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Encyclopedia of Cleveland History

CLEVELAND PSYCHIATRIC INSTITUTE

CLEVELAND PSYCHIATRIC INSTITUTE

The CLEVELAND PSYCHIATRIC INSTITUTE (CPI), established in 1945 as the Cleveland State Receiving Hospital, is a short-term psychiatric-care hospital for the observation, care, and treatment of the mentally ill, especially those patients with mild conditions in the early stages and possibly of short duration. Located at 1708 Aiken Ave., in 1986 CPI was the only state short-term psychiatric-care hospital serving Cuyahoga and its 4 neighboring counties. It employed a staff of 16 full-time and 3 part-time doctors and a support staff of 500. The hospital maintained a 226 bed capacity. CPI has also provided psychiatric training for resident physicians from Metropolitan General Hospital and the Medical School of CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIV. (CWRU); NURSING training for students from Lorain Community College; social-work training for students from CWRU's School of Applied Social Sciences; psychiatric training for students from CWRU, Kent State Univ., and CLEVELAND STATE UNIV.; and psychiatric and counseling training for clergy students at Ashland College.

CPI was established when the Ohio legislature approved the creation of a statewide system of receiving hospitals, including one in Cuyahoga County. State officials entered into an agreement with Cleveland City Hospital (Metropolitan General) to assume control of the acute-care facility at Hoover Pavilion (built in 1922) on 1 Nov. 1946. The name CPI has been in use since the early 1960s. Poor state management practices and bureaucratic red tape demoralized the early hospital's staff and delayed improvements as did crowded conditions. Doctors resigned because of low pay and regulations banning private patients. Western Reserve Univ. temporarily withdrew its affiliation in 1949. Program and physical-plant improvements have been slowly made since the 1950s; an out-patient clinic opened in 1952 and a therapy wing was added to Hoover Pavilion in 1957. In 1981 CPI combined its operations with the FAIRHILL MENTAL HEALTH CENTER; the Fairhill Center closed its doors in 1983.


See also MEDICINE, HOSPITALS AND HEALTH PLANNING.