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University Technology, [U]Tech

Awareness Training

Awareness Training

Securing your technology doesn’t have to be difficult. Consider safe computing options:

  • I clicked on a link in an email and I think it was a scam (Please view Phishing examples here)
  • I need to change my password (https://its-services.case.edu/my-case-identity/password/change/)
  • I got a strange email and I’m not sure that it’s real (forward email to help@case.edu requesting review or assistance)
  • I think I’ve been hacked; my contacts are emailing me to say that I’m sending them emails that I never sent? (forward email to help@case.edu requesting review or assistance)
  • My CWRU owned computer was stolen -Report the theft to the CWRU Police Department (216) 368-3300

If you had restricted information (eg: patient or research information), also contact help@case.edu.

  • I have research with patient information. How do I protected it? (email help@case.edu requesting Information Security Assistance)
  • I need a data management or data security plan for my grant proposal and/or IRB. (email help@case.edu requesting Information Security Assistance)

Quick Tips for Long Lasting Safety

Your university password guards your entire digital life at Case Western Reserve University. Never share it with others—even friends and family members. Additionally, university departments will never ask you for your password. Emails requesting this information from you are fraudulent and should be deleted.

Your mobile device contains information about you, as well as your friends and family. Don’t let this information fall into the wrong hands. Employ the passcode or lock screen pattern option on your smartphone to ensure only you can access its data. The longer the passcode or pattern, the more secure your phone will be in the event it is lost or stolen. Learn how to secure your mobile phone.

The Case Western Reserve Acceptable Use Policy (https://case.edu/utech/policies/i-1-acceptable-use-of-information-technology-policy-aup/) requires that antivirus software be installed and used on all computers at the university. Download Symantec™ Endpoint Protection for free via the Software Center.

Installing browser plugins is a popular way to extend the functionality of your favorite Web browser. WARNING: when these tools become out of date, they leave the device vulnerable to online attacks.  In fact, many malware infections are a direct result of out-of-date browser plugins. Use Qualys® BrowserCheck to check your Web browser for updates and to find outdated plugins.

Use Identity Finder™ to find, protect or eradicate any sensitive information that may exist on your computer, such as credit card and social security numbers. Download it for free via the Software Center.

(“Phishing: What to do") and learn how to recognize a fraudulent attempt to compromise your credentials. If you receive a suspicious email, forward it to help@case.edu and the Information Security Office can remove access to the fraudulent site, protecting your system and the rest of our community.

Case Western Reserve incorporated two-factor authentication into the Virtual Private Network (VPN) and some Single Sign On (SSO) authenticated applications. Two-factor authentication provides added security by prompting you for a unique code in addition to your password. Learn More>>

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