Skip to Main Content
CWRU Links
Siegal Lifelong Learning

Religion, Philosophy+ Science

Religion, Philosophy+ Science

Thursdays, January 25-March 15 | 10:30 a.m.-noon

 

Jim Van Horn, Leader-Teacher, Off Campus Studies

 

One hundred thousand years ago at least six species inhabited earth. Today, just one. Us. Homo Sapiens. How did our species succeed in the battle for dominance? Create cities and kingdoms?

How did we come to believe in gods, nations, human rights; to trust money, books, laws; and to be enslaved (interesting word, no?) by bureaucracy, timetables, and consumerism? Harari doesn't miss a trick: Cognitive, Agricultural, and Scientific Revolutions. And what will become of us?

Book: Yuval Noah Harari, Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind

 

Hamlet Village Clubhouse | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

 

 

Thursdays, February 1-April 19 | 1:30–3:30 p.m.

AMERICAN LANDSCAPE PAINTING: WILDERNESS, PROGRESS, AND AMERICAN IDENTITY
Thursdays, February 1-March 8
This course explores the shift from the view of the early 19th century, which saw wilderness as something threatening, which should be destroyed, to the view of the late 19th century, which saw wilderness as something to be protected and something that provided psychological relief from the pressures of modern life.
INSTRUCTOR: Henry Adams, Ruth Coulter Heede Professor of Art History, Case Western Reserve University

No classes March 13, 14, 15 – CWRU Spring Break

MEASURING THE WORLD: A HISTORICAL LOOK AT SCIENCE THROUGH THE LENS OF INSTRUMENTS, APPARATUS, AND CLEVER DEVICES
Thursdays, March 22-April 19
Stories of scientific and technological discovery usually focus on bright ideas and revolutionary new thoughts. This short course will instead explore what makes such intellectual leaps possible in the first place: the tools, measurements, and devices that scientists and engineers have used throughout history to help them understand and control the world around us.
INSTRUCTOR: Alan Rocke, Emeritus Professor of History, Case Western Reserve University

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: $115; Nonmembers: $135 | REGISTER >

Wednesdays, March 7–28 | 6:30-8 p.m. 

 

Alanna Cooper, Director of Jewish Lifelong Learning, CWRU

 

The Aleppo Codex is the oldest Hebrew Bible in existence today. Scribed around 900 CE in Tiberius, it traveled to Aleppo, Syria, in the 15th century, where it was preserved for 500 years. From there it was smuggled to Israel just after the founding of the state, but in the process, many of its sacred pages went missing. Explore the significance of the text and the mystery of its loss with Alanna Cooper through a critical read of Matti Friedman’s The Aleppo Codex.

Required Book: The Aleppo Codex, Matti Friedman

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: $60; Nonmembers: $75 | REGISTER >

Mondays, March 19-May 7 | 1-2:30 p.m.

 

Jim Lane, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

Delve into the realms of science, mythology, spirituality, appearance, illusion, and reality as they apply to our place in the natural world. The two novels we will read explore profound personal, societal, philosophical and religious questions.  Books: Siddhartha, Herman Hesse; Ishmael, Daniel Quinn

 

Gates Mills Community House | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

Tuesdays, March 20-May 8 | 10-11:30 a.m.

 

Joe KonenLeader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

The story of the gene is one of the great mystery narratives of science. In this book, Pulitzer Prize-winning author, Siddhartha Mukherjee, weaves together the history of genetics with his family’s history of mental illness. He looks backward to follow humanity’s growing ability to “read” the human genome from Mendel through Morgan and Hunt to the Human Genome Project. He also looks forward with ethical and human questions about which of the possible experiments with “writing” human genetic code we really want to pursue. Our reading and discussion will help develop our scientific literacy around genetics and will challenge us with the ethical dilemmas raised by recent breakthroughs in genetic modification.

Book: The Gene: An Intimate History, Siddhartha Mukherjee (May 2016)

 

Brecksville United Church of Christ | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

Fridays, March 23-May 11 | 10-11:30 a.m.

 

Jim Van Horn, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

One hundred thousand years ago at least six species inhabited earth. Today, just one. Us. Homo Sapiens. How did our species succeed in the battle for dominance? Create cities and kingdoms?

How did we come to believe in gods, nations, human rights; to trust money, books, laws; and to be enslaved (interesting word, no?) by bureaucracy, timetables, and consumerism? Harari doesn't miss a trick: Cognitive, Agricultural, and Scientific Revolutions. And what will become of us?

Book: Yuval Noah Harari, Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind

 

Judson Park | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

 

 

Tuesdays, April 10–May 1 | 6:30-8:30 p.m.

 

Ezra Blaustein, Instructor of Lifelong Learning, CWRU

 

This course will study the Quran's presentation of characters and stories found in the Hebrew Bible. We will explore the similarities and differences between the tales as they appear in the Quran and as they appear in the Torah. Specifically, we will look at narratives about creation, Abraham, Joseph, and Moses, and discuss the perspectives each text brings to bear on these legends. No prior knowledge of the Torah or of the Quran is necessary for this course.

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: $60; Nonmembers: $75 | REGISTER >