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Siegal Lifelong Learning

Politics + Contemporary Issues

Politics + Contemporary Issues

Mondays, January 22-March 12 | 10:30-noon


Barbara Greenberg, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

Jodi Picoult’s novel Small Great Things focuses on racial tensions in a small hospital that flood out into the larger community. Using this book as our central theme, our classes will discuss the wide range of discrimination in our country today, and whether legislation, including the Civil Rights Act of 1964, has made any difference in America up to now and what the implications are for the future. Are we the same as we were?

Book: Jodi Picoult, Small Great Things

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

 

Tuesdays, January 23-March 13 | 10-11:30 a.m.


Barbara Greenberg, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

In Our Defense by Caroline Kennedy and Ellen Alderman is a primer about the Bill of Rights. Each chapter focuses on one of the first ten amendments of the United States Constitution, using an actual case to study the issues surrounding that amendment.

Each week, students will review one chapter, one amendment and one case, discussing the laws that have developed from those facts. The class will use each case as the springboard for a discussion about how and why laws change, current laws focusing on that amendment and how constitutional amendments and the cases that follow those protected rights affect our daily lives.

Book: In Our Defense, Caroline Kennedy and Ellen Alderman

 

Brecksville United Church of Christ | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

Tuesdays, January 30-April 17 | 1:30–3:30 p.m.

THE WARREN COURT – Part II
Tuesdays, January 30-March 6
In 1954 President Dwight Eisenhower appointed California Governor Earl Warren to be Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. Over the next 16 years the Warren Court would review, interpret and decide cases with far-reaching implications. In this course, we will look at the composition of the court and focus on some of the landmark decisions made from 1961 to 1969.
INSTRUCTOR: Barbara Greenberg, Magistrate, Bedford Municipal Court; Magistrate, Cuyahoga County Juvenile Court Community Diversion Program

No classes March 13, 14, 15 – CWRU Spring Break

BREXIT: WOULD EU BELIEVE IT?
Tuesdays, March 20-April 17
On June 23, 2016, Britain voted to leave the European Union. But why? Britain has had a contentious relationship with the EU since it joined in 1973, but does this explain why it left? Was Brexit an expression of British populism in a year of populist upheavals? Were voters deceived by the post-truth environment in which we seem now to be living? In this course we'll address these questions and more as we examine the consequences of Britain's exit from the EU.
INSTRUCTOR: Luke Reader, SAGES Lecturer, Case Western Reserve University

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: $115; Nonmembers: $135 | REGISTER >

Thursdays, January 18-March 8 | 10:30 a.m.-noon

 

Jim Lane, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

“We have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it,” claims lawyer and author Michelle Alexander. In this book discussion course, students examine the arguments and data Alexander presents to defend her thesis. She argues that our current criminal justice system is an oppressive reality that is played out in a mighty human drama with important consequences for African-Americans and for our entire society. Book: The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, Michelle Alexander

 

Cleveland Skating Club | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

Mondays, March 19-May 7 | 10-11:30 a.m.


Barbara Greenberg, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

Jodi Picoult’s novel Small Great Things focuses on racial tensions in a small hospital that flood out into the larger community. Using this book as our central theme, our classes will discuss the wide range of discrimination in our country today, and whether legislation, including the Civil Rights Act of 1964, has made any difference in America up to now and what the implications are for the future. Are we the same as we were?

Book: Jodi Picoult, Small Great Things

 

Bay United Methodist Church | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

 

Tuesdays, March 20-May 8 | 7:30-9 p.m.


Barbara Greenberg, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

Jodi Picoult’s novel Small Great Things focuses on racial tensions in a small hospital that flood out into the larger community. Using this book as our central theme, our classes will discuss the wide range of discrimination in our country today, and whether legislation, including the Civil Rights Act of 1964, has made any difference in America up to now and what the implications are for the future. Are we the same as we were?

Book: Jodi Picoult, Small Great Things

 

First Unitarian Church | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

 

Thursdays, March 22-May 10 | 1:30-3 p.m.
 

Charlene MiletiLeader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

In the fifth century, Athens, Greece, was a burgeoning democracy, the first of its kind to exist in human history. Born in 494 BCE, Pericles of Athens would rise to become one of the city's most beloved leaders. While Pericles' astute grasp of military and political affairs would place him at the head of Athens' government, he is, nonetheless, more memorably remembered as the tutelary leader of the city. Contrasted with our modern democracies, Pericles' government functioned as the primary source for educating the citizenry in matters of civic and personal virtue. After his death, Athens would never again flourish as it did during Pericles' leadership. Book: Pericles of Athens and the Birth of Democracy, D. Kagan

 

Laurel Lake Community Room | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

Fridays, March 23-May 11 | 10:30 a.m.-noon

 

Joe KonenLeader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

This book offers us a vehicle for a nuanced understanding of Islam. Carla Power, a Western reporter who grew up in several predominantly Muslim countries, writes of her dialogues with prominent India-born and now London-based Sheikh Mohammad Akram Nadwi. The dialogue enlightens us on a nonviolent understanding of Islam. The Sheik shows us how he distinguishes between culture and politics on the one hand and religion and spirituality on the other. Book: If the Oceans Were Ink: An Unlikely Friendship and a Journey to the Heart of the Quran, Carla Power (2015).


St. Paul's Episcopal Church | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >