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Siegal Lifelong Learning

Senior Scholars

Senior Scholars

Senior Scholars is an 11-week program that meets three afternoons per week and features academic lectures by university faculty and local experts on a variety of topics. While the format is lecture style, the afternoons are informal and interactive with an opportunity to ask questions and discuss the topics of the day. The Senior Scholars Council, an elected group of volunteers, helps with the program’s administration and participates in planning the classes.

Senior Scholars is supported by a generous gift from the Jane and Jon Outcalt Foundation.

Wednesdays, January 3-24 | 1:30–3:30 p.m.

 

Donald Rosenberg, President of the Music Critics Association of North America; editor of Early Music America Magazine


"Stephen Sondheim, Theater's Greatest Lyricist" said the headline on a recent New York Times story. True, but that's only half of the story. Sondheim has been the American musical theater's greatest composer-lyricist for nearly 60 years. He has pushed the envelope of the musical by stretching his artistic gifts with each new work. 

In this course, we'll explore Sondheim's consummate ability to create mini-dramas through the seamless and insightful melding of music and lyrics.


Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: $60; Nonmembers: $75 | REGISTER >

 

Spring 2018

Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays; January 30-April 19 | 1:30-3:30 p.m.

Tuesdays:
THE WARREN COURT – Part II
In 1954 President Dwight Eisenhower appointed California Governor Earl Warren to be Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. Over the next 16 years the Warren Court would review, interpret and decide cases with far-reaching implications. In this course, we will look at the composition of the court and focus on some of the landmark decisions made from 1961 to 1969.

INSTRUCTOR: Barbara Greenberg, Magistrate, Bedford Municipal Court; Magistrate, Cuyahoga County Juvenile Court Community Diversion Program
Tuesdays, January 30-March 6

BREXIT: WOULD EU BELIEVE IT?
On June 23, 2016, Britain voted to leave the European Union. But why? Britain has had a contentious relationship with the EU since it joined in 1973, but does this explain why it left? Was Brexit an expression of British populism in a year of populist upheavals? Were voters deceived by the post-truth environment in which we seem now to be living? In this course we'll address these questions and more as we examine the consequences of Britain's exit from the EU.

INSTRUCTOR: Luke Reader, SAGES Lecturer, Case Western Reserve University
Tuesdays, March 20-April 17


Wednesdays:
HAMLET: A PRINCE THROUGH CENTURIES
Through a combination of close reading, critical analysis, and research inquiry, the class will navigate a rigorous exploration of what makes The Tragical History of Hamlet Prince of Denmark – a play over four hundred years old – the enduring drama that it is?
In short, we’ll consider Hamlet not only as a literary text but also as a vital dramatic script, one crafted with language and theatrical action to challenge and thrill a socially and economically diverse audience. To this end – in addition to extensive reading – the course will critically examine a number of film adaptations of Shakespeare’s work.

INSTRUCTOR: John Orlock, Samuel B. and Virginia C. Knight Professor of Humanities, Department of English, Case Western Reserve University
Wednesdays, January 31-March 7

POP MUSIC AND CULTURE IN THE 1960s
This course will be a quick and tuneful survey of the music of the 1960s. We’ll look at some of the major trends, figures, and themes to arise in pop music while the Baby Boomers were coming of age, and explore everything from the hysteria of the British Invasion to the tragedy at Altamont.

INSTRUCTOR: Daniel Goldmark, Professor of Music, Case Western Reserve University
Wednesdays, March 21-April 18

 

Thursdays:
AMERICAN LANDSCAPE PAINTING: WILDERNESS, PROGRESS, AND AMERICAN IDENTITY
This course explores the shift from the view of the early 19th century, which saw wilderness as something threatening, which should be destroyed, to the view of the late 19th century, which saw wilderness as something to be protected and something that provided psychological relief from the pressures of modern life.

INSTRUCTOR: Henry Adams, Ruth Coulter Heede Professor of Art History, Case Western Reserve University
Thursdays, February 1-March 8

MEASURING THE WORLD: A HISTORICAL LOOK AT SCIENCE THROUGH THE LENS OF INSTRUMENTS, APPARATUS, AND CLEVER DEVICES
Stories of scientific and technological discovery usually focus on bright ideas and revolutionary new thoughts. This short course will instead explore what makes such intellectual leaps possible in the first place: the tools, measurements, and devices that scientists and engineers have used throughout history to help them understand and control the world around us.

INSTRUCTOR: Alan Rocke, Emeritus Professor of History, Case Western Reserve University
Thursdays, March 22-April 19

No classes March 13, 14, 15 – CWRU Spring Break


 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: $235; Nonmembers: $260 | REGISTER >

 

Tuesdays, January 30-April 17 | 1:30–3:30 p.m.

THE WARREN COURT – Part II
Tuesdays, January 30-March 6
In 1954 President Dwight Eisenhower appointed California Governor Earl Warren to be Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. Over the next 16 years the Warren Court would review, interpret and decide cases with far-reaching implications. In this course, we will look at the composition of the court and focus on some of the landmark decisions made from 1961 to 1969.
INSTRUCTOR: Barbara Greenberg, Magistrate, Bedford Municipal Court; Magistrate, Cuyahoga County Juvenile Court Community Diversion Program

No classes March 13, 14, 15 – CWRU Spring Break

BREXIT: WOULD EU BELIEVE IT?
Tuesdays, March 20-April 17
On June 23, 2016, Britain voted to leave the European Union. But why? Britain has had a contentious relationship with the EU since it joined in 1973, but does this explain why it left? Was Brexit an expression of British populism in a year of populist upheavals? Were voters deceived by the post-truth environment in which we seem now to be living? In this course we'll address these questions and more as we examine the consequences of Britain's exit from the EU.
INSTRUCTOR: Luke Reader, SAGES Lecturer, Case Western Reserve University

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: $115; Nonmembers: $135 | REGISTER >

Wednesdays, January 31-April 18 | 1:30–3:30 p.m.

HAMLET: A PRINCE THROUGH THE CENTURIES
Wednesdays, January 31-March 7
Through a combination of close reading, critical analysis, and research inquiry, the class will navigate a rigorous exploration of what makes The Tragical History of Hamlet Prince of Denmark – a play over four hundred years old – the enduring drama that it is?
In short, we’ll consider Hamlet not only as a literary text but also as a vital dramatic script, one crafted with language and theatrical action to challenge and thrill a socially and economically diverse audience. To this end – in addition to extensive reading – the course will critically examine a number of film adaptations of Shakespeare’s work.
INSTRUCTOR: John Orlock, Samuel B. and Virginia C. Knight Professor of Humanities, Department of English, Case Western Reserve University

No classes March 13, 14, 15 – CWRU Spring Break

POP MUSIC AND CULTURE IN THE 1960's
Wednesdays, March 21-April 18
This course will be a quick and tuneful survey of the music of the 1960s. We’ll look at some of the major trends, figures, and themes to arise in pop music while the Baby Boomers were coming of age, and explore everything from the hysteria of the British Invasion to the tragedy at Altamont.
INSTRUCTOR: Daniel Goldmark, Professor of Music, Case Western Reserve University

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: $115; Nonmembers: $135 | REGISTER >

 

Thursdays, February 1-April 19 | 1:30–3:30 p.m.

AMERICAN LANDSCAPE PAINTING: WILDERNESS, PROGRESS, AND AMERICAN IDENTITY
Thursdays, February 1-March 8
This course explores the shift from the view of the early 19th century, which saw wilderness as something threatening, which should be destroyed, to the view of the late 19th century, which saw wilderness as something to be protected and something that provided psychological relief from the pressures of modern life.
INSTRUCTOR: Henry Adams, Ruth Coulter Heede Professor of Art History, Case Western Reserve University

No classes March 13, 14, 15 – CWRU Spring Break

MEASURING THE WORLD: A HISTORICAL LOOK AT SCIENCE THROUGH THE LENS OF INSTRUMENTS, APPARATUS, AND CLEVER DEVICES
Thursdays, March 22-April 19
Stories of scientific and technological discovery usually focus on bright ideas and revolutionary new thoughts. This short course will instead explore what makes such intellectual leaps possible in the first place: the tools, measurements, and devices that scientists and engineers have used throughout history to help them understand and control the world around us.
INSTRUCTOR: Alan Rocke, Emeritus Professor of History, Case Western Reserve University

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: $115; Nonmembers: $135 | REGISTER >

Mondays, February 26-April 2 | 1:30-3:30 p.m.

 

Dan Riordan, Adjunct Professor of Creative Writing, Cleveland State University

 

This class functions as an introduction to recent American playwrights, focusing on a range of works that have been staged since the mid-1970's to see how these writers have engaged an American audience in terms of subject matter and method.

 

Beck Center for the Arts | Lifelong Learning Members: $72; Nonmembers: $90 | REGISTER >

Senior Scholars at the Beck Center