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Encyclopedia of Cleveland History

RUMBOLD, CHARLOTTE MARGARET

RUMBOLD, CHARLOTTE MARGARET

RUMBOLD, CHARLOTTE MARGARET (28 Dec. 1869-2 July 1960), was active in urban planning in 2 cities, St. Louis, Mo., and Cleveland. Daughter of Thomas Frazier and Charlotte Rumbold, she was born in Belleville, Illinois, graduated from Columbia University and studied social work in Europe. Rumbold worked in St. Louis as superintendent of playgrounds and recreation (1906-15) and through her time there was involved in the national Playground Assoc. of America (1906). She became acquainted with FRANCIS F. PRENTISS and others who championed the "city efficient." Holding to the principle of equal pay, Rumbold left St. Louis in 1915 when the Board of Aldermen refused to raise her salary.

Rumbold, at the request of the CLEVELAND FOUNDATION, undertook a social survey in 1916 on commercial recreation. She worked for the Chamber of Commerce (1917-38) as assistant secretary and secretary of its City Plan Committee until her retirement. Nationally and locally, as a member of the WOMEN'S CITY CLUB, Rumbold argued for the planned city: land-use ZONING (see VILLAGE OF EUCLID V. AMBLER REALTY CO.); the Group Plan; PUBLIC HOUSING, PARKS, and HIGHWAYS. She was secretary and board member for several chamber-initiated groups, such as the Euclid Ave. Assoc. (1920). WM. HOPKINS appointed her to the Cleveland City Plan Commission (1924-42). Rumbold sparked the Ohio Planning Conference (1919), serving as its president, secretary, treasurer, and statehouse lobbyist. In 1933, as secretary of Cleveland Homes, Inc., she secured New Deal funds for the Cedar-Central housing project. Rumbold was described in 1945 by LOUIS B. SELTZER: "Tiny Woman Never Shrinks from Storms." A Catholic, Rumbold died in Cleveland and was buried in Belleville, Ill. She never married.