Office of Undergraduate Studies

College of Arts and Sciences

Bachelor of Arts Degree

Candidates for the Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree, in addition to meeting the general requirements for bachelor’s degrees, must also complete the following requirements:

  1. A minimum of 120 semester hours earned.
  2. No more than 42 hours beyond the 100-level in any one department may be applied to the 120 hour total.
  3. At least 90 semester hours in arts and sciences. These credits may be drawn from those offered by the College of Arts and Sciences, as well as those in economics, biochemistry, nutrition and computer science. (Students completing both a BA and BS degree are exempted from six hours of the 90 hour arts and sciences requirement for the BA.)
  4. A minimum of 30 semester hours of courses at the 300-400 level.
  5. The SAGES General Education Requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.
  6. The requirements for a major as specified in this bulletin for each department or program. A major requires a minimum of 30 semester hours, at least 24 of which are taken in the major department or program. For all courses taken in the major department and for which grades are averaged, and for all courses taken to satisfy major requirements and for which grades are averaged, a BA candidate must earn a minimum cumulative average of 2.000. Major requirements include all required and elective work completed in the major department combined with required courses completed in related fields. Transfer students must complete at Case Western Reserve University at least half the hours required in the major department.
Major Concentrations Available for the Bachelor of Arts degree:
  • American Studies*
  • Anthropology
  • Art History
  • Asian Studies
  • Astronomy
  • Biochemistry
  • Biology
  • Chemical Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Classics
  • Cognitive Science
  • Communication Sciences
  • Computer Science
  • Dance
  • Dean's Approved Major**
  • Economics
  • English
  • Environmental Geology
  • Environmental Studies*
  • Evolutionary Biology*
  • French
  • French and Francophone Studies
  • Geological Sciences
  • German
  • German Studies
  • Gerontological Studies*
  • History
  • History and Philosophy of Science
  • International Studies
  • Japanese Studies
  • Mathematics
  • Music
  • Natural Sciences*
  • Nutrition
  • Nutritional Biochemistry and Metabolism
  • Philosophy
  • Physics
  • Political Science
  • Pre-Architecture*
  • Psychology
  • Religious Studies
  • Sociology
  • Spanish
  • Statistics
  • Teacher Education*
  • Theater Arts
  • Women’s and Gender Studies
  • World Literature
Footnotes
*  May be taken only as a second major.
** Any student interested in developing for the BA a major of his or her own design may submit, before the end of the sophomore year, a program proposal for a Dean's Approved Major to the Office of Undergraduate Studies for approval by the Dean’s Committee

Bachelor of Science Degree

Candidates for the Bachelor of Science degrees, in addition to meeting the general requirements for bachelor’s degrees, must also complete the following requirements:

  1. A minimum of 120-133 hours as specified by the requirements for each BS program.
  2. A minimum of 30 semester hours of courses at the 300-400 level.
  3. The SAGES General Education Requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences. For some BS programs, the SAGES General Education Requirements of the Arts and Sciences have been modified and incorporated into the degree requirements as presented in this bulletin in the section devoted to each department or program.
  4. The requirements for a major field as presented in this bulletin in the section devoted to each department or program. For all courses taken in the major department and for which grades are averaged, and for all courses taken to satisfy major requirements and for which grades are averaged, a candidate for a BS from the College of Arts and Sciences must earn a minimum cumulative average of 2.000. Major requirements include all required and elective work completed in the major department combined with required courses completed in related fields. Transfer students must complete at Case Western Reserve University at least half the hours required for the major.
Major Concentrations for the Bachelor of Science degree:
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Art Education
  • Astronomy
  • Biochemistry
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Geological Sciences
  • Mathematics
  • Mathematics and Physics
  • Music Education
  • Nutrition
  • Nutritional Biochemistry and Metabolism
  • Physics
  • Statistics
  • Systems Biology

SAGES General Education Requirements

SAGES is an innovative undergraduate experience designed to establish foundations for academic inquiry. Students fulfill their College of Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements with a sequence of specially developed seminars and selected courses. Course credit earned by Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, proficiency examinations, and transfer may be used to satisfy general education requirements.

SAGES Program Seminars

The First Seminar

(4 semester hours, to be taken in the first semester of enrollment)

The First Seminar focuses on the development of critical thinking and communication skills through the use of a variety of approaches, media, and perspectives to explore the human mind and the nature of inquiry. This course is designed to strengthen writing and analytical skills while building a foundation in ethics, information literacy, and cultural diversity. Select from:

  • First Seminar: Natural World (FSNA 1xx)
  • First Seminar: Social World (FSSO 1xx)
  • First Seminar: Symbolic World (FSSY 1xx)

Based on test scores and a writing sample, some students will be placed in , designed to provide additional writing support.  Most students for whom English is a second language will continue their First Seminar experience in a second semester by enrolling in and completing FSCS 150 First Seminar Continuing Semester.

Transfer Students only: Transfer students who have completed the English composition/expository writing requirement with a grade of C or higher at the college/university at which they previously matriculated will receive transfer credit for FSCC 100-TR (3 - 6 semester hours) and will be required to complete a supplemental 1-semester-hour SAGES introductory seminar - FSTS 100 SAGES Transfer Supplement.

University Seminars

(6 semester hours, minimum of two seminars, to be completed in the first two years of enrollment as specified below)

After completion of the First Seminar with a passing evaluative grade, students must complete two University Seminars.  A student's First Seminar and two University Seminars must include a course from each of the three thematic areas: Natural World, Social World, and Symbolic World.  University Seminars provide continued experience in critical reading, writing, and oral communication, as well as information literacy, ethics, and cultural diversity.  Each University Seminar explores content determined according to the interests of the faculty. University Seminars must be completed by the end of the fourth semester of enrollment. Select from:

  • University Seminar: Thinking About the Natural World (USNA 2xx)
  • University Seminar: Thinking About the Social World (USSO 2xx)
  • University Seminar: Thinking About the Symbolic World (USSY 2xx)

Students who complete their First Seminar requirement with FSCC 100, FSCS 150, or FSTS 100 may fulfill their University Seminar requirement by choosing courses from any two of the three thematic areas.

University Composition Requirement

Students develop a Writing Portfolio comprised of final graded writing assignments from the First Seminar and University Seminars. The Writing Portfolio is due the semester after completing the final University seminar.  Writing competence must be established in order to fulfill the University's English Composition requirement for graduation.

Department Seminar

(3 semester hours)

The Department Seminar includes seminar-based discussion as well as instruction and experience in the kinds of writing characteristic of the Department Seminar's discipline. The Department Seminar may be taken in the department of the student's major or in another department. A course used to fulfill the Department Seminar Requirement may not also be used to fulfill a Breadth Requirement.  It is taken after the completion of the University Seminars, ordinarily in the fourth - sixth semester of study.  Courses meeting this requirement include the designation "Approved SAGES Department" in their course descriptions. Some majors include a specific Department Seminar as part of their requirements.

Senior Capstone

(3 - 6 semester hours)

The Senior Capstone assimilates the knowledge and skills gained throughout the educational process. Students engage in a unique one- or two-semester experience designed in consultation with a faculty member. Each Senior Capstone must include key elements:

  1. Demonstration of critical thinking and writing skills;
  2. Regular oversight by the Capstone advisor;
  3. Periodic reporting of progress;
  4. Regular writing (e.g. drafts, progress reports, critiques) throughout the project including a final written report which may be a thesis or equivalent document associated with the project or activity (e.g., such pursuits as performance, experiment, live case analysis, or creative writing), as approved by the department of capstone origin; and
  5. Oral reports including a final public presentation at the Senior Capstone Fair, a conference, a performance, a public lecture, a teaching presentation, or another setting, as approved by the department of capstone origin.

Courses meeting this requirement include the designation "Approved SAGES Capstone" in their course descriptions. Some majors include a specific a Senior Capstone course as part of their requirements.

Physical Education

(Must total 2 full semesters at zero credits)

Students choose from half- and full-semester course offerings.  If possible, a student should begin meeting this requirement in the first semester and complete it early in his or her undergraduate years.

Breadth Requirements

(18 semester hours – minimum of six 3- or 4-semester hour courses)

NOTE: Two courses used to fulfill requirements for the major may be used also to fulfill the breadth requirements.

Arts and Humanities

(6 - 8 semester hours)

Two 3- or 4-semester hour Arts and Humanities courses. Select from:

  • Arabic (ARAB)
  • Art History (ARTH)
  • Art Studio (ARTS)
  • Chinese (CHIN)
  • Classics (CLSC)
  • Dance (DANC)
  • English (ENGL)
  • French (FRCH)
  • German (GRMN)
  • Greek (GREK)
  • Hebrew (HBRW)
  • History (HSTY)
  • Italian (ITAL)
  • Japanese (JAPN)
  • Latin (LATN)
  • Music - General (MUGN)
  • Music - History (MUHI)
  • Music- Popular (MUPM)
  • Music - Theory (MUTH)
  • Philosophy (PHIL)
  • Portuguese (PORT)
  • Religious Studies (RLGN)
  • Russian (RUSN)
  • Spanish (SPAN)
  • Theater (THTR)
  • World Literature (WLIT)

Natural and Mathematical Sciences

(6 - 8 semester hours)

Two 3- or 4-semester hour Natural and Mathematical Science courses. Select from:

  • Astronomy (ASTR)
  • Biochemistry (BIOC)
  • Biology (BIOL)
  • Chemistry (CHEM)
  • Earth, Environmental and Planetary Sciences (EEPS)
  • Mathematics (MATH)
  • Nutrition (NTRN)
  • Physics (PHYS)
  • Statistics (STAT)

Social Sciences

(6 semester hours)

Two 3-semester hour Social Science courses. Select from:

  • Anthropology (ANTH)
  • Cognitive Science (COGS)
  • Communication Sciences (COSI)
  • Economics (ECON)
  • Political Science (POSC)
  • Psychology (PSCL)
  • Sociology (SOCI)

Quantitative Reasoning

(3 - 4 semester hours)

Each student must complete at least one 3- or 4-semester hour course identified as a mathematical reasoning course. Such a course may also be used to fulfill a major or minor requirement, and/or one of the breadth requirements. Select from:

ANTH 319 Introduction to Statistical Analysis in the Social Sciences 3
EECS 132 Introduction to Programming in Java 3
ENGR 131 Elementary Computer Programming 3
MATH 121 Calculus for Science and Engineering I 4
MATH 125 Math and Calculus Applications for Life, Managerial, and Social Sci I 4
MATH 150 Mathematics from a Mathematician's Perspective 3
PHIL 201 Introduction to Logic 3
PSCL 282 Quantitative Methods in Psychology 3
STAT 201 Basic Statistics for Social and Life Sciences 3

Global and Cultural Diversity

(3 - 4 semester hours)

Each student must complete at least one 3- or 4-semester hour course identified as a global and cultural diversity course. Such a course may also be used to fulfill a major requirement and/or one of the breadth requirements. Students who matriculate as undergraduate degree candidates in August 2012 or later must select a course from the list below; students who matriculated at as degree candidates prior to August 2012 can find the list of options from which they may choose on their academic requirements report.

AMST 117 Exploring American History Through Biography 3
ANTH 233 Introduction to Jewish Folklore 3
ANTH 312 Ethnography of Southeast Asia 3
ANTH 349 Cultures of Latin America 3
ANTH 353 Chinese Culture and Society 3
ARAB 337 Women in the Arab World 3
ARTH 101 Art History I: Pyramids to Pagodas 3
ARTH 102 Art History II: Michelangelo to Maya Lin 3
ARTH 220 Jewish Traditional Art and Architecture 3
ARTH 241 Medieval Art 3
ARTH 249 The Global Middle Ages: From Paris to Baghdad 3
ARTH 260 Art in Early Modern Europe 3
ARTH 301 Museums and Globalization 3
ARTH 349 Gothic Art: Vision and Matter 3
ARTH 358 Medieval Body 3
ARTH 359 Visual Culture of Medieval Women 3
ARTH 360 Renaissance Art in Northern Europe 3
ARTH 361 17th-Century Art in Belgium and The Netherlands 3
ARTH 367 17th and 18th Century Art in France 3
ARTH 383 Gender Issues in Feminist Art: The 20th/21st Century 3
ASIA 288 Imperial China: The Great Qing 3
ASIA 289 History of Twentieth Century China 3
BETH 315A International Bioethics Policy and Practice: Women's Health in the Netherlands 3
BETH 315B International Bioethics Policy and Practice: Public Health in the Netherlands 3
BETH 315C International Bioethics Policy and Practice: Health Care Costa Rica 3
BETH 315D International Bioethics Policy and Practice: Issues at the Beginning and End of Life in France 3
BETH 315E International Bioethics: Policy and Practice--US and Spanish Perspectives, Salamanca Spain 3
CLSC 206 Ancient and Medieval Spain: Prehistory to 1492 3
CLSC 210 Byzantine World 300-1453 3
COGS 317 Cognitive Diversity 3
DANC 121 Dance in Culture - Ethnic Forms 3
ENGL 270 Introduction to Gender Studies 3
ENGL 343 Language and Gender 3
ENGL 363H African-American Literature 3
ENGL 365E The Immigrant Experience 3
ENGL 365N Topics in African-American Literature 3
ENGL 365Q Post-Colonial Literature 3
ENGL 366G Minority Literatures 3
ENGL 371 Topics in Women's and Gender Studies 3
ETHS 218 Jews in Early Modern Europe 3
ETHS 220 The Early Modern Mediterranean 3
ETHS 232 DESI: Diaspora, Ethnicity, Southasia(n), Interrogate 3
ETHS 234 France and Islam 3
ETHS 252A Introduction to African-American Studies 3
ETHS 252B Introduction to Latina/o Studies 3
ETHS 253A Introduction to Modern African History 3
ETHS 253B Introduction to Latin American History 3
ETHS 254 The Holocaust 3
ETHS 260 U.S. Slavery and Emancipation 3
ETHS 261 African-American History 1865-1945 3
ETHS 262 African-American History Since 1945 3
ETHS 280 History of Modern Mexico 3
ETHS 287 State, War, Drugs, and Coffee in Colombia: History of Modern Colombia 3
ETHS 304 Representations of Black Women and Religion in Film 3
ETHS 316 African Political Thought 3
ETHS 325 Hispanic Intellectuals and Society: A Critical Approach 3
ETHS 333 Contemporary Caribbean Literature 3
ETHS 336 The Struggle for Justice in Latin America 3
ETHS 337 Women in the Arab World 3
ETHS 339 Black Women and Religion 3
ETHS 340 A History of Workers in the United States 3
ETHS 343 The New Drama in Latin American 3
ETHS 356 Afro-Hispanic Literature 3
ETHS 358 Latin American Cinema 3
ETHS 362 Politics of Central Asia 3
ETHS 363H African-American Literature 3
ETHS 364 Dictatorship and Democracy in Modern Latin America 3
ETHS 365Q Post-Colonial Literature 3
ETHS 369 Current Controversies in Latin American Politics and Society 3
ETHS 393 Advanced Readings in the History of Race 3
FRCH 337 Women in the Arab World 3
HSTY 113 Introduction to Modern World History 3
HSTY 117 Exploring American History Through Biography 3
HSTY 135 Introduction to Modern African History 3
HSTY 136 Introduction to Latin American History 3
HSTY 163 Modern Britain and Its Empire 3
HSTY 206 Ancient and Medieval Spain: Prehistory to 1492 3
HSTY 210 Byzantine World 300-1453 3
HSTY 211 The Medieval World, 300-1500 3
HSTY 215 Europe in the 20th Century 3
HSTY 216 Vikings and Medieval Scandinavia 3
HSTY 218 Jews in Early Modern Europe 3
HSTY 220 The Early Modern Mediterranean 3
HSTY 224 Early Modern Europe 3
HSTY 232 Roman Civilization 3
HSTY 234 France and Islam 3
HSTY 235 Pirates in the Early Modern World 3
HSTY 241 Inventing Public Health 3
HSTY 246 People and the Land in Pre-Modern Europe 3
HSTY 249 The Global Middle Ages: From Paris to Baghdad 3
HSTY 252A Introduction to African-American Studies 3
HSTY 254 The Holocaust 3
HSTY 257 Immigrants in America 3
HSTY 259 Introduction to Latina/o Studies 3
HSTY 260 U.S. Slavery and Emancipation 3
HSTY 261 African-American History 1865-1945 3
HSTY 262 African-American History Since 1945 3
HSTY 266 Introduction to Asian American History 3
HSTY 270 Introduction to Gender Studies 3
HSTY 272 Sports in America: From Play to Profit 3
HSTY 278 Nineteenth-Century Europe 3
HSTY 280 History of Modern Mexico 3
HSTY 285 Modern Japan 3
HSTY 287 State, War, Drugs, and Coffee in Colombia: History of Modern Colombia 3
HSTY 288 Imperial China: The Great Qing 3
HSTY 289 History of Twentieth Century China 3
HSTY 303 History of the Early Church: First Through Fourth Centuries 3
HSTY 309 Reformation Europe, 1500-1650 3
HSTY 315 Heresy and Dissidence in the Middle Ages 3
HSTY 319 The Crusades 3
HSTY 327 Comparative Environmental History 3
HSTY 328 Comparative Perspectives on Museum and Archive History and Practice 3
HSTY 329 Museums and Globalization 3
HSTY 332 European International Relations 1789-1945 3
HSTY 333 Reading Capital: Political Economy in the Age of Modern Industry 3
HSTY 334 History of 19th Century Germany 3
HSTY 335 History of 20th Century Germany 3
HSTY 336 The Struggle for Justice in Latin America 3
HSTY 338 History of the American West 3
HSTY 339 The Origins of the Arab-Israeli Conflict, 1900-1948 3
HSTY 340 A History of Workers in the United States 3
HSTY 341 Jewish Urban History 3
HSTY 342 Water 3
HSTY 345 The European City 3
HSTY 346 Guns, Germs, and Steel 3
HSTY 353 Women in American History I 3
HSTY 354 Women in American History II 3
HSTY 363 Gender and Sexuality in America 3
HSTY 371 Jews under Islam and Christianity 3
HSTY 375 Advance Readings in Latin American History 3
HSTY 381 City as Classroom 3
HSTY 383 Readings in PRC History 3
HSTY 385 Readings in Society and Culture in Modern Chinese History 3
HSTY 387 Growing Up in America: 1607 - 2000 3
HSTY 389 History of Zionism 3
HSTY 393 Advanced Readings in the History of Race 3
JDST 208 Introduction to Western Religions 3
JDST 218 Jews in Early Modern Europe 3
JDST 220 Jewish Traditional Art and Architecture 3
JDST 228 The Jewish Image in Popular Film 3
JDST 233 Introduction to Jewish Folklore 3
JDST 254 The Holocaust 3
JDST 341 Jewish Urban History 3
JDST 371 Jews under Islam and Christianity 3
JDST 389 History of Zionism 3
MUED 305 World Music in Education 3
MUHI 310 Music Cultures of the World: Music of Asia and Africa 3
MUHI 311 Music Cultures of the World II: Music of the Americas 3
MUHI 313 American Popular Song to 1950 3
MUHI 315 History of Jazz and American Popular Music 3
MUHI 320 Global Pop 3
MUPM 212 History of Rock and Roll 3
MUPM 215 History and Styles of Jazz 3
PHIL 221 Indian Philosophy 3
PHIL 270 Introduction to Gender Studies 3
PHIL 316 African Political Thought 3
PHIL 325 Philosophy of Feminism 3
PHIL 356 Comparative Philosophy 3
POSC 160 Introduction to Comparative Politics 3
POSC 326 Constitutions in Practical Politics 3
POSC 342 Water 3
POSC 361 State-Building and State Collapse 3
POSC 362 Politics of Central Asia 3
POSC 364 Dictatorship and Democracy in Modern Latin America 3
POSC 369 Current Controversies in Latin American Politics and Society 3
POSC 370D The Politics of China 3
POSC 370H China's Foreign Policy 3
POSC 377 Politics of Russia 3
POSC 379 Introduction to Middle East Politics 3
POSC 381 City as Classroom 3
RLGN 102 Introduction to the Study of Religion 3
RLGN 108 The History of Yoga: The Yoga of Transformation and the Transformation of Yoga 3
RLGN 208 Introduction to Western Religions 3
RLGN 214 Introduction to Islam 3
RLGN 221 Indian Philosophy 3
RLGN 223 Religious Roots of Conflict in the Middle East 3
RLGN 232 DESI: Diaspora, Ethnicity, Southasia(n), Interrogate 3
RLGN 238 Alternative Altars: Folk Religion in America 3
RLGN 254 The Holocaust 3
RLGN 270 Introduction to Gender Studies 3
RLGN 312 The Mythical Trickster 3
RLGN 315 Heresy and Dissidence in the Middle Ages 3
RLGN 319 The Crusades 3
RLGN 371 Jews under Islam and Christianity 3
RLGN 373 History of the Early Church: First Through Fourth Centuries 3
RLGN 374 Reformation Europe, 1500-1650 3
SASS 325 The Netherlands Social Justice: Health and Violence 3
SASS 375 International Travel and Study Seminar 3
SASS 375A - Human Development in Ecuador
SASS 375B - Mental Health in the Netherlands
SASS 375C - Invisibles in Poland
SASS 375D - Child Welfare in Guatamala
SASS 375E - Microfinance in Bangladesh
SJUS 100 Introduction to Social Justice 3
SOCI 201 Introduction to Gender Studies 3
SOCI 302 Race and Ethnic Minorities in American Society 3
SOCI 326 Gender, Inequality, and Globalization 3
SOCI 328 Urban Sociology 3
SOCI 381 City as Classroom 3
SPAN 303 Latin American History through Art, Literature and Cinema 3
SPAN 325 Hispanic Intellectuals and Society: A Critical Approach 3
SPAN 333 Contemporary Caribbean Literature 3
SPAN 334 Mexican Literature 3
SPAN 339 Latin American Poetic Revolt 3
SPAN 343 The New Drama in Latin American 3
SPAN 356 Afro-Hispanic Literature 3
SPAN 358 Latin American Cinema 3
WGST 201 Introduction to Gender Studies 3
WGST 304 Representations of Black Women and Religion in Film 3
WGST 315A International Bioethics Policy and Practice: Women's Health in the Netherlands 3
WGST 325 Philosophy of Feminism 3
WGST 326 Gender, Inequality, and Globalization 3
WGST 337 Women in the Arab World 3
WGST 343 Language and Gender 3
WGST 353 Women in American History I 3
WGST 354 Women in American History II 3
WGST 363 Gender and Sexuality in America 3
WLIT 325 Hispanic Intellectuals and Society: A Critical Approach 3
WLIT 333 Contemporary Caribbean Literature 3
WLIT 339 Latin American Poetic Revolt 3
WLIT 343 The New Drama in Latin American 3
WLIT 356 Afro-Hispanic Literature 3
WLIT 358 Latin American Cinema 3
WLIT 363H African-American Literature 3
WLIT 365E The Immigrant Experience 3
WLIT 365N Topics in African-American Literature 3
WLIT 365Q Post-Colonial Literature 3
WLIT 366G Minority Literatures 3