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Siegal Lifelong Learning

Literature + Writing

Literature + Writing

Saturdays, September 9-October 28 | 10:30 a.m.-noon

No class: September 30

 

Janice Vitullo, Classics Teacher

 

This course offers a guided reading of Homer’s great epic poem the Iliad. Participants will have the opportunity to engage in analysis and discussion of various aspects of the poem, including style, historical context, and the poem’s significance within the literary canon.   Required Text: Homer: The Iliad, translated by Robert Fagles. ISBN# 0140275363. NB: As the Fagles will be heavily referenced during class, students will benefit the most from having this particular translation and are urged not to purchase a different one.

 

Laurel School-Lyman Campus | Lifelong Learning Members: $90; Nonmembers: $110 | REGISTER >

Mondays, September 18-November 6 | 1-2:30 p.m.
 

Joseph Jacoby, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

It would be fun and instructive to sample several of the flood of outstanding books written by women in recent years. We begin with Elizabeth Strout's Pulitzer Prize-winning Olive Kitteridge, a study of a formidable but flawed New England woman. We continue with the remarkably original voice of Penelope Fitzgerald's masterpiece, The Gates of Angels, set in 1913 Cambridge, England. We conclude with Ann Patchett's Commonwealth, a fascinating work based on her own family.  Books: Elizabeth Strout, Olive Kitteridge, Penelope Fitzgerald, The Gates of Angels, and Ann Patchett, Commonwealth

 

Rocky River Public Library | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

Mondays, September 18-November 6 | 1-2:30 p.m.


Terry Meehan, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

We will examine three of Alfred Hitchcock’s films and their literary sources. The written work will be discussed first, followed by a screening and discussion of the film adaptation.    Books:  J. Buchan, The Thirty-Nine Steps, P. Highsmith, Strangers on a Train, and C. Woolrich, Rear Window.

 

Gates Mills Community House | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

 

Tuesdays, September 19-November 7 | 1–2:30 p.m.


Bill Pennington, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

Obviously, this 100-year- old classic by British author Kenneth Grahame appeals to all generations. But according to two, recently-published, annotated versions and an Oxford World Classics special edition, The Wind in the Willows was really written for adults. While we take this fun ride again (or for the first time), we will study and discuss how this enlightening and enriching book came to life; what are some of it’s hidden meanings; what makes it a classic; and what’s in it for us in 2017?  Book: Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows

 

Private Residence: 6814 Rosemont Ave., Brecksville 44141 | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

 

Tuesdays, September 19-November 7 | 7:30-9 p.m.

 

Charlene Mileti, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

In an earlier age, Dante's Divine Comedy provided mankind with a transcendent sense of the universe. Alternatively, in our modern times, Melville's Moby Dick wrested that profound sense of the universal from man. In this broad survey of some of the world's greatest thinkers and writers, the authors argue that the malaise of contemporary society, beset with violence and selfish preoccupation, is the result of man having forgotten the aspirational aspect of life. Because life has become about the persistent acquisition of wealth, power and entertainment, the authors argue we have clearly lost our way to our own humanity.  Book: Hubert Dreyfus and Sean Dorrance Kelly, All Things Shining: Reading the Western Classics to Find Meaning in a Secular Age.  

 

First Unitarian Church | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

 

Thursdays, September 21-November 9 | 10:30-noon

 

Joseph Jacoby, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

It would be fun and instructive to sample several of the flood of outstanding books written by women in recent years. We begin with Elizabeth Strout's Pulitzer Prize-winning Olive Kitteridge, a study of a formidable but flawed New England woman. We continue with the remarkably original voice of Penelope Fitzgerald's masterpiece, The Gates of Angels, set in 1913 Cambridge, England. We conclude with Ann Patchett's Commonwealth, a fascinating work based on her own family.  Books: Elizabeth Strout, Olive Kitteridge, Penelope Fitzgerald, The Gates of Angels, and Ann Patchett, Commonwealth

 

Breckenridge Village | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

 

Thursdays, September 21-November 9 | 10-11:30 a.m.

 

Cheryl Wires, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

T.S. Eliot praised The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins as “the first…and the best of modern English detective novels.” Literary critics concur, crediting Collins, along with Edgar Allan Poe, with creating the detective genre. The moonstone, a sacred diamond stolen from an Indian shrine and bequeathed to a beautiful young woman, mysteriously disappears from her English country house. Collins, writing in 1868, developed a number of elements, which have become popular conventions in contemporary detective fiction.  Books: Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone and Andre Lycett, Wilkie Collins: A Life of Sensation (selected chapters)

 

Middleburg Heights United Church of Christ | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

Mondays, October 2-23 | 1:30-3 p.m.

 

Sylvia Abrams, Lecturer in Lifelong Learning, CWRU

 

Join us for a four-week series on Paulette Jile’s novel News of the World. Set in 1870’s,News of the World centers on the long journey of two unlikely characters, retired Captain Kidd and former Indian child captive Johanna. Nominated for a National Book Award, the book has everything a western novel ought to: strong plot, evocative setting, difficult moral choices, and unforgettable characters.

 

Cuyahoga County Public Library, Orange Branch | Free and open to the public (advanced registration recommended) | REGISTER >

Co-sponsored by the Cuyahoga Country Public Library 

 

Session I: Tuesdays, October 3-November 14 | 1–3 p.m.

Session II: Wednesdays, October 4-November 15 | 1–3 p.m.

 

Linda Tuthill, Instructor in Lifelong Learning, CWRU

 

Creative nonfiction opens its arms to an amazing variety of topics and techniques, from essays related to ideas to memoir birthed by the play of imagination on memory. Writers share work in class, giving and receiving helpful feedback.

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: $90; Nonmembers: $110 |

REGISTER (Session I ) > REGISTER (Session II ) >

Thursdays, October 5-November 16 | 1–3 p.m.
 

Linda Tuthill, Instructor in Lifelong Learning, CWRU

 

Galway Kinnell believes writing a poem is like making an artifact. It is making something physical out of words. In this class poets share their creations with others and receive constructive feedback. Bring 20 copies of a poem you have written to the first class.

 

St. Paul's Episcopal Church | Lifelong Learning Members: $90; Nonmembers: $110 | REGISTER >

 

Thursdays, October 19-November 2 | 7-8:30 p.m.

 

Jackie Czarnota, Lecturer in Lifelong Learning, CWRU

 

Join us for an in-depth look into the works of Margaret Atwood, poet, novelist, literary critic, essayist, and environmental activist. Several of her books will be discussed including The Handmaid's Tale, a poignant look at a world that exists under a strict monopoly of the ruling class, where women are assigned to roles in order to regulate the society's population. Participants are asked to read Parts I-III (pages 1-40) for the first class. The instructor will provide additional readings.

 

Cuyahoga County Public Library, Independence Branch | Free and open to the public (advanced registration recommended) REGISTER >

Co-sponsored by the Cuyahoga Country Public Library