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MILLER, DAYTON CLARENCE

MILLER, DAYTON CLARENCE

MILLER, DAYTON CLARENCE (13 Mar. 1866-22 Feb. 1941) was a pioneer user of x-rays. Born in STRONGSVILLE, Ohio to Charles Webster Dewey and Vienna Pomeroy Miller, he was raised in BEREA and graduated from Baldwin University (BALDWIN-WALLACE COLLEGE) in 1886. He received a doctorate from Princeton in 1890, and became professor of mathematics and physics at Case School of Applied Science (CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY). From 1895-1936, he headed the Physics Dept.

After Konrad von Roentgen's discovery of x-rays in 1895 was reported in the PLAIN DEALER, Miller, who worked in surgical x-rays, built an x-ray apparatus with a Crookes Tube and 12 wet-cell batteries. In 1896, he x-rayed his entire body section by section, producing the first full x-ray of the human body. The value of these x-rays became partially realized when Miller used the process to detect an improperly set broken arm of a patient of Dr. GEO. CRILE. Miller's other interests included sound; he developed a "phonodeik" (forerunner of the oscilloscope) and worked on architectural acoustics for many buildings, including SEVERANCE HALL. He also performed and composed music; built a pipe organ; made a golden flute; and collected 1,500 flutes which were left to the Library of Congress. As a consultant for the Aeolian Co., he was instrumental in developing the Webber piano. In 1921, Miller met with Albert Einstein regarding his recreation of the Michelson-Morley experiments that had led to the development of the Theory of Relativity.

Miller married Edith Easton in 1893. He died in Cleveland and was buried in LAKE VIEW CEMETERY.