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Social Justice Institute

Upcoming Events

Upcoming Events

The Social Justice Institute presents meaningful events where students, scholars and community members gather together to tap into our individual and collective psyches and souls, hearts and minds, knowledge and networks of support, and dare to draw forth the words, analyses, strategies and actions that respect and uplift human dignity and life.  We are honored to provide distinctive educational opportunities  – and we invite you to join us and become partners in our work. 

Decolonizing Cleveland Charette

Co-sponsored by the Beamer-Schneider Lecture in Ethics and Civics

  • Date and Time: Saturday, October 14, 10:30 am-2 pm
  • Location: Clark Hall, Room 309, 11130 Bellflower Road 

Indigenous movements such as the Dakota Access Pipeline often call for “decolonization” as a goal of social justice advocacy. What does decolonization mean? What are the different forms decolonization could take locally? The greater Cleveland area may assume its history to start with the formation of the U.S. and European colonization of North America. But the area is also home to a much longer history of diverse Indigenous peoples. In fact, this area has been known by many names. Moreover, more recently, Indigenous persons and communities make their home in the Cleveland area, bringing both traditions from this region and from many other regions in North America, and also beyond. In the last 200 years, additional groups, including African-Americans, have created homes, communities and cultures in the area. But the current infrastructure, maps, buildings, artwork, and other markers of the physical landscape in the Cleveland area do not appear to include or honor these connections to Indigenous peoples and other groups. In fact, in some respect, the physical landscape and urban/suburban ecology reflect U.S. desires to take the land from other groups and erase their histories and contemporary lives. What would it mean, then, to change this situation? This event, open to the Cleveland community and CWRU, will be an open discussion of whether decolonization has a place in the Cleveland area, what decolonization might look like, and how it might be achieved.

At this participatory event, Kyle Powys Whyte, several elders from the Cleveland indigenous community, and an SJI representative will lead us in an envisioning process to imagine what it would be to decolonize Cleveland.  This process is meant as an introduction and as something incomplete — a kind of proposition, even a preposition.  Lunch will be served.  RSVPs requested.  

 

Lunch with SJI - Learn about the Social Justice Minor

  • Date and Time: Friday, October 27, 12:45-2 pm
  • Location: Mather House, Room 100 

Join SJI Academic Coordinator John Flores for an informal lunch and conversation about SJI and the social justice minor.  Bring your questions or just come to connect with other like-minded students interested in justice and activism.  RSVP to lbk24@case.edu.

 

Race, Equity and Inclusion: How Cleveland Generates Wealth

Research Lunch Series with Kevin Alin and Peter Truog

  • Date and Time: Tuesday, November 7, 11:30 am-12:45 pm
  • Location: Crawford Hall, Room A13, 10900 Euclid Ave 

What happens when a community comes together to unpack the history of structural racism and how it manifests locally? In 2017, Cleveland Neighborhood Progress, the Fund for Our Economic Future, and other engaged partners funded a learning journey to increase shared understanding of racial inequality in Northeast Ohio and foster productive dialogue among stakeholders. Through that journey, The Fund for Our Economic Future has produced an analysis looking at how wealth is generated annually in the Cleveland MSA through a racial equity and inclusion lens. A discussion of this analysis and the questions that it provokes will be the focus on this presentation.

The Research Lunch Series is free and open to the community.  Bring a lunch; drinks and dessert provided.  RSVPS requested to lbk24@case.edu.

 

Think Tank 2017

Educating for Struggle: State Violence, Then and Now

  • Date and Time: November 16-18
  • Location: Tinkham-Veale University Center, 11038 Bellflower Road

Featuring Keynote Addresses by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz and Ibram Kendi.  

Registration is now open!

Sponsored by the CWRU Office for Inclusion, Diversity & Equal Opportunity, the President's Advisory Council on Minorities, ideastream, Ndeda N. Letson, the Beamer-Schneider Professorship in Ethics and the CWRU School of Law.

 

Who's Afraid of Edward Said?  The Palestinians and the Stifling of Dissent

Research Lunch Series with Ted Steinberg

  • Date and Time: Tuesday, December 5, 11:30 am-12:45 pm
  • Location: Crawford Hall, Room A13, 10900 Euclid Ave 

Steinberg writes: "Growing up in the sixties and seventies, I don’t recall hearing anything about Palestinians. It was always Arabs. Golda Meir herself had said that the Palestinian people 'did not exist.' My personal journey with respect to this contentious issue, and an update on the serious threats to dissent now present and brewing in the United States—and on our campus."

The Research Lunch Series is free and open to the community.  Bring a lunch; drinks and dessert provided.  RSVPS requested to lbk24@case.edu.

 

Medical Deportation: The New Form of Patient Dumping

Research Lunch Series with Sana Loue

  • Date and Time: Tuesday, January 23, 11:30 am-12:45 pm
  • Location: Crawford Hall, Room A13, 10900 Euclid Ave 

Medical deportation refers to the involuntary removal of documented and undocumented immigrants with long term health care needs and little or no health insurance coverage from a US hospital to a facility in their country of origin.  Often, the medical facilities that exist in the immigrant’s country of origin to which individuals are sent lack adequate equipment and/or skill to provide the requisite care. Research suggests that hospitals are increasingly utilizing this practice to address inadequate funding for emergency and long term medical care costs.  Some hospitals have attempted to have a US citizen patient removed to the country of a parent’s origin in an effort to reduce their costs. Hospitals have often been successful in their attempts to obtain a state court order permitting such medical deportations. Various commentators have suggested that the practice of medical deportation represents a form of patient dumping across international borders, and constitutes a violation of both US and international law. This presentation explores the ethical and legal issues confronting health care providers in such situations, as well as the obligations of local governments and organizations to provide care for immigrants with health needs

The Research Lunch Series is free and open to the community.  Bring a lunch; drinks and dessert provided.  RSVPS requested to lbk24@case.edu.

 

2018 Social Justice Teach In

Presented with the Center for Civic Engagement & Learning and the Interreligious Task Force on Central America

  • Date and Time: Saturday, February 10
  • Location: Tinkham Veale University Center, 11038 Bellflower Road 

Join hundreds of students and community members for an illuminating and meaningful opportunity to learn about the social justice issues that concern you.  Following a powerful keynote address by Amanda King and the youth of Shooting Without Bullets, participants will select workshops from dozens being offered. The event is free for students and $10 for community members.  Registration requested. 

 

Forced Labor and Maritime Art: Finding Slaves in Seventeenth-Century France

Research Lunch Series with Gillian Weiss

  • Date and Time: Tuesday, February 13, 11:30 am-12:45 pm
  • Location: Crawford Hall, Room A13, 10900 Euclid Ave 

Historians long assumed that after the medieval period, slavery vanished from metropolitan France and re-emerged only in its American colonies. In fact, thousands of enslaved Muslims and convicts labored for King Louis XIV (r. 1643-1715). Besides rowing his Mediterranean galleys, these servile oarsmen helped build and decorate naval vessels and other artworks that proclaimed royal supremacy. In her collaborative book project (with NYU art historian Meredith Martin), historian Gillian Weiss explores the role of forced labor in maritime art produced and displayed in seventeenth-century France. Her talk will consider how revealing the historical presence of Muslims and the persistence of slavery reverberates in current debates about Islam, immigration, integration and citizenship.

The Research Lunch Series is free and open to the community.  Bring a lunch; drinks and dessert provided.  RSVPS requested to lbk24@case.edu.

 

U.N. World Social Justice Day

An Annual Event Commemorating U.N. World Social Justice Day

  • Date and Time: Tuesday, February 20
  • Location: Tinkham Veale University Center, 11038 Bellflower Road 

Details of this special event will be announced shortly.

 

Connecting the Dots: CWRU Campus Activism in the 1960s

Research Lunch Series with Eva Barrett and Tim Black

  • Date and Time: Tuesday, March 20, 11:30 am-12:45 pm
  • Location: Crawford Hall, Room A13, 10900 Euclid Ave 

Campus activism was vibrant before and after the CWRU merger. Based on archival research, this talk will describe campus activism from 1965-1972, identifying student groups and events, and connecting them to regional and national issues. 

The Research Lunch Series is free and open to the community.  Bring a lunch; drinks and dessert provided.  RSVPS requested to lbk24@case.edu.

 

No Más Bebés: Film & Conversation with Producer/Researcher Virginia Espino

Presented with the Flora Stone Mather Center for Women and the Office of Multicultural Affairs

  • Date and Time: Wednesday, March 21, 6-8:30 pm
  • Location: Tinkham Veale University Center, 11038 Bellflower Rd. 

They came to have their babies.  They went home sterilized.  So begins the incredibly moving tales of the women chronicled in No Más Bebés (No More Babies), a heartbreaking documentary film based on the research of Latinx historian Virginia Espino.  This is the story of Mexican immigrant mothers who sued Los Angeles county doctors, the state and the federal government after they were sterilized while giving birth in the 1970s.  Led by an intrepid young Chicana lawyer, the mothers faced public exposure and stood up to powerful institutions in the name of justice.  A discussion with Espino will follow the film.  Light refreshments provided.

 

The Babes Were Silent: Infant Mortality and Public Health

CONVERSATIONS! at the Dittrick Museum

  • Date and Time: Thursday, March 29, 6 pm
  • Location: Clark Hall, Room 206, 11130 Bellflower Road

Co-sponsored by the Dittrick and the CWRU Social Justice Institute, this event will be part of the Cleveland Humanities Festival. Join us for a short-lecture, panel discussion, and public round-table about  public health history, industrialization, housing, and the ways race and class combine to produce an ongoing crisis for our community.

Brandy Schillace, PhD, Senior research associate at the Dittrick Museum, will give a short TED-style talk on the rapid industrialization and immigration boom of the early 20th century in Cleveland. She will take a look at how a stressed water and sewage system, poor housing, and the exploitation of the poorest workers with the least social mobility led to outbreaks of cholera, rampant lead poisoning, and high rates of infant mortality in urban centers. The geography of these neighborhoods still matters, and Cleveland still faces high infant mortality rates. The historical presentation will end with a panel discussion about problems of race, class, and health today. The presentation will end with a public roundtable and Q and A.  

 

Lunch with SJI - Learn about the Social Justice Minor

  • Date and Time: Friday, April 6, 12:45-2 pm
  • Location: TBD 

Join SJI Academic Coordinator John Flores for an informal lunch and conversation about SJI and the social justice minor.  Bring your questions or just come to connect with other like-minded students interested in justice and activism.  RSVP to lbk24@case.edu.

 

Race, Food and Justice: Examining the Urban Food Movement through a Social Justice Lens

Presented with Environmental Health Watch and Rid-All Green Partnership

  • Date and Time: April 2018
  • Location: CWRU Campus 

Stay tuned for details about the conference events, speakers and workshops!

 

Social Justice Institute Fellows Present...

Research Lunch Series with Janet McGrath and Andrew Rollins, Frank Manzella and Megan Schmidt-Sane

  • Date and Time: Tuesday, April 17, 11:30 am-12:45 pm
  • Location: Crawford Hall, Room A13, 10900 Euclid Ave 

Anthropology-Engineering Collaborative: Designing Interdisciplinary Solutions to Global Health Problems

Janet McGrath (professor of anthropology) and Andrew Rollins (professor of biomedical engineering and medicine) will present the results of their collaboration that trains social science and engineering students at CWRU and Makerere University, Uganda in a collaborative design process involving community based participatory action research (PAR) andbiodesign to develop solutions to locally identified technology for health needs in Luwero district, Uganda.

(Dis)Embodied Experiences of Medical Tourism in Urban Brazil

Drawing on the results of a one-year ethnographic study on the medical tourism industry in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Frank Manzella (graduate student in anthropology) will focus on the social justice dimensions that encourage foreign patients to seek healthcare in another country.  Additionally, conflicts encountered by patients throughout the many phases of the medical tourism process will be described.

"We lost many of our friends": Economic scarcity, social resilience, and HIV vulnerability in Kampala, Uganda

The research of Megan Schmidt-Sane (graduate student in medical anthropology) employs a broader framing of risk in the patterning of HIV vulnerability and social resilience among men in Kampala, Uganda who live and work in communities deemed “high-risk” due to the presence of sex work. This study draws on core principles in social justice to confront the complexity and fragility that punctuates life at the margins.

The Research Lunch Series is free and open to the community.  Bring a lunch; drinks and dessert provided.  RSVPS requested to lbk24@case.edu.

 


STAY TUNED FOR ANNOUNCEMENTS OF ADDITIONAL 2017-2018 EVENTS.
 

 

 

About Our Events

The majority of our events are free of charge and open to the community.  We cannot do this important work without you – we hope that you will consider supporting us in these endeavors.  Gifts of any size will impact our work and support our signature programs.  Donations may be made online or sent to Social Justice Institute, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH 44106-7243.

To RSVP or volunteer for any upcoming event, please call 216.368.7568 or email socialjustice@case.edu.