University

In the current landscape, many admission offices have begun introducing extra elements to the review process to supplement the more traditional metrics of an application in hopes of truly achieving a holistic review.In this session, we will explore how several institutions are considering these non-traditional pieces of an application—like interviews, online profiles, face-to-face or virtual interactions, etc. This session is ideal for college and university representatives pondering how to best use “extras” in the evaluation process and for school counselors looking for a transparent explanation of how these elements are being used for evaluation.


Session Block 2

Wednesday, July 12 | 10:45 a.m. - 12 p.m.

 

ROAD WARRIOR REVERSAL: BEST PRACTICES FOR COUNSELOR VISITS TO CAMPUS
Tinkham Veale University Center, Ballroom C

Presenters: 

  • Kate Dobson, Indiana University - Purdue University Indianapolis
  • Kristi Marchesani, University of Northern Iowa
  • Umair Khan, United States Educational Foundation in Pakistan
  • Lewis Cardenas, Saint Peter’s University

For three consecutive years, EducationUSA Pakistan has brought high school counselors to several universities across the U.S. Hear what went well and lessons learned from several of the programs participants, both from the visitor and host perspectives. Session attendees from the college and high school sides alike can expect to leave this session with tips on how to improve their own campus visit experiences and will have time to engage in reflective discussion and idea-sharing.

 

COUNSELING STUDENTS THROUGHOUT THE ART SCHOOL APPLICATION PROCESS
Mandel Center, Room 115

Presenters:

  • Angela Jones, Tufts University
  • Jolynn Vallejo, California College of the Arts 
  • Yaritza Pena, Massachusetts College of Art and Design
  • Jackson Moore, School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Students seeking a degree in the visual arts often face some unique options and challenges during their college search; the more information secondary counselors have about these options, the better equipped they will be to counsel their student-artists through the process. In this engaging and informative exchange, representatives from four U.S. art and design schools will provide counselors with an understanding of the differences in art school degrees and curriculum; tips and tools for aiding students with portfolio preparation and submission; information on pre-college programs and why they matter so much; and data to support the arts as a viable career path. University reps will also gain some language to use when talking about their own visual art programs and will benefit from learning about options within the art school world. 

 

SEOUL SEARCHING: KOREAN UNIVERSITY ROAD TRIP
Linsalata Alumni Center, Ballroom

Presenters: 

  • Brianna Palmer, Bangkok Patana School
  • Joe Tavares, Jakarta Intercultural School
  • Lucien Giordano, Dulwich College Suzhou
  • Wilson Lee, Yongsan International School of Seoul

A group of international high school counselors recently went on a grand tour of Korean universities to meet with admission officers of a dozen universities in Seoul to get the most up-to-date information about what Korean universities are looking for. Hear what they learned as well as their impressions from campus visits. By attending this session, you will take away information and resources you can share with your Korean community in the coming school year.

 

SPGP UPDATE
Mandel Center, Room 108

Presenters:

  • Ffiona Rees, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Nancy Beane, The Westminster Schools
  • Jayne Fonash, Loudoun Academy of Science 

This is a NACAC required session that will update the membership on changes to the Statement of Principles of Good Practice, policy statements to guide the work of the organization and to maintain high standards of integrity and practice among its members to better serve students.

 

HARVARD, STANFORD OR BEST? GUIDING STUDENTS TO A THOUGHTFUL COLLEGE LIST
Rockefeller, Room 301

Presenters:

  • Arun Ponnusamy, Collegewise
  • Marie Whalen, Whitworth University
  • Wendy Bigler, International School of Asia, Karuizawa

For many international students applying to U.S. universities, rankings and reputation can take on an outsized role when crafting a final college list. This is often a detriment not only to the student’s success in the application process, but also their sense of purpose. In this session, two veteran counselors and one highly regarded admission officer will dive into specific strategies that will support counselors seeking to help low-information students cut through overly influential factors and build lists based not on prestige or marketing, but the student’s personal needs and goals. 

 

AROUND THE WORLD IN 12 APPLICATIONS
T
inkham Veale University Center, Ballroom B

Presenters:

  • David Hawkins, Hawkins Global Education
  • Hannah Minturn, Colegio Alberto Einstein
  • Jack Shull, Taipei European School
  • Chemeli Kipkorir, African Leadership Academy

There is a wonderful array of lesser-known university destinations for students that will never qualify for an International ACAC session on their own. In this session, a team of counselors covering the wide geographical reach of our profession will each present on three countries’ higher education systems with key takeaways that can help bring new options to your students. A university admission officer will offer input from the university side. Covering Europe, Africa, Asia, and Central and South Americas, come and find out about 12 exciting new options for the hard-to-please student.

 

LAWYERS, DOCTORS AND VETERINARIANS: HELPING YOUR SUPER-ACHIEVERS NAVIGATE THE INTERNATIONAL ADMISSION PROCESS FOR THE TOUGHEST ADMITS IN THE WORLD
Peter B. Lewis Building, Room 203

Presenters: 

  • Kate Whiston, Keele University
  • Jenna Hartsell, British Council USA
  • James Bishop, The George Washington University
  • Chris Lawrance, The University of Sydney
  • Brian McDonald, Collingwood School

Internationally minded super-achieving students with aspirations of becoming a doctor, lawyer or veterinarian will often apply to multiple countries to make their dream a reality. As well as being highly competitive, these programs often have complex admissions requirements including interviews, additional exams and scenario tests. In this session, we’ll explore the different undergraduate admissions processes for these programs in Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom and the United States. In addition, we will explore the return journey that graduates make into employment once they return home or move to their next country.

 

GRADUATE EMPLOYABILITY—FROM CLASSROOM TO CAREER PATH
Tinkham Veale University Center, Ballroom A

Presenters:

  • Sherrie Huan, The University of Sydney
  • Anne Kuijs, Tilburg University
  • Alix Hernandez Reyes, York University
  • Michelle Lui, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
  • Beste Cobek, Hisar School 

Out of the suite of QS university ranking tables, the one about Graduate Employability is the only one that examines higher education outside classrooms. After its pilot edition in 2015, QS published its Graduate Employability Rankings in October 2016, celebrating institutions that are committed to and effective in preparing students for the workplace. Five indicators were used in the scoring process: employer reputation (30 percent), alumni outcomes (20 percent), employer partnerships (25 percent), employer-student connections (15 percent), graduate employment rate (10 percent). A group of leading universities from Australia, Canada, Netherlands and Hong Kong and a high school in Turkey will examine how universities and high schools help students to shape dreams and break shells to support students for their successful employability. The discussion will address student’s workforce-readiness from the following perspectives:

  • Resources, systems and services at institutional level that enable students to gain skills required in the workforce
  • Support (or rather, lack of it) at government level
  • Industry engagement onshore and offshore and the challenges in implementation
  • Immigration policies in each country that facilitate or hinder international students in their employment seeking process
  • Career advice in high school

This session will be a joint presentation. Some case studies will be referred to. Q&A time will be incorporated into the session.

 

THE INTERNATIONAL KIDS NEXT DOOR: ADJUSTING ADMISSION PROCESSES TO THE RISE OF U.S.-BASED F1 STUDENTS
Ford Auditorium

Presenters:

  • John Beck, Due West Education
  • Greg Edleman, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Caitlin Kelley, University of Alabama
  • Isthier Chaudhury, University of Rochester

It’s always been fluid, but the definition of “international student” has been complicated even further by the rapid growth of the international boarding school population in the U.S. These students often face unique challenges in the admissions process and present their own challenges to a selection process that can no longer be neatly divided between domestic and international. Admission representatives from a wide cross-section of U.S. institutions will share their experiences and advice for managing this tricky population.

 

THE ONLY ONE IN THE OFFICE: DEVELOPING A DIVERSE AND INCLUSIVE ADMISSION STAFF
Clark, Room 309

Presenters:

  • Kristoffer Toribio, Orange Coast College
  • Olivia Loo, University of California, Los Angeles
  • April Crabtree, University of San Francisco
  • Traci Lew, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona

Categorically, the international enrollment management profession is not as inclusive as the applicant pool we review. Four enrollment professionals will discuss their efforts to recruit and develop staff from a variety of experiences. The session will share what institutions can do to attract and retain diversity in admission offices, address findings on how to effectively communicate and mentor staff from a variety of backgrounds, and share ideas on how new staff members can participate in ongoing discussions of access and inclusion in the profession.

 

RED, BLUE, PURPLE: MEDIA, PERCEPTION AND REALITY 
Millis Schmitt Auditorium

Presenters: 

  • Paul Greene, United Nations International School
  • Shaun McElroy, Shanghai American School - Puxi Campus
  • Hebe Fuller, Elon University
  • Sara Riggs, Georgia Institute of Technology

In the wake of a shifting political climate, some students have raised questions about studying in “red” U.S. states and regions. News and popular media have elements of truth and hype. What is it really like “on the ground” for international students, students of color, LGBTQ students or other students outside of the perceived “norm” in those geographic areas? Come ready to participate in a lively, respectful discussion dispelling myths and stereotypes and addressing reality. Conversation will be focused on ways in which we can better serve our students as both school counselors and university representatives.

  • Counselors: How do we help keep strong college/university fits on student lists?
  • University Reps: How can/should we position ourselves for recruiting in the current landscape?
  • Everyone: How does this affect our conversations with students? Is additional outreach needed? Alternate messaging?

This session is primarily focused on the U.S. but could be applicable in the U.K. and other parts of the world.

 

INTROVERT OR EXTROVERT: HOW TO HELP EACH OTHER SURVIVE IN INTERNATIONAL ADMISSIONS
DeGrace, Room 312

Presenters:

  • Valerie Martin, Gettysburg College
  • Kelly Braun, International School of the Sacred Heart
  • Brendan Graham, Northeastern University

While the admission profession tends to attract extroverts, there is also a fair share of us who are introverted. In the international admission world, these personality differences are even more pronounced. This session will help you to learn about your own personality style and preferences relating to introversion and extroversion, as well as help you understand your opposite. The end goal is to celebrate our differences and learn to help each other survive the international admission landscape.

 

PREDICTED GRADES/UNPREDICTABLE OUTCOMES 
Strosacker Auditorium

Presenters:

  • Marie Vivas, International Baccalaureate Organization
  • Karen Karydoayanes, Bentley University
  • Anna Boyd, UWC Atlantic College
  • David Zutautas, Brock University
  • Jenny Thacker, The University of Edinburgh

Predicted grades are in part a measure of what knowledge a student has mastered and how the IB is being delivered. And yet, such measurements result in stress on schools, students and parents. Should IB projections be reported to colleges and universities? Is this information optional? What are the advantages and disadvantages of the prediction of final grades? How can schools present information in a profile which is helpful to both colleges and to families who are considering the IB?


Session Block 3

Wednesday, July 12 | 1:45 p.m. - 3 p.m.

 

MERIT, NEED AND MORE: BROADENING THE DISCUSSION OF FINANCIAL AID TO HELP MAKE COLLEGE DREAMS REAL
Tinkham Veale University Center, Ballroom A

Presenters: 

  • Susan Whipple, Marquette University
  • Claudia Botero, Marymount School Medellin 
  • Jacob Wooden, Indiana University 

Too often, financial aid conversations tend to reduce to a series of numbers that can complicate more than they explain. This session will leverage the insights of college admission officials from public and private universities, urban and rural settings, and high schools. How can we broaden the conversation to look at affordability from a broader vantage point? Beyond need and merit, this session will also look at work, transfer credit policies, joint degrees and other strategies for increasing access.

 

TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL SECONDARY SCHOOL PROGRAMS: ACCEPTABLE FOR UNIVERSITY ADMISSION?
Tinkham Veale University Center, Ballroom B

Presenters:

  • Kathleen Freeman, SpanTran: The Evaluation Company
  • Emily Tse, International Education Research Foundation, Inc. (IERF)
  • Jim Crawley, Alma College
  • Jennifer Tkacz, George Mason University

Many countries have technical and vocational secondary school programs that prepare students for employment in fields such as engineering, healthcare and business, but are these programs acceptable preparation for university admission? This session will review secondary technical and vocational qualifications from selected countries to help you understand these qualifications and determine if they are sufficient for admission to your institution.

 

BEHIND THE SCENES: THE EVOLUTION OF INDIA'S SCHOOLS, THE RIPPLE EFFECT OF THE INDIAN GOVERNMENT'S NATIONALISTIC REGULATIONS AND THE FUTURE IMPACT ON VISA RESTRICTIONS IN THE UNITED STATES
Tinkham Veale University Center, Ballroom C

Presenters:

  • Raghvendra Singh, University of Missouri
  • Preeti Samuel Rajendran, UWC Mahindra College
  • Shilpa Gupta, Neerja Modi School

With a 7 percent growth in 2015–2016, the number of international students studying in the U.S. grew to more than one million last year. Spearheading this growth, India saw an increase of 24.9 percent. While India appears to be a fertile ground for international students, the challenges faced by Indian schools reflect a different reality. Through a series of governmental laws including the Right to Education Act, Indian schools seem to be measuring progress based on infrastructure, enrollment and midday meals as opposed to learning outcomes. Moreover, as an increasingly growing number of students choose private-aided and unaided schools over public schools, it is important to investigate if the government’s bureaucratic regulations are responsible for slowing progress within India’s education sector. Along with new governmental regulations, the year 2017 also brings its own share of challenges for Indian international students perplexed by the anti-immigrant rhetoric promulgated by the U.S. presidential elections. The possible threat of the U.S. government creating laws that add challenges in the issuance of H-1B visas and mandating the hiring of “Americans first” to American companies has created an environment of uncertainty, thus leading many international students to consider pursuing higher education in alternate destinations.      

 

MANAGING RISK IN AN UNCERTAIN WORLD: SECURITY AND SAFETY PROTOCOLS FOR STAFF AND STUDENT MOBILITY
Strosacker Auditorium

Presenters:

  • Dominic Milne, University of Aberdeen
  • Kimberley Tritton, University of Kent
  • Matt Stiegemeyer, Concordia University

What protocols does your organization have in place in the event of an emergency situation arising overseas? Does this apply equally to staff and students? How do you assess risk for staff and student mobility? Do any of us have this right? Hear from an experienced panel of international colleagues from both sides of the desk discussing examples of robust planning for high- and low-risk countries, examples of when things have gone wrong, and crisis/emergency response protocols. 

  

LAUNDRY 101: THE CLASS THAT WAS NEVER TAUGHT
Millis Schmitt Auditorium

Presenters:

  • Zoe Williams, Tanglin Trust School
  • Marco Chavez, The Ohio State University
  • Denise Nijhuis, University College Roosevelt
  • Holly Heibein, International School of Phnom Penh   
  • Berta Liao, Hsinchu International School
  • Christina McDade, American Community School of Abu Dhabi
  • Nakul Malik, The University of British Columbia

The aim of the session is to explore ways in which high school counselors and admission teams can work together to prepare students for the transition from being a high school student to a college student. How can high school counselors and college admission teams work together after the May acceptances to ease the move for students? We will look at issues international students face as they arrive but also common themes for any students going to college, such as cooking, laundry, finances, etc. After all the attention given to a student when they apply what is left for students to do once they have accepted a place? How easy is it for schools and colleges to work together on a program of “life skills”? Are there any circumstances as a counselor when you should be speaking with a university prior to the arrival of your graduates? What would universities like to see more of from schools in prepping students for college life, and what would schools like universities to tell them about common problems new college students face? What can parents do to prep their sons and daughters for leaving home and likewise what support can we offer parents when they have to deal with an “empty nest.” This will be an interactive session with resource sharing, ideas from schools and universities alike and positive approaches to student welfare issues.

  

BLOOD, SWEAT AND CHEERS: BUILDING YOUR COUNSELING PROGRAM
Ford Auditorium

Presenters:

  • Junita Sockalingam, Hwa Chong Institution
  • Tannaz Daver, St Joseph’s Institution International School

How do you build your counseling program and take it to the next level? We will present case studies from schools ranging from well-established schools and to brand-new schools. This includes an overview of the events and services we provide for staff, students and parents; the processes we set up to increase students’ self-reflection and decision-making capacities; the tools we develop to support our processes; and the environment we build to enhance counselling and learning.

  

USING ENGLISH PROFICIENCY SCORES WELL IN THE ADMISSION PROCESS
Mandel Center, 108

Presenters:

  • Teresa Axe, TOEFL/Educational Testing Service
  • Jonathan Burdick, University of Rochester
  • Steven Shaw, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York

English proficiency is an important part of the admission process, but knowing how to understand these test scores and use them well can be a challenge. In this session, two senior admission professionals who served as members of the TOEFL board will provide best practices that can be applied to any English proficiency test. Presenters will discuss what they have learned about English proficiency and how this knowledge impacted the admission practices at their own institutions.

 

HELPING FAMILIES NAVIGATE THE FORMS: ISFAA, FAFSA, CSS AND MORE
Mandel Center, Room 115

Presenters:

  • Chemeli Kipkorir, African Leadership Academy
  • Asuman Okman, The Koc School
  • Kaye-Lani Laughna, Davidson College

ISFAA, FAFSA, CSS—it’s like alphabet soup when it comes to applying for financial aid these days. International students (regardless of their citizenship) and their families often struggle to make heads or tails of these forms and their many (so many!) questions. And then comes the conversation about how to answer all those questions accurately and honestly. Emotions and stress run can high as fear, pride and strongly held cultural mores come into play. Our session will offer practical recommendations and advice based on lessons learned over more than 35 years of collective work advising international students and their families as they navigate the U.S. financial aid application process from afar.

 

"WHY DO LIONS HAVE MANES?" OR "TELL ME A BIT ABOUT YOURSELF"—WHAT TO EXPECT IN ADMISSIONS INTERVIEWS AROUND THE WORLD 
Linsalata Alumni Center, Ballroom

Presenters:

  • Mallika Ramdas, United Nations International School
  • Kim Zwitserloot, University College Utrecht
  • Laura Severin, Yale-NUS College
  • Sandra Labrecque, Ecole Hôtelière de Lausanne
  • Maral Dadourian, University College London (UCL)

Interviews may be optional or required as part of the university admissions process in several different parts of the world. Admissions representatives from a range of universities in several countries—including the Netherlands, Singapore, Switzerland and the U.K.—will discuss the nature of their interviews and the role they play in the admissions process. The session will also touch on the role of interviews in U.S. college admissions. Panelists will help those on the high school side guide students on how to prepare for these interviews. The conversation will be moderated by a high school counselor experienced in the challenge of counseling multi-country applicants in international schools with very diverse student populations. We welcome audience contributions on both the high school and admission sides about student interview experiences in the admission process.

 

U.S. HIGHER EDUCATION: HIGH QUALITY, HIGH COST AND HOW TO PAY FOR IT
Clark, Room 309

Presenters:

  • Clay Hensley, The College Board
  • Meredith McDill, Smith College
  • Julie Chapman, Vanderbilt University
  • Maxwell Tracy, University of Vermont

Fewer than one in ten international undergraduate students in the U.S. are primarily supported by institutional financial aid (IIE Open Doors 2016 Report). While College Board data shows an increasing number of U.S. institutions offering international students financial aid, and in larger amounts. However, the differences in availability of aid and institutional financial aid policies is wide and often poorly understood by students and their parents. This session will present participants with the latest information on international student financial aid trends, as well as case studies highlighting best practices for finding the right college for the right student, regardless of student budget.

 

CSI: CREDENTIAL SUBMISSION INFORMATION 
DeGrace, Room 312

Presenters:

  • Colin Wiggins, John Jay College of Criminal Justice 
  • Bridget Moore, Connecticut College

This workshop will go over best business practices for requesting, receiving and maintaining foreign credentials for international admission offices. Topics include: What constitutes “original” documentation with samples, helpful rubrics for maintaining the integrity of collected information and tips for requesting foreign credentials from different educational and governmental bodies.

 

MEETING EACH OTHER HALFWAY
Rockefeller, Room 301

Presenters:

  • Marco Dinovelli, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  • Erin Nicolls, Taipei European School 
  • Erin Guth, Beloit College
  • Nicole McInteer, Wake Forest University
  • Aidan Crowley, SJI International School
  • Krista Despotovic-Jacobson, International School of Geneva, La Chataigneraie

Each and every year admissions officers travel around the world to meet with students and counselors at high schools with the hope of matching students with their best choice for furthering their education. While these visits are a vital part of our professions, there are times where admissions officers and/or college counselors are left disappointed by their counterpart not holding up their end of the visit. We believe that a little education on what each side is looking for would go a long way to eliminating much of this disappointment. Using data gathered from a survey of admissions officers and college counselors, we will explore what each side sees as the minimum expectations for their counterparts during a visit, in a hope of creating a greater understanding across our field. Admission and counseling professionals from a range of institutions will share some of their tips for creating a successful visit experience. New to the field? Come learn about what you should be doing! Think you already know how to hold up your end of the bargain? Come share your perspective with us. There is no person too junior or too senior for this session.

 

BLOWING THE WHISTLE ON THE TRUMPET PLAYERS (WHAT'S HOT AIR, WHAT'S NOT FAIR)
Peter B. Lewis Building, Room 203

Presenters:

  • Jennifer Dewar, Washington University in St. Louis
  • International ACAC Admissions Practices Committee Members 

Join the admissions practices committee for a lively and interactive session where we’ll review NACAC’s Statement of Principles of Good Practice. Through case studies we’ll explore some of the more hot-button issues related to ethics for our membership. We’ll also share updates on NACAC’s committee working on revising the SPGP.

 


Session Block 4

Thursday, July 13 | 8:45 a.m. - 10 a.m.

 

CAN YOU HAVE IT ALL? GENDER, FAMILY AND WORK IN THE INTERNATIONAL ADMISSION WORLD
Mandel Center, Room 108

Presenters:

  • Tara Lindros, Wesleyan University
  • Bobbe Fernando, New York University
  • Kathryn Timlin, Georgetown University
  • Emile Dickson, University of Wisconsin-Madison

As we all know, working in international admission is demanding—weeks of travel all over the world, long hours and busy schedules. What happens when you try to do this work with children and family at home? Can you really have it all and stay in this field? Is there such thing as work/life balance? Join a panel of experienced international admission officers with children who will share their challenges and advice, and ask for contributions from the attendees as well. We will also present survey data on international admission officers with children and how they have navigated the field. 

 

VIETNAM AND MYANMAR: AN ADMISSIONS GUIDE 
Rockefeller, Room 301

Presenters:

  • Caitlin Worsham, American Education Group, Vietnam
  • Beau Benson, New York University
  • Brendan Graham, Northeastern University
  • Mick Amundson-Geisel, International School Yangon
  • Adam Wu, University of La Verne

In this forum, a panel of experts on the regions will speak about recruitment opportunities in Vietnam and Myanmar. We will discuss the respective regional landscapes and the challenges of tours, school visits, consultants and agents. We will then move into a discussion of applicants, with topics ranging from transcripts and translations to essays and financial aid in public and private schools. Finally, we will review student outcomes based on select data from New York University, Northeastern University and University of La Verne.

 

UCAS SUPER SESSION: THE U.K.'S APPLICATION PROCESS, EXAMINING PERSONAL STATEMENTS AND REFERENCES, AND AN OPEN DISCUSSION ON ALL THINGS UCAS
Tinkham Veale University Center, Ballroom C

Presenters:

  • Holly Smith, University of Sussex
  • James Durant, UCAS
  • Jonathan Tate, Dubai College
  • Maral Dadourian, University College London (UCL)
  • Liam McHale, Imperial College London

The U.K. remains one of the most popular destinations for students looking to study internationally, and supporting your students and colleagues through the UCAS application system is key in receiving offers to study at top universities in the U.K. Led by experienced U.K. admission, college counseling and UCAS professionals, this session caters for beginners to veterans in UCAS knowledge sharing and discussion. You can expect to cover:

How to become a registered UCAS center, and access adviser guides, resources and tools, including an overview of new UCAS materials available.

  • Identifying key dates and stages in the UCAS process, and how to recognize when your students may need unique or additional support.
  • A statistical update on the latest trends using data from the 2017 application cycle.
  • An examination of what makes effective Personal Statements and References, in addition to common mistakes, misconceptions and bad advice.

An open discussion of all things UCAS, the panel welcomes questions, conundrums and examples to discuss and evaluate!

  

BRIDGING UNDERSTANDING: HEAR WHAT CHINESE COUNSELORS SAY ABOUT U.S. COLLEGE ADMISSION, THE CHINA MARKET AND SUCCESSFUL PRACTICES FROM THE ADMISSION SIDE 
Linsalata Alumni Center, Ballroom

Presenters:

  • Xiaofeng Wan, Amherst College
  • Nan Zhang, Shanghai High School International Division
  • Xiaobo (Percy) Jiang, Keystone Academy
  • Shiny Wang, Tsinghua International School
  • Julie Chapman, Vanderbilt University

As the number of Chinese students studying in the U.S. continues to surge, and the practical need of enrolling them continues to be a priority for many institutions, a deeper understanding of the market and the country seems more vital than ever. Come hear what school-based counselors in China say about U.S. college admission, effective ways of mutual communication, their takes on the authenticity of Chinese applications and challenges they face daily in the up-and-coming college counseling profession in China based on a widely-participated survey. In addition, seasoned high school counselors from China will bring you their first-hand knowledge on all these issues as well as in-depth analysis of the new law that will impact recruitment in China and the potential impact of current U.S. political climate on the growth trend. We will also share successful practices from the admission side on combating fraudulent applications, building effective communication channels with China and more.

  

CANADIAN COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY OPTIONS—A WORLD OF POSSIBILITIES/UN MONDE DE POSSIBILITES
Strosacker Auditorium

Presenters:

  • Matt Steigemeyer, Concordia University
  • James Boobar, American Collegiate Institute
  • Meagan Vande Vooren, Huron University College
  • Joshua Mosher-Mandel, George Brown College
  • Nakul Malik, The University of British Columbia

This session will provide the guidance counselor community an overview of the different educational systems in Canada and the credentials offered. The presentation will review the differences between post-secondary institutions including CEGEP, colleges, universities and affiliated university colleges. A high school counselor will share their views of some of the differences in between Canada and other international education destinations.

 

LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES THE EUROPEAN WAY
Ford Auditorium

Presenters:

  • Alexander Whitcomb, Erasmus University College
  • Paul Teulon, King’s College London
  • Emily Allen, Cape Cod Academy
  • Frederika Cazemier, University of Groningen

Gone are the days when the sole place one could look to for a liberal arts and sciences education was the U.S. In the past few decades many liberal arts programs have sprung up across Europe, and pretty successfully, too. This session will examine the European model of liberal arts and how it distinguishes itself from its U.S. counterpart. Admission representatives from liberal arts colleges across Europe will provide a synopsis of what is available in the region and talk about the benefits and challenges of studying liberal arts and sciences in Europe. A counselor’s perspective will be given to highlight the best-fit students for this type of degree in this part of the world. Alumni stories will be used to illustrate the valuable skills that students gain and can put to use in their careers after studying liberal arts and sciences in Europe.

 

A CROSS-COUNTRY COMPARISON: BEST PRACTICES IN GLOBAL STUDENT RECRUITMENT 
Peter B. Lewis Building, Room 203

Presenters:

  • Katryna Snow, Council of International Schools
  • Carolyn Barr, Leiden University
  • Christopher Flores, Hamilton College
  • Kieron Broadhead, Goldsmiths College, University of London
  • Robert Finlayson, Carleton University 

How do you choose where and how to conduct international student recruitment? What data do you use when making decisions? Is your best option solo travel, large group tours, consortium travel, virtual methods or something else altogether? Join our multi-national panel for a look at how universities in Canada, the United States, the United Kingdom and Europe make decisions about where and how they recruit. What can we learn from our colleagues in other parts of the world? Attendees will walk away with insight into how a variety of global universities are making decisions and with ideas on how to enhance their own institutional recruitment.

 

“HE'S A FINE YOUNG MAN”: HOW TO WRITE AND READ LORs WITH AWARENESS OF CULTURAL CONTEXT AND BIAS
Mandel Center, Room 115

Presenters:

  • Pamela Kelly Wetzell, UWC South East Asia, East Campus
  • Mallika Ramdas, United Nations International School
  • Lin Larson, University of California, Berkeley
  • Michael Yang, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Letters of recommendation (LORs) are part of the university admissions process in several different parts of the world. On the high school side, the way in which LORs are written may be influenced by the writer’s own background, his/her perspective of the applicant’s cultural context as well as his/her understanding of the purpose of the LOR. On the admission side, how LORs are interpreted may be affected by both the reader’s own background and his/her perspective on the country, educational system and particular high school from which the applicant comes. This panel will explore how college counselors, teachers and university admission officers may be bringing their own biases and understanding of cultural context to the table when writing and interpreting LORs and how raising awareness can help to mitigate such biases and reduce potential misunderstandings. Panelists will unpack phrases like the one in the title and share and review some actual LORs, welcoming input from the audience.

 

EXTERNAL READERS AND HOLISTIC REVIEW? SUCCESSFUL WAYS ADMISSIONS AND COUNSELORS COLLABORATE IN READING APPLICATIONS 
Tinkham Veale University Center, Ballroom B

Presenters:

  • Olivia Loo, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Misa Kabashima, Seattle Academy
  • Lucien Giordano, Dulwich College Suzhou
  • Brooke Cutler, Pepperdine University
  • Swati Shrestha, Woodstock School

Public/private universities and high school counselors discuss the benefits and opportunities in collaborating during the holistic review process. Universities will share their experiences regarding the use of external readers and how it has enhanced their selection of students. School counselors will discuss how their involvement in reading for universities has informed their work with their students during college selection and application. This session will also address best practices on how admission offices can establish a plan to collaborate with counselors/external readers as part of their holistic review.

 

DONDE ESTAS CORAZON? UPDATES AND TIPS ON LATIN AMERICAN RECRUITMENT AND COLLABORATION FROM THE HEART OF THE REGION 
Tinkham Veale University Center, Ballroom A

Presenters:

  • Jolynn Vallejo, California College of the Arts
  • Jacqueline Villa Evanko, UWC South East Asia, Dover 
  • Christopher Bakes, Yale University
  • Jennifer Tassell, Balboa Academy
  • Hector Lopez, New eXponential Thought Organization

Join us for a session that will run through updates from the region and will look at innovative ways to start student recruitment in Latin America or improve your already existing recruitment plan. Local Latin American counselors and seasoned admission representatives will share past experiences and strategic plans that involve building collaborative relationships and best practices in the region. Take as little or as much as you need from this session - be prepared to get your Latin groove on.

  

MANAGEMENT HACKS—HOW TO GET THE MOST OUT OF YOUR STAFF AND YOURSELF 
Clark, Room 309

Presenters:

  • Mitsuko Leonard, University of California, Davis
  • Samuel Dunlop, Portland State University
  • Seth Walker, Indiana University
  • Kathleen Schultz, Dulwich College Shanghai 

Management of staff is a great responsibility but it isn’t always easy. And then there’s managing your colleagues, your co-workers and, let’s be honest, your boss. It can be a complicated game trying not to micro-manage while also not being neglectful. Come ready to discuss and share your best approaches at management, including how you manage yourself. Because really, it all starts with you.

  

COLLABORATION OVER COMPETITION: HOW THE SCHOOLS OF THE BIG TEN WORK TOGETHER TO ACHIEVE THEIR GOALS 
DeGrace, Room 312

Presenters:

  • Marco Dinovelli, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  • Aaron Zdawcyk, Northwestern University
  • Amber Longtin, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Marco Chavez, The Ohio State University
  • Jacob Wooden, Indiana University

In international recruitment we often see those who are like us (similar size, programs, location, etc.) as our competition. But what if instead of seeing these schools are your enemy, you found a group of schools a lot like you, and you worked together to meet your recruitment goals? The schools of the Big Ten may be fierce rivals on the playing field, but in international admission we share information, manage an active listserv, travel together, have an annual meeting and so much more. If you’re willing to be open-minded about who you can work with, please join us to learn about all the advantages we’ve gained through our partnership.

  

SUPPORTING STUDENT ATHLETES THROUGH RECRUITMENT
Bingham, Room 103

Presenters:

  • Cory Miller, Branksome Hall
  • Chenjerai Katanda, Education Matters
  • Susan Whipple, Marquette University
  • Iain Harris, Northumbria University
  • Brianna Porter, Bangkok Patana School

This workshop will equip international school counselors with the understanding and tools to better serve the needs of their student athletes. Participants will gain a greater awareness of how to best inform prospective student athletes and their families as they navigate opportunities and procedures of NCAA and the university athletic recruitment process. Alongside U.S. and Canadian opportunities, this year we would also add U.K. options! Be sure to drop by if your student athletes are passionate about pursuing their sport at a high level during university. 


Session Block 5

Thursday, July 13 | 10:45 a.m. - 12 p.m.

 

A VIEW INTO U.K. INTERVIEWS
Peter B. Lewis Building, Room 203

Presenters:

  • Paul Teulon, King’s College London
  • Katrina Edmunds, Institut Le Rosey
  • Rachel Lister, University of Cambridge

This session will provide beginner through to veteran members of International ACAC with an in-depth understanding of the use interviews in U.K. university admissions and suggestions for how to support your students. This interactive session will cover a range of interview types including Oxbridge, medicine and other healthcare professions.

 

A COMPREHENSIVE GUIDE TO A LEVEL AND GCSE CHANGES IN THE U.K. AND GLOBALLY
Tinkham Veale University Center, Ballroom A

Presenters:

  • Vera Bagnyuk, Cambridge International Examinations
  • Basirat Agboola, Pearson
  • Emily Tse, International Education Research Foundation, Inc. (IERF)

Since 2013 there have been significant changes in the U.K. curriculum for both A levels (Advanced Level examinations) and GCSEs. With the implementation taking place in phases by subject area, universities will begin seeing a vast array of old and new qualifications that may make up an international student’s application. This session will help participants understand the changes so they can make informed decisions on international applicants regarding their suitability for and placement in undergraduate degree programs.

 

NEW FEEDERS: INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS' PATHS TO U.S. HIGHER EDUCATION
Tinkham Veale University Center, Ballroom B

Presenters:

  • Lindsay Addington, National Association for College Admission Counseling
  • Anne Richardson, The American School in London
  • Kathleen Schultz, Dulwich College Shanghai
  • Brooke Cutler, Pepperdine University

Enrollment of international students at U.S. high schools is growing, enabling U.S. universities to recruit international students without leaving the country, often in their own backyards. NACAC research shows that nearly 25 percent of international students enroll at U.S. universities from U.S. high school. What does this new trend mean for the field? This session will address questions such as: Do international students have a better chance of being admitted to a U.S. university from a U.S. high school? Do U.S. institutions prefer international students who have a U.S. credential and who have already acclimated to the U.S. academic and social culture? Are U.S. counselors prepared to effectively advise international students? How does this influence the advising of international students abroad who might be looking to transfer to a U.S. high school? Several perspectives on the implications, opportunities and challenges that this trend presents will be provided, including a U.S.-based college counselor, an international college counselor, and two U.S. universities.

 

FOSTERING CULTURAL COMPETENCY
Tinkham Veale University Center, Ballroom C 

Presenters:

  • Seth Walker, Indiana University
  • Eugene Gabay, Lafayette College
  • Dean Mendes, Skidmore College

Interaction with other cultures in and of itself does not make us culturally competent. Considering this, what are universities doing to ensure our recruiters are continually educating themselves? How do we make cultural competency training a priority for all staff members—not only those committed to diversity and inclusion? This session will include dialogue defining cultural competency, training and education standards that should be required for international recruiters and a discussion about leading cultural competency conversations on our campuses.

 

WORKING IN AND WITH THE ONE-PERSON COUNSELING OFFICE 
Linsalata Alumni Center, Ballroom

Presenters:

  • Berta Liao, Hsinchu International School
  • Stephanie Tao, I-Shou International School

Are you in or do you work with a one-person counseling office? In this session we will explore options for counseling offices that don’t have the budget or staff of larger offices and have to balance multiple responsibilities. We will discuss time-, money-, and sanity-saving solutions to everyday issues, including free and low-cost technology resources, and the best ways university representatives and high school counselors can work together to ensure a successful admissions process. No matter what side of the desk you’re on, come share, learn and discuss best practices for running and interacting with a one-person counseling office!

 

ROUNDING OUT THE STORY: INTERVIEWS, DATA AND THE DESIRE TO MAKE GOOD DECISIONS
Rockefeller, Room 301

Presenters:

  • Gloria Chyou, InitialView
  • Michael Steidel, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Jorge Delgado, Brandeis University
  • Solomon Enos, Duke University
  • Kathleen Abels, Haverford College

Student data is like one’s first kiss: Everyone says they want it, but when they get it they realize it’s sloppy and just leads to more questions. In this session we’re going to look at some student data to show how a process comes together. In particular, we’ll be looking at how international student interviews are changing the way that admission officers review other data they receive in the process. Panelists will also provide advice to high school educators about how to advise students about the interviews and their role in a competitive application process.

 

GETTING INVOLVED WITH INTERNATIONAL ACAC
Mandel Center, Room 108

Presenters:

  • Kristin Dreazen, Edvice London
  • Patience Fanella-Koch, Aiglon College
  • Alys Langdale, Marlborough College
  • Becky Konowicz, Santa Clara University
  • Michael Maki, Ridley College

International ACAC is a member-driven organization and relies on volunteers from within the membership to put on webinars, regional Institutes and the summer conference, along with an array of other initiatives. Are you interested in getting more involved in International ACAC? Whether you are interested in the work of the executive board, the standing and ad hoc committees or getting involved in other ways, come hear from volunteers about their experience, why they got involved and the expanding number of ways you could make an impact on the association. 

 

GOING DUTCH 101: AN UPDATE ABOUT STUDYING IN THE NETHERLANDS 
Mandel Center, Room 115

Presenters:

  • Kim Zwitersloot, University College Utrecht
  • Arnoud Monster, Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University
  • Pamela Kelly Wetzell, UWC South East Asia, East Campus
  • Hyam Falconi, Rotterdam University of Applied Sciences

With more than 350 accredited bachelor programs taught entirely in English at highly ranked institutions, the Netherlands is an increasingly popular destination for international students. But its higher education system can be confusing with various forms of selectivity. Numerus Fixus? Studielink? University College? Binding Study Advise? And what about the culture? Will my student fit in as an international student? Are these affordable tuition fees too good to be true?

In this session reps from both the university and high school side will share their knowledge and experience. From the basics of the difference between research universities and universities of applied science to what has changed this year with respect to Numerus Fixus, we will make sure you are on top of your applications that are going Dutch

 

UNDERSTANDING THE IB COURSES: FOR ADMISSION AND COUNSELORS 
Millis Schmitt Auditorium

Presenters:

  • Franko Cifizzari, Western Academy of Beijing
  • Anne Corriveau, Boston University

This session is designed to help admission better understand the specifics of the IB diploma program and courses and provide advice for admission and counselors with contextualizing the student’s curriculum. Topics include: statistical data related to IB courses; how DT, ITGS, TOK, self-taught and film courses should be viewed; examining and interpreting the differences between language levels in groups 1 and 2s; math levels; what “40 points” actually means;  the significance of bilingual diplomas; and “expected” IB grades. We will examine why semester grades might fluctuate and why grade deflation may exist in international schools.

A focus will be on how counselors can help universities (and students) put into context the students’ program, teaching and course selection. Finally, we will discuss breaking myths about the MYP and its difference from the DP.

 

LESSONS FROM THE FRONT LINES: ACCESS AMIDST CONFLICT
Ford Auditorium

Presenters:

  • Karen Kristof, Smith College
  • Shabana Basij-Rasikh, School of Leadership, Afghanistan
  • Nileema Khan, DPS STS School Dhaka
  • Fernando Revelo La Rotta, St. Andrew’s Refugee Services, Egypt
  • Azizullah Royesh, Marefat High School, Afghanistan

Join us for a panel discussion about the college application process for students from countries experiencing ongoing conflict and political unrest. Counselors from this year’s International ACAC Scholar Cohort will address their work in Afghanistan, Bangladesh and Egypt. Learn more about the support systems these colleagues build for students and about the success their students achieve at home and overseas in spite of significant obstacles. What are the challenges refugees face in their quest for higher education? How can girls access opportunities in a society where cultural norms restrict their full participation? How can we prepare these students for a successful transition to university? Panelists will bring valuable insights into these topics—and they also welcome your questions and comments.

 

CONVEY YOUR INSTITUTION'S VIBE VIRTUALLY. ONLINE RECRUITMENT STRATEGIES FOR THE HARD-TO-REACH STUDENT 
Clark, Room 309

Presenters:

  • Alexander Whitcomb, Erasmus University College
  • Carolyn Barr, Leiden University
  • Mark Stacey, International School of Brussels
  • Alix Hernandez Reyes, York University

Globalization has led to the need for recruitment in many different geographical locations. Technology has facilitated the possibility to engage with prospects in meaningful ways from any location online. This session will showcase successful strategies for getting your “virtual vibe” on: how to give prospects the feeling of experiencing your program without them needing to visit in person. MOOCS and virtual experiences will take center stage as examples of successful online outreach in this session.

 

LIVING IN FEAR, FEARING THE U.S. 
Strosacker Auditorium

Presenters:

  • Diva Shrestha, Colby College
  • Jennifer Lee, Victoria Shanghai Academy
  • Misha Garg, Williams College
  • Janan Sabeh, King’s Academy

Recruiting international students is just half the battle. International students hail from more than 100 countries and represent all different races, religions, gender identities and sexualities. How do we ensure that our campuses have the necessary policies, procedures and staff on board to ensure their successful transition and retention, especially given the onboarding of the new administration? This session will highlight and discuss some of the concerns expressed by current and prospective international students relating to the new administration and their personal safety in the United States. The presenters will also discuss how they have supported this group of students through collaboration and advocacy.

 

GAME ON! APPLYING GAMIFICATION TO COLLEGE COUNSELING PROGRAMS
Bingham, Room 103

Presenters:

  • Aaron Andersen, The University of British Columbia
  • Tim Munnerlyn, American School of Warsaw

Take a first look at ways gamification can be applied to college counselling as a strategy for improving high school students’ scope of college search and engagement in the long-term discovery and application process. Learn about the research that indicates the utility of gamification as a tool to facilitate learning. Then discover the potential for how different games and interactive activities can be used to introduce students to colleges and teach practical college application procedures. Examples include social media competitions, best-of existing apps, and in-class activities and games. This session will be interactive and high energy. “This was the best session I have attended at ANY conference in the last eight years. I can’t wait to put a bunch of these ideas into practice. THANK YOU!” - Counselor Evaluation.

 

“IT'S NOT ALL ABOUT YOU" WAIT... BEFORE YOU ARE THIS CLOSE TO SCREAMING THESE WORDS AT YOUR STUDENTS' PARENTS KEEP CALM AND THINK CTCL (COLLEGES THAT CHANGE LIVES) 
DeGrace, Room 312

Presenters:

  • Dilek Aksu, Eckerd College
  • Elisabeth Marksteiner, International School of Zug and Luzern
  • Bridget Herrera, American International School
  • Erin Guth, Beloit College
  • Elizabeth Orr, University of Puget Sound

Come and learn about the proven collaborative techniques that CTCL schools and college counselors have adopted over the years in managing parent expectations, while placing first their students’ personalities, interests, dreams and passions as they find the right-fit schools where these students lead a happy, engaged and successful four years to move onto some of the best careers and graduate schools in the world. Any counselor who believes in the “right-fit” will benefit greatly from this session.


Session Block 6

Thursday, July 13 | 1:45 p.m. - 3 p.m.

  

AUSTRALIA IN THE WORLD 
Bingham, Room 103

Presenters:

  • Chris Lawrance, The University of Sydney
  • Sean McAuley, UWC South East Asia, Dover Campus
  • Tannaz Daver, St Joseph’s Institution International School 

In the post-Brexit era many international students and their parents are looking alternatives.

This session is intended to be a one-stop shop for International ACAC members to learn the basics of applying to the Australian system and learn more about the student experience in Australia. This session will include information on application the Australian system and the financing options.

 

CREATING A COLLEGE COUNSELOR NETWORK
DeGrace, Room 312

Presenters: 

  • Jennifer Tassell, Balboa Academy
  • Joe Tavares, Jakarta Intercultural School
  • Todd Johnson, Colegio Americano de Quito

Let’s face it; college counseling can be an isolating job. You may be the only one doing your job in your school or perhaps in your city. It doesn’t need to be that way. Whether its Panama, Ecuador or Indonesia, collaborating with other counselors in your region can bring more universities to your school, can create a stronger support system and ultimately makes you a better counselor and your students more visible. Panelists will share their experiences: what worked, what didn’t, and how they created comprehensive counselor networks in their own countries.

 

WE SWITCHED! - THE BENEFITS OF EXPERIENCING BOTH SIDES OF THE TABLE
Tinkham Veale University Center, Ballroom C

Presenters:

  • Swati Shrestha, Woodstock School
  • Dwayne Zamora, Stamford American International School
  • Stephanie Tao, I-Shou International School
  • Kaersten Deeds, Dulwich College Beijing

Four former admission counselors from US universities spanning the East Coast, Midwest and West Coast, with Asian territories, have recently switched sides to college counseling at international schools in East and Southeast Asia. We would like to explore the knowledge we’ve gained and the benefits of experiencing the international admission process from both sides, for you and for your students. We will discuss why and how we did it, and reflect on our first year on the job. You’ll leave with strategies and tools on how you can make the move, too, if you feel like your grass is no longer as green or needs a different body of water!

 

TEACH YOUR CHILDREN WELL: BEST PRACTICES FOR YOUNG INTERNATIONAL ADMISSION PROFESSIONALS
Tinkham Veale Center, Ballroom A

Presenters:

  • Sarah Fischer, Vassar College
  • Beau Benson, New York University
  • Elizabeth Orr, University of Puget Sound
  • Andre Kostousov, Northeastern University 

As international admission continues to expand, many offices are beginning to train younger admission professionals in the world of international recruiting and reading. What are recommended trainings or programs that best suit a young professional when starting out in international admission? Furthermore, how can one assess appropriate professional development for young international admission professionals? How can a supervisor ensure that the trainings were accurately internalized, and how can young professionals advocate for themselves if they’re not? Open to supervisors and younger staff, join a conversation on how you can be the best international supervisor and supervisee, and how the needs of both positions can best be fulfilled.

 

HOSTING AN INTERNATIONAL ACAC CONFERENCE
Mandel Center, Room 108

Presenters:

  • Kristin Dreazen, Edvice London
  • Theresa Schweser, International ACAC
  • Johanna Fishbein, UWC South East Asia, Dover Campus
  • Marco Dinovelli, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  • Robert Hardin, University of Oregon
  • Diane Feckanin, Case Western Reserve University

Is your institution considering hosting the annual International ACAC Summer Conference? Join us in this session to hear from past hosts and conference planning coordinators about what to expect, from the request for proposal, the bidding process and what happens after you’ve been selected. Bring your questions to this interactive session, whether you are just beginning to explore the possibility of hosting or are in the process of putting the final touches on your proposal. 

  

WHAT I SEE FROM MY SIDE: USEFUL CRITICISM FROM ACROSS BOTH SIDES OF THE DESK
Millis Schmitt Auditorium

Presenters:

  • Bobbe Fernando, New York University
  • Mark Butt, Emory University
  • Tim Munnerlyn, American School of Warsaw
  • Natalie La Balme, Ecole Jeannine Manuel

Two expert admission officers and two veteran college counselors sit down to critique leadership and ethics in the international admission space. This moderated discussion will deeply explore challenging questions from both perspectives and each side will provide practical criticism from the opposite side of the desk. Through a series of divisive questions related to integrity, decision-making, advising and professional choices, panelists will attempt to find common ground and share effective strategies for bridging the gap that can form between secondary schools and universities.

  

FORBIDDEN CITIES: RECRUITING IN CHINA'S INTERIOR 
Tinkham Veale University Center, Ballroom B

Presenters:

  • Isthier Chaudhury, University of Rochester
  • Shawn Moore, Bard College
  • Rachel Iverson, University of Tulsa

Where would you travel for recruitment in China if the popular destinations of Beijing and Shanghai were off-limits? While there is an abundance of well-qualified students across the rest of mainland China, many travelers are unsure of where to start planning routes and collect the high school contact information they need. Join three Deep China recruitment veterans for a fast-paced tour of cities you should visit beyond the East Coast, how to get there, things to look out for and an introduction to brand new planning resources you can utilize. This session is targeted toward recruitment travelers and will have some limited time at the end for other travel ideas and questions from the audience.

 

WHEN THE CEILING IS INVISIBLE: ADVANCING YOUR CAREER IN A BIASED WORLD
Mandel Center, Room 115

Presenters:

  • Bridget Moore, Connecticut College
  • Tara Lindros, Wesleyan University
  • Joan Liu, UWC South East Asia, East Campus 
  • Jennifer Dewar, Washington University in St. Louis 

Don’t be bossy! Never apologize! Don’t be too nice! But don’t be aloof! Sound familiar? Join a panel of women in various career stages on both sides of the desk discuss the challenges that are unique to women as they advance in their profession. We’ll examine research that dives into the institutional factors and systemic barriers that challenge women as they take on progressively senior roles, as well as personal strategies to overcome these issues. We will also explore the way that as international professionals this navigation is made more complicated by the cultural backgrounds of the diverse demographics of the parents, students, and colleagues we interact with. While this discussion is primarily geared toward female professionals trying to expand their leadership roles, anyone who works with, supervises or hires can benefit from this conversation about unconscious (and conscious) bias in schools and higher ed institutions.

  

GAP YEARS TO GLOBAL UNIVERSITIES: CONNECTING STUDENTS WITH GLOBAL EXPERIENCES 
Peter B. Lewis Building, Room 203

Presenters:

  • Michael Lai, Minerva Schools at KGI
  • Anna Dechert, New York University, Abu Dhabi

In an increasingly globalized world, it is more important than ever for students to develop an understanding of other cultures and a comfort with engaging with diverse backgrounds and belief systems. Despite this importance, students continue to struggle to find opportunities for themselves: 70% of students want to study abroad every year while 9% actually do. In addition, America’s top universities still admit ~90% of their students from the United States. How can we help ensure students who are interested in developing as global citizens have those opportunities to travel to other countries and connect with students from around the world? This session will explore how high school counselors and new, global universities can connect students with the global opportunities they are seeking. Panelists will first share their advising strategies for working with students who are pursuing global opportunities, second provide insights into how admissions processes for these types of programs may differ from other colleges and programs students are considering, and third will open it up for a Q&A. We hope that high school counselors will leave equipped with tools and information to guide students who are seeking international experiences and global communities for college.

 

HOW DO HIGHLY SELECTIVE COLLEGES IN THE UNITED STATES RECRUIT INTERNATIONALLY, SELECT AND ENROLL THEIR INTERNATIONAL CLASSES?
Strosacker Auditorium

Presenters:

  • Xiaofeng Wan, Amherst College
  • David Buckwald, Columbia University
  • Keith Light, Yale University
  • Sulgi Lim, Williams College

With ever increasing numbers of talented international students applying to top colleges in the United States, there are continual shifts in the nuanced evaluation of candidates from around the globe. Do admission officers look at international applications through the same lens as they do for domestic applications? Does the need-blind or need-aware financial aid policy affect international applicants’ chances? How do institutional priorities shape their global recruitment approaches and selection processes? Come to this session to meet with four international admission officers from four highly selective colleges and hear how they describe their institution’s respective approaches to global recruitment, application evaluation and enrollment of their international classes.

  

HOW ARE YOU WORKING WITH STUDENTS IN YOUR CLASSROOM OR PRESENTATION? INNOVATIVE IDEAS TO ENHANCE YOUR PRESENTATIONS AND INTEGRATE THE COLLEGE SEARCH INTO THE CLASSROOM
Clark, Room 309

Presenters:

  • Kelly Braun, International School of the Sacred Heart
  • Kevin Keller, The College of Wooster
  • Heather Pineda, Dulwich College International

This presentation is meant to be a time for professionals to get together and share innovative and new ideas for sprucing up presentations and lesson plans. So many high school counselors spend time in the classroom and we have no official way of sharing what we do with others. College professionals often find it difficult to adjust messaging to cultural norms around the world. Counselors who teach can find it hard to come up with engaging activities for students in the college process. The presenters have experience mixing things up in presentations and the classroom. We will start off with a few of our most successful ideas and then open it up to a short discussion about best ways to share and use resources. Concrete takeaways will be at least three lesson plans for the classroom and two presentation ideas. Ideas and ways to better engage our students, parents, and faculty in this process which is changing every year.

  

COMPETING ON AMERICAN SOIL: EXPLORING U.S. STUDENT RECRUITMENT APPROACHES BY NON-U.S. UNIVERSITIES
Linsala Alumni Center, Ballroom

Presenters:

  • Clay Hensley, The College Board
  • Angolwisye Mwakisu, Jacobs University Bremen

American students are increasingly mobile and global. Many are now looking abroad to find right-fit higher education options, not just for a semester or year study abroad experience, but for the full undergraduate degree. Though the trend is encouraging, in reality how can universities located outside the U.S. effectively identify, recruit, and attract qualified U.S.-based students (and on a tight budget)? This interactive session will offer data-based strategies and practical approaches for presenting the benefits of your global higher ed institution effectively to U.S. school communities (students, parents, and counselors).

 

PREPARING YOUR STUDENTS FOR AN INTERNATIONAL CAREER WITH EUROPEAN HIGHER EDUCATION
Rockefeller Building, Room 301

Presenters:

  • Elena Somoza, IE University
  • Annette Gambach, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology - Carl Benz School of Engineering
  • Peter Tsvetkov, Jacobs University Bremen
  • Barbara Prevosti, Universita Bocconi

Europe is vibrant area offering great job opportunities for students. It is the largest internal market in the world, with many international companies, corporations and organizations having headquarters there. 

The legal framework also allows students to apply for EU-wide work permits that enable them to easily move between EU countries. In this session we will explore how a European University degree prepares students for a global career and the options that students have once they successfully graduated from a European University.

 

COMMUNITY COLLEGES: AFFORDABLE ACCESS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
Ford Auditorium

Presenters:

  • Kristoffer Toribio, Orange Coast College
  • Dane Rowley, California Lutheran University

U.S. community colleges have seen an increase of international student enrollment in the last five years with more than 95,000 enrolled in 2016 (IIE Opens Doors Report). With increased tuition cost and competitive freshman admissions standards at four-year universities, two-year colleges offer a viable starting point for international students pursuing their higher education goals. However, with more students considering transfer admission and more than 1,000 CC’s to choose from, where does one start? How do you counsel students and parents on finding the right fit? What are the true financial and academic benefits of a community college? Hear from both the university/college and the high school sides to learn more about potential costs savings for international students and their families, unique opportunities for students, and pathway programs to four-year institutions.