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Six Ways to Get Secure

Six Ways to Get Secure

Securing your technology doesn’t have to be difficult. Here are the top six ways to compute safely at Case Western Reserve:

  1. Never share your password. Ever. Your university password guards your entire digital life at Case Western Reserve. Never share it with others—even friends and family members. Additionally, university departments will never ask you for your password. Emails requesting this information from you are fraudulent and should be deleted.
  2. Protect your smartphone with a passcode or lock screen pattern. Your mobile device contains information about you, as well as your friends and family. Don’t let this information fall into the wrong hands. Employ the passcode or lock screen pattern option on your smartphone to ensure only you can access its data. The longer the passcode or pattern, the more secure your phone will be in the event it is lost or stolen. Learn how to secure your mobile phone.
  3. Download Symantec™ Endpoint Protection from the Software Center. The Case Western Reserve Acceptable Use Policy requires that antivirus software be installed and used on all computers at the university. Download Symantec™ Endpoint Protection for free via the Software Center.
  4. Use Qualys® BrowserCheck to stay safe online. Installing browser plugins is a popular way to extend the functionality of your favorite Web browser. But when these tools become out of date, they leave you vulnerable to online attacks; in fact, many malware infections are a direct result of out-of-date browser plugins. Use Qualys® BrowserCheck to check your Web browser for updates and to find outdated plugins.
  5. Download Identity Finder™ from the Software Center. Use Identity Finder™ to find, protect or eradicate any sensitive information that may exist on your computer, such as credit card and social security numbers. Download it for free via the Software Center.
  6. Review phishing examples on our website (Phishing: What you need to know) and learn how to recognize a fraudulent attempt to compromise your credentials. If you receive a suspicious email, forward it to help@case.edu and the Information Security Office can remove access to the fraudulent site, protecting your system and the rest of our community.