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Sarah Geisler (Graduate Student)

Center for RNA Molecular Biology, Case Western Reserve University, School of Medicine, Wood Bldg.  W113, 10900 Euclid Ave., Cleveland OH 44106-4960, USA

E sarah.geisler@case.edu

P 216.368.0276

F 216.368.2010

Education

Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, August 2001-May 2005 (B.S. in Chemistry and Art History)

Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 2007-current (Ph.D. in Biochemistry, pending)

Professional Experience

Research Assistant, Center for RNA Molecular Biology, Case Western Reserve University, Laboratory of Dr. Saba Valadkhan 2005-2007

Laboratory Assistant, Cystic Fibrosis Research Center, Case Western Reserve University, Laboratory of Dr. Pam Davis, 2001–2002

Honors and Awards

Recipient of the Vance Lemmon Award, presented by Case Western Reserve University at the 2009 Biomedical Graduate Student Symposium

Appointed to Cellular and Molecular Biology Training Grant, 2008 - present, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH

Recipient of the Vance Lemmon Award, presented by Case Western Reserve University at the annual Biomedical Graduate Student Symposium. May 9th, 2008

Dean’s High Honers: Fall 2003 and Spring 2005

Dean’s Honors: Fall 2001, Spring 2003, Spring 2004, and Fall 2004

Provost Scholarship: August 2001 – May 2005

Publications

Valadkhan, Mohammadi, Jaladat, and Geisler (2009). Protein-free small nuclear RNAs catalyze a two-step splicing reaction, PNAS, in press.

Geisler, S. and Coller, J. (2010). Alternate endings - A new story for mRNA decapping. Mol Cell, 40: 349-350

Geisler, S., Lojek, L., Khalil, A., Baker, K.E., and Coller, J., (2012) A decapping pathway for long non-coding RNAs regulates inducible genes. Mol Cell, 45(3): 279-291.

Bio

I RNA. I first got my feet wet in the RNA world working as a lab assistant in the Valadkhan Lab here at Case Western Reserve University. I studied the mechanism of pre-mRNA splicing, and more specifically the catalytic potential of the snRNA components of the spliceosome. While in the Valadkhan Lab I found academic research both stimulating and rewarding, and decided graduate school was the next step in my intellectual development. I have recently embarked on my journey as a graduate student in the Coller Lab, where my project is a matter of life and death. The life and death of messenger RNAs that is. I will be studying the possible interconnectedness of mRNA transcription and turnover.