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Siegal Lifelong Learning

Origins Science Scholars

Origins Science Scholars

The Origins Science Scholars Program is presented by Siegal Lifelong Learning and the Institute for the Science of Origins (ISO), a partnership of several Northeast Ohio research and educational institutions, led by Case Western Reserve University.

In this unique program, members of the community engage with each other and with leading scholars to investigate rapidly developing areas of origins science. Each evening begins with a presentation by a world-class researcher, followed by complimentary dinner and open discussion among all of the participants.

Asteroids

During this unique program, community members engage with one another and with leading scholars to investigate rapidly developing areas of origins science. Each evening begins with a presentation by a world-class researcher, followed by complimentary dinner and open discussion among all the participants.

Program Schedule:
5:30: Coffee and Sign-in
6:00- 7:00: Lectures 
7:00-7:30: Dinner with faculty and fellows 
7:30: Q&A and dessert 
(Parking is included)

Tuesday, April 17 

Isaiah Nengo, Department of Biological Anthropology, Turkana Basin Institute

Early Ape and Human Evolution: Finding Alesi: The Story of a New Infant Ancestor

In 2015, paleoanthropologist Isaiah Nengo's team discovered the 13 million-year-old skull of a baby ape in Turkana. Dubbed Alesi, the new species may be the ancestor of all great apes and humans. Joining forces with physicists, Nengo used unprecedented cutting-edge synchrotron technology to glean new kinds of data never before available for a fossil hominoid specimen. Come hear about this amazing ape and its amazing discovery!

Location: CWRU, Tinkham Veale University Center

Tuesday, April 24

Harsh Mathur, Department of Physics, Case Western Reserve University

Super Conductors and Super Fluids: Extreme Materials

Extreme materials are more and more in the news. We hear about breakthroughs in "superconductors" and now "superfluids." Due to the marvels of quantum mechanics, in a superconductor, resistance drops to zero when the material is cooled below a critical temperature. Superfluids flow with absolutely no viscosity, and so no loss of energy. When stirred, they form vortices that continue to rotate indefinitely. Superfluidity may be a property of other exotic states of matter theorized to exist

Location: Cleveland Museum of Natural History

Tuesday, May 1

Nandini Trivedi, Department of Physics, The Ohio State University

Super Conductors and Super Fluids: The Quantum Dance of Matter: Pairing and Superconductivity

How do electrons and atoms get organized at very low temperatures and how do new phases of matter emerge? Even a very small attraction between electrons in a metal can cause pairs of them to bind together, achieving unusually low energy. These pairs are responsible for superconductivity -and a Nobel Prize in physics! In certain "exotic" cold materials, ultracold atoms can be trapped and organized using light. Rumor has it that Dr. Trivedi will attempt to perform actual experiments for us during the lecture!

Location: CWRU, Tinkham Veale University Center

Tuesday, May 8

Yohannes Haile-Selassie, Curator & Head of Physical Anthropology, Cleveland Museum of Natural History

Early Ape and Human Evolution: New Discoveries from the Cradle of Humankind

Famed paleoanthropologist Yohannes Haile-Selassie is internationally celebrated for his unique ability to understand our primate ancestors. Discoverer of the 4.4 million-year-old species Ardipithecus ramidus, among many other famous specimens, CMNH's curator of physical anthropology continues to make headlines with more and more discoveries from Ethiopia of our evolutionary ancestors. Join us to hear the most up-to-date report of his recent discoveries!

Location: CWRU, Tinkham Veale University Center

Tuesday, May 15

Peter Harte, Department of Genetics, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University

Circadian Rhythm: Discovering the Rhythms of Life

2017's Nobel Prize in Physiology/Medicine was awarded for discovering how fruit flies sleep! Benzer and Konopka demonstrated that mutations in an unknown gene disrupted the circadian clock of flies and named this gene "period." Hall, Rosbash and Young isolated the period gene and discovered that PER, the protein encoded by period, accumulates during the night and degrades during the day, revealing the fascinating way plants, animals and humans adapt their biological "clocks" to be in synchrony with the Earth's revolutions.

Presented in collaboration with CWRU's Emeriti Academy

Location: CWRU, Tinkham Veale University Center

Tuesday, May 22

Fred Turek, Director of the Center for Sleep & Circadian Biology, Charles & Emma Morrison Professor, Northwestern University

Circadian Rhythm: Sleep, Circadian Rhythms, and Your Health

Is sleep a manifestation of the mind or the brain? Genes interact in complex ways to regulate circadian rhythms and these complexities affect our health in unforeseen ways. The neurochemical, molecular, and cellular events involved arise from a central biological clock located in the brain's hypothalamus. When you sleep and wake can regulate the timing of the circadian clock. Advanced age or unusual sleep-wake patterns can interrupt behavioral and endocrine rhythms, leading to central nervous and other diseases -even affect our intestinal microbiota! Come learn how sleep affects your health

Presented in collaboration with CWRU's Emeriti Academy

Location: Cleveland Museum of Natural History

Tuesday, May 29

Kingman Strohl, Chief of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University

Circadian Rhythm: Sleep and the Evolution of Circadian Rhythm

It seems paradoxical that with life as precarious as it is, humans spend a third of their lives out of touch with their surroundings. How could such a thing evolve? Even weirder, a few species have evolved the ability to sleep with one half their brain at a time so the other half remains awake to keep an eye out for predators. Contrary to popular belief, sleep is not over-rated. In fact, it's so important to our physiology that prolonged sleep deprivation results in death. The rotation of the earth on its axis influences the physiology of all organisms, has played a vital role in the evolution of sleep and affects our daily lives in ways we may not suspect!

Location: CWRU, Tinkham Veale University Center

 

Lifelong Learning Members: $195 for full series; $42 per lecture | Nonmembers: $215 for full series; $49 per lecture.

(Friends of the Institute for the Science of Origins are eligible for member rate for this program.)

REGISTER FOR FULL SERIES >

Tuesday, April 17 5:30 p.m.

 

Isaiah Nengo, Department of Biological Anthropology, Turkana Basin Institute

 

In 2015, paleoanthropologist Isaiah Nengo's team discovered the 13 million-year-old skull of a baby ape in Turkana. Dubbed Alesi, the new species may be the ancestor of all great apes and humans. Joining forces with physicists, Nengo used unprecedented cutting-edge synchrotron technology to glean new kinds of data never before available for a fossil hominoid specimen. Come hear about this amazing ape and its amazing discovery!

 

Program Schedule:
5:30 p.m. – Coffee and Sign-In
6 p.m. – Lecture
7 p.m. – Dinner with OSS faculty and fellows
7:30 p.m. – Q&A and Dessert

 

CWRU, Tinkham Veale University Center | Lifelong Learning Members: $42; Nonmembers: $48 | REGISTER >

Tuesday, April 24 | 5:30 p.m.

 

Harsh Mathur, Department of Physics, Case Western Reserve University

 

Extreme materials are more and more in the news. We hear about breakthroughs in "superconductors" and now "superfluids." Due to the marvels of quantum mechanics, in a superconductor, resistance drops to zero when the material is cooled below a critical temperature. Superfluids flow with absolutely no viscosity, and so no loss of energy. When stirred, they form vortices that continue to rotate indefinitely. Superfluidity may be a property of other exotic states of matter theorized to exist.

 

Program Schedule:
5:30 p.m. – Coffee and Sign-In
6 p.m. – Lecture
7 p.m. – Dinner with OSS faculty and fellows
7:30 p.m. – Q&A and Dessert

 

Cleveland Museum of Natural History | Lifelong Learning Members: $42; Nonmembers: $48 | REGISTER >

Tuesday, May 1 | 5:30 p.m.

 

Nandini Trivedi, Department of Physics, The Ohio State University

 

How do electrons and atoms get organized at very low temperatures and how do new phases of matter emerge? Even a very small attraction between electrons in a metal can cause pairs of them to bind together, achieving unusually low energy. These pairs are responsible for superconductivity -and a Nobel Prize in physics! In certain "exotic" cold materials, ultracold atoms can be trapped and organized using light. Rumor has it that Dr. Trivedi will attempt to perform actual experiments for us during the lecture!

 

Program Schedule:
5:30 p.m. – Coffee and Sign-In
6 p.m. – Lecture
7 p.m. – Dinner with OSS faculty and fellows
7:30 p.m. – Q&A and Dessert

 

CWRU, Tinkham Veale University Center | Lifelong Learning Members: $42; Nonmembers: $48 | REGISTER >

Tuesday, May 8 | 5:30 p.m.

 

Yohannes Haile-Selassie, Curator & Head of Physical Anthropology, Cleveland Museum of Natural History

 

Famed paleoanthropologist Yohannes Haile-Selassie is internationally celebrated for his unique ability to understand our primate ancestors. Discoverer of the 4.4 million-year-old species Ardipithecus ramidus, among many other famous specimens, CMNH's curator of physical anthropology continues to make headlines with more and more discoveries from Ethiopia of our evolutionary ancestors. Join us to hear the most up-to-date report of his recent discoveries! 

 

Program Schedule:
5:30 p.m. – Coffee and Sign-In
6 p.m. – Lecture
7 p.m. – Dinner with OSS faculty and fellows
7:30 p.m. – Q&A and Dessert

 

CWRU, Tinkham Veale University Center | Lifelong Learning Members: $42; Nonmembers: $48 | REGISTER >

Tuesday, May 15 | 5:30 p.m.

 

Peter Harte, Department of Genetics, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University 

 

2017's Nobel Prize in Physiology/Medicine was awarded for discovering how fruit flies sleep! Benzer and Konopka demonstrated that mutations in an unknown gene disrupted the circadian clock of flies and named this gene "period." Hall, Rosbash and Young isolated the period gene and discovered that PER, the protein encoded by period, accumulates during the night and degrades during the day, revealing the fascinating way plants, animals and humans adapt their biological "clocks" to be in synchrony with the Earth's revolutions.

 

Program Schedule:
5:30 p.m. – Coffee and Sign-In
6 p.m. – Lecture
7 p.m. – Dinner with OSS faculty and fellows
7:30 p.m. – Q&A and Dessert

 

CWRU, Tinkham Veale University Center | Lifelong Learning Members: $42; Nonmembers: $48 | REGISTER >

Presented in collaboration with the Case Western Reserve University Emeriti Academy, an organization administered through the CWRU Office of the Provost, which is intended to foster closer continuing relationships with emeriti faculty after they retire from full-time employment.

 

Tuesday, May 22 | 5:30 p.m.

 

Fred Turek, Director of the Center for Sleep & Circadian Biology, Charles & Emma Morrison Professor, Northwestern University

 

Is sleep a manifestation of the mind or the brain? Genes interact in complex ways to regulate circadian rhythms and these complexities affect our health in unforeseen ways. The neurochemical, molecular, and cellular events involved arise from a central biological clock located in the brain's hypothalamus. When you sleep and wake can regulate the timing of the circadian clock. Advanced age or unusual sleep-wake patterns can interrupt behavioral and endocrine rhythms, leading to central nervous and other diseases -even affect our intestinal microbiota! Come learn how sleep affects your health!

 

Program Schedule:
5:30 p.m. – Coffee and Sign-In
6 p.m. – Lecture
7 p.m. – Dinner with OSS faculty and fellows
7:30 p.m. – Q&A and Dessert

 

Cleveland Museum of Natural History | Lifelong Learning Members: $42; Nonmembers: $48 | REGISTER >

Presented in collaboration with the Case Western Reserve University Emeriti Academy, an organization administered through the CWRU Office of the Provost, which is intended to foster closer continuing relationships with emeriti faculty after they retire from full-time employment. 

Tuesday, May 29 | 5:30 p.m.

 

Kingman Strohl, Chief of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University 

 

It seems paradoxical that with life as precarious as it is, humans spend a third of their lives out of touch with their surroundings. How could such a thing evolve? Even weirder, a few species have evolved the ability to sleep with one half their brain at a time so the other half remains awake to keep an eye out for predators. Contrary to popular belief, sleep is not over-rated. In fact, it's so important to our physiology that prolonged sleep deprivation results in death. The rotation of the earth on its axis influences the physiology of all organisms, has played a vital role in the evolution of sleep and affects our daily lives in ways we may not suspect!

 

Program Schedule:
5:30 p.m. – Coffee and Sign-In
6 p.m. – Lecture
7 p.m. – Dinner with OSS faculty and fellows
7:30 p.m. – Q&A and Dessert

 

CWRU, Tinkham Veale University Center | Lifelong Learning Members: $42; Nonmembers: $48 | REGISTER > 

Presented in collaboration with the Case Western Reserve University Emeriti Academy, an organization administered through the CWRU Office of the Provost, which is intended to foster closer continuing relationships with emeriti faculty after they retire from full-time employment.