item2a
TJ1001

Tenure: 2006 - 2012

Current Position: Post-doctoral fellow at Case Western Reserve University

Home1

Thomas (TJ) Sweet (Graduate Student)

Center for RNA Molecular Biology, Case Western Reserve University, School of Medicine, Wood Bldg.  W113, 10900 Euclid Ave., Cleveland OH 44106-4960, USA

E thomas.sweet@case.edu

P 216.368.0276

F 216.368.2010

Education

Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 1998-2002 (B.S. in Biochemistry

Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 2006-current (Ph.D. in Biochemistry, pending)

Professional Experience

Research Assistant, Microbiology/Immunology, 2002-2005 Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine (NEOUCOM), Rootstown, OH

Publications

Hu, W., Sweet, T., Chamnongpol, S., Baker, K.E., and Coller, J. (2009) Co-translational mRNA decay in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Nature, 461:225-229

Sweet, T.J., Boyer, B., Hu, W., Baker, K.E., and Coller, J. (2007) Microtubule disruption stimulates P-body formation. RNA, 13:1-10

Docherty, J. J., Sweet, T. J., Bailey, E., Faith, S. A., and Booth, T. (2006). Resveratrol inhibition of varicella-zoster virus replication in vitro. Antiviral Res. 72, 171-177.

Faith, S. A., Sweet, T. J., Bailey, E., Booth, T., and Docherty, J. J. (2006). Resveratrol suppresses nuclear factor-kappaB in herpes simplex virus infected cells. Antiviral Res. 72, 242-251.

Docherty, J. J., Fu, M. M., Hah, J. M., Sweet, T. J., Faith, S. A., and Booth, T. (2005). Effect of resveratrol on herpes simplex virus vaginal infection in the mouse. Antiviral Res 67, 155-162.

Honors and Awards

Awarded the Marcus Singer Award at the 2009 Biomedical Graduate Student Symposium

Appointed to Cellular and Molecular Biology Training Grant, 2006 - 2008, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH

Bio

I am fairly new to RNA research, and my path into the study of RNA was quite discontinuous.  After earning a bachelor's degree in biochemistry from Case Western Reserve University in 2002, I was not sure whether medical school or graduate school was the right path for me.  I then served as a research technician in the lab of John Docherty at Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine (Rootstown, OH) from 2002 to 2005. Research in the Docherty lab centered on anti-herpes simplex virus (HSV) agents.  This HSV research served not only to define potentially novel drugs, but also helped me decide on research as a career.  In the summer of 2005, I joined the University of Pittsburgh as a graduate student.  In January 2006, I transferred back to Case Western to continue work on my PhD.  In the course of performing lab rotations, I worked in Jeff Coller's lab in the RNA Center for Molecular Biology.  Jeff's lab struck a particular chord with me because of the lab's focus on post-transcriptional control of gene expression.  In my previous studies, I had learned much about transcriptional control of gene expression.  Little attention has been given to post-transcriptional control of gene expression until recently.  Since current research points to post-transcriptional control of gene expression being at least as important as transcriptional control, I feel that my work as a graduate student in Jeff's lab is venturing into largely unexplored, exciting territory.