Courses

Instructor(s):
Rivka Taub
Tuesdays, September 4-December 18|10 a.m.-noon (No class: September 11; 18; 25 & October 2)

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language as well as enjoy Hebrew Literature, songs, drama and film, read Israeli newspapers and view Israeli television. 

Instructor(s):
Leah Cooper
Tuesdays, September 4-December 18|6:30–8:30 p.m. (No class: September 11; 18; 25 & October 2)

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language as well as enjoy Hebrew Literature, songs, drama and film, read Israeli newspapers and view Israeli television.

Instructor(s):
Judith Shamir
Tuesdays, September 4-December 18|10 a.m.–noon (No class: September 11; 18; 25 & October 2)

Hebrew literature engages advanced students in fictional novels and plays by leading Israeli authors and playwrights.

Instructor(s):
Dahna Gordon Baskin
Mondays, September 17-December 17|6:30-8:30 p.m. (no class: September 24 & October 1)

Over the course of our studies, students will be exposed to the sights and sounds of the original Hebrew letters appearing in the Bible. Students will have multiple opportunities to absorb the content using various activities, games and manipulatives. No prior knowledge of Hebrew is necessary.

Instructor(s):
Don Rosenberg
Wednesdays, January 02-23|1:30-3:30 p.m.

Before he was forced to flee Germany in 1933, Kurt Weill had developed a successful career as the composer of concert works, operas, and, especially, a provocative stage piece with Bertolt Brecht, “The Threepenny Opera.”

Instructor(s):
Joel Chazin
Mondays, January 07-February 11|10:30-11:30 a.m. (no class January 21)

This course draws on Gershom Scholem’s dazzling and groundbreaking work Major Trends in Jewish Mysticism, to explain the deep influence that mystical thinking had on shaping some of Jewish liturgy’s key prayers. Study with Rabbi Joel Chazin, who served as chaplain and director of religious services at Montefiore.

Instructor(s):
Darlene Montonaro
Tuesdays, January 08-January 29|10 a.m.-noon

Showing up to write isn’t half the battle – it is the battle. This class will help you develop writing habits that will boost your confidence, help you find your "voice," and keep your writing process in motion.

Instructor(s):
Joe Konen
Thursdays, January 10-March 7 |10-11:30 a.m. (No class Feb 14)

In our unique genomes, every one of us carries the story of our species--births, deaths, disease, war, famine, migration, and a lot of sex. But those stories have always been locked away--until now. Geneticists have suddenly become historians, and the hard evidence in our DNA has blown the lid off what we thought we knew.

Instructor(s):
Pamela Belknap
Mondays, January 14-March 04|10-11:30 a.m.

Two new biographies present fresh, contemporary perspectives on hero Winston Churchill and his wife, Clementine, who was indispensable to his life and important to Great Britain.  Discuss their unique personalities, fascinating marriage, and critical contributions to their nation.  Compare and contrast with the lives of the Roosevelts.  

Instructor(s):
Whitney Lloyd
Mondays, January 14–March 04|10:30 a.m.-noon

This class will examine a chaotic period of British history following the death of Queen Elizabeth I. We will explore the reign of the Stuart monarchs, James I, and his son, Charles I, followed by the Civil War and Interregnum under Oliver Cromwell’s leadership, climaxing in the execution of Charles I.

Instructor(s):
Jim Lane
Mondays, January 14-March 4|10:30 a.m.-noon

Relive the intense struggle of Michelangelo in his restless search for Truth and Beauty. Set in the turbulent world of 14th and 15th century Italy with its plotting princes, warring popes, brilliant artists and authors, there is indeed a new awakening which reshapes the future of Europe and Western civilization.

Instructor(s):
Pat Moore
Tuesdays, January 15-March 5|10–11:30 a.m.

In this course we will engage in a discussion and review of the foundations of US citizenship and how our founders expected us, the American people, to properly fulfill our citizenship role.

Instructor(s):
Jim Lane
Tuesdays, January 15–March 05|2-3:30 p.m.

With regards to Western civilization, all roads do indeed lead to Rome. Mary Beard, the esteemed classicist at Cambridge University, takes us on a journey to the heart and soul of Rome, from its inception in 753 BC, through its Republican phase, and into its Imperial age— nearly a thousand-year span of triumph and tragedy, success and strife.

Instructor(s):
Jim Van Horn
Tuesday, January 15-March 5|1-2:30 p.m.

David McCullough’s book is “history on a grand scale – a book about politics and war and social issues, but also about human nature, love, religious faith, virtue, ambition, friendship, and betrayal, and the far-reaching consequences of noble ideas.”

Book: John Adams, David McCullough

Instructor(s):
Charlene Mileti
Thursdays, January 17-March 7|10:30 a.m.-noon

"... A magisterial account of Rome and its remarkable ascent from an obscure agrarian backwater to the greatest empire the world has ever known." The reader is not only witness to the fascinating birth of Rome, but also its inevitable decline.

Instructor(s):
Terry Meehan
Thursdays, January 17–March 7|10:30 a.m.-noon

Three of the top espionage writers of the mid-twentieth century were well acquainted with the secret world of spycraft. Both Ian Fleming and John le Carré were spooks for British Intelligence, while Len Deighton lived next door to Anna Wolkoff, a Nazi mole whose arrest he witnessed.

Instructor(s):
Pamela Belknap
Thursdays, January 17–March 07|10-11:30 a.m.

As a young social worker, Frances Perkins witnessed the traumatic Triangle Shirtwaist fire of 1911, which killed 146 workers. She immediately became an activist, as well as a lifelong advocate for critical reforms and programs. Learn
how Labor Secretary Perkins teamed with FDR to create the New Deal legislation, which continues today. 

Instructor(s):
Pat Moore
Fridays, January 18-March 08|10:30 a.m.-noon

In this course we will engage in discussion and review of the foundation of U.S. citizenship and how our founders expected us, the American people, to properly fulfill our citizenship role.

Instructor(s):
Pamela Belknap
Fridays, January 18-March 08|10-11:30 a.m.

Two new biographies present fresh, contemporary perspectives on hero Winston Churchill and his wife, Clementine, who was indispensable to his life and important to Great Britain.  Discuss their unique personalities, fascinating marriage, and critical contributions to their nation.  Compare and contrast with the lives of the Roosevelts.  

Instructor(s):
Janice Vitullo
Saturdays, January 19-May 4 |9-10:30 a.m.

In this introductory course, students develop a strong foundation in vocabulary and grammar. Participants are introduced to all four of the key skills for language acquisition: listening, speaking, reading and writing.

Instructor(s):
Marissa Strange
Saturdays, January 19-May 4|9-10:30 a.m.

This course introduces students to the Spanish language. Participants study basic language skills, including comprehension, speaking, reading and writing, with emphasis on the present tense. Additional focus will be on the mastery of the sound system and basic sentence structure of spoken and written Spanish.

Instructor(s):
Francesca Calanni
Saturdays, January 19-May 4|9-10:30 a.m.

This course introduces students to the Italian language. Participants study basic language skills, including comprehension, speaking, reading and writing, with emphasis on the present tense. Additional focus will be on the mastery of the sound system and basic sentence structure of spoken and written Italian. 

Instructor(s):
Barbara Greenberg
Mondays, January 21-March 11|1-2:30 p.m.

In this timely look at the confirmation process, Wil Haygood’s book reveals Lyndon B. Johnson’s masterful political talent in getting Thurgood Marshall appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court. 

Book: Showdown, Wil Haygood

Instructor(s):
Barbara Greenberg
Tuesdays, January 22-March 12|1-2:30 p.m.

In this timely look at the confirmation process, Wil Haygood’s book reveals Lyndon B. Johnson’s masterful political talent in getting Thurgood Marshall appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court. 

Book: Showdown, Wil Haygood

Instructor(s):
Linda Tuthill
Wednesdays, January 23-March 6|1–3 p.m

Creative nonfiction comes in many shapes and sizes and covers topics as varied as basketball and band practice. Class members respond to prompts and share writing with class members who listen closely and give constructive feedback.

Instructor(s):
Barbara Greenberg
Wednesdays, January 23-March 13|1-2:30 p.m.

In this timely look at the confirmation process, Wil Haygood’s book reveals Lyndon B. Johnson’s masterful political talent in getting Thurgood Marshall appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Book: Showdown, Wil Haygood.

Instructor(s):
Linda Tuthill
Thursdays, January 24-March 7|1–3 p.m.

Allen Ginsberg claimed "The only thing that can save the world is the reclaiming of the awareness of the world. That is what poetry does." 

Instructor(s):
Matt Goldish
Mondays, January 28-March 4|6:30–8:30 p.m. (no class February 18 & February 25)

Messianic figures have appeared among the Jews since biblical times. The Renaissance period, however, saw a dramatic increase in the frequency of messianic episodes.

Instructor(s):
Jim Bonk, Barbara Green, Lee Makela, Catherine B. Scallen, Daniel Melnick, Ben Sperry
Tuesdays-Wednesdays-Thursdays, January 29-April 18|1:30-3:30 p.m.

Sign up for our full Senior Scholars Spring 2019 lineup (Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays), which includes courses on Modern East Asia, the roots of today's Russia, the "Japanese Experience," Dutch artists Rembrandt and Vermeer, how literature and music connect, and catalysts for social change.

Instructor(s):
Staff
Tuesdays, January 29-March 05|1-2 p.m.

Please join us for gallery talks hosted by the Cleveland Museum of Art, one of the world’s most distinguished comprehensive art museums and one of northeastern Ohio’s principal civic and cultural institutions. 

Instructor(s):
Jim Bonk, Visiting Assistant Professor, History Department, Case Western Reserve University & Barbara Green, Professor Emerita, Political Science, Cleveland State University 
Tuesdays, January 29-April 16|1:30-3:30 p.m.

Past in the Present: History and the Making of Modern East Asia

January 29-March 5 | 1:30-3:30 p.m.

LECTURER: Jim Bonk, Visiting Assistant Professor, History Department, Case Western Reserve University

Instructor(s):
Lee Makela, Professor Emeritus, Cleveland State University & Catherine B. Scallen, Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the Humanities, Case Western Reserve University
Wednesdays, January 30-April 17|1:30-3:30 p.m.

The Twenty-First Century Traveler: Considering the "Japanese Experience"

January 30-March 6 | 1:30-3:30 p.m.

LECTURER: Lee Makela, Professor Emeritus, Cleveland State University

Instructor(s):
Staff
Thursdays, January 31-March 07|1-2 p.m

Please join us for gallery talks hosted by the Cleveland Museum of Art, one of the world’s most distinguished comprehensive art museums and one of northeastern Ohio’s principal civic and cultural institutions.

Instructor(s):
Daniel Melnick, Lecturer in SAGES, Case Western Reserve University & Ben Sperry, Lecturer in SAGES, Case Western Reserve University
Thursdays, January 31-April 18|1:30-3:30 p.m.

From the Renaissance to the Modern: How Literature and Music Connect

January 31-March 7 | 1:30-3:30 p.m.

Lecturer: Daniel Melnick, Lecturer in SAGES, Case Western Reserve University

Instructor(s):
Thomas Yantek
Fridays, February 01–March 22|10:30 a.m.-noon

It is probably no exaggeration to refer to Homer’s epic work, The Odyssey, as the ur-story in Western literature: the opus from which, in one form or another, all subsequent literary work has sprung. Somewhat like Moby Dick, however, Homer’s tale may rank among the least-read classic works of all time (in its entirety, at any rate).

Instructor(s):
Lee Chilcote
Fridays, February 01-February 22|10 a.m.-noon

Learn the fundamentals of writing personal essays, including turning memories into stories, establishing yourself as a character, and using tools like scene and dialogue to make your writing more compelling, and establishing your own truth.

Instructor(s):
Dahna Baskin
Mondays, February 04-May 06 4|6:30-8:30 p.m. (no class: February 18; April 22)

Over the course of our studies, students will be exposed to the sights and sounds of the original Hebrew letters appearing in the Bible. Students will have multiple opportunities to absorb the content using various activities, games and manipulatives. No prior knowledge of Hebrew is necessary.

Instructor(s):
Rivka Taub
Tuesdays, February 05-April 30|10 a.m.-noon (no class:April 23)

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language as well as enjoy Hebrew Literature, songs, drama and film, read Israeli newspapers and view Israeli television.

Instructor(s):
Judith Shamir
Tuesdays, February 05-April 30|10 a.m.-noon (No class: April 23)

Hebrew literature engages advanced students in fictional novels and plays by leading Israeli authors and playwrights.

Instructor(s):
Charlene Mileti
Tuesdays, February 05-26|2-3:30 p.m.

This four-part discussion focuses on the award-winning book: Citizen: An American Lyric, by Claudia Rankine. Through her poetic narrative, Ms. Rankine invites and entreats the reader to consider life through her personal and objective experience of being black in America. The grave truths beautifully laid bare by Ms.

Instructor(s):
Leah Cooper
Tuesdays, February 05-April 30|6:30–8:30 p.m. (no class: April 23)

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language as well as enjoy Hebrew Literature, songs, drama and film, read Israeli newspapers and view Israeli television.

Instructor(s):
Rivka Taub
Wednesdays, February 06-May 1|1-3 p.m. (no class: April 24)

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language as well as enjoy Hebrew Literature, songs, drama and film, read Israeli newspapers and view Israeli television.

Instructor(s):
Rosette Barron Haim
Wednesdays, February 06-February 20|1-2:30 p.m.

Abraham Joshua Heschel, leading 20th-century Jewish theologian, taught that “Judaism revolves around three sacred entities: God, Torah, Israel.” In this series of discussions, we will explore the way these three elements offer an organizing principle for understanding Jewish holidays, prayer themes, aspects of the commandments, and more.

Instructor(s):
Leah Cooper
Wednesdays, February 06-May 22|6:30-8:30 p.m. (no class: March 20, April 24; May 1; May 8)

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language as well as enjoy Hebrew Literature, songs, drama and film, read Israeli newspapers and view Israeli television.

Instructor(s):
Leah Cooper
Thursdays, February 07-May 23 |10 a.m.-noon (no class: March 21; April 18, 25; May 2)

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language as well as enjoy Hebrew Literature, songs, drama and film, read Israeli newspapers and view Israeli television.

Instructor(s):
Rivka Taub
Thursdays, February 07-May 23|6:30-8:30 p.m. (no class: March 21; April 18; April 25; May 2)

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language as well as enjoy Hebrew Literature, songs, drama and film, read Israeli newspapers and view Israeli television.

Instructor(s):
Judith Shamir
Thursdays, February 07-May 23|10 a.m.-noon (no class: March 21; April 18; April 25; May 2)

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language as well as enjoy Hebrew Literature, songs, drama and film, read Israeli newspapers and view Israeli television.

Instructor(s):
Jo Bruce
Mondays, March 04-March 25|10-11:30 a.m.

Terse and often mysterious, the stories of the Bible contain gaps and unanswered questions. Why did Lot’s wife turn into a pillar of salt? What did Cain say to Abel in the moments before murdering him? How did Abraham discover God? Trying to make sense of these puzzles, sages of the Rabbinic period recorded details to flesh out the texts.

Instructor(s):
Donna Rumenik
Tuesdays, March 05-March 26|1–3 p.m.

This course examines some of the little-known or untold stories of women who defied Nazi ideology. Specific attention will be given to women who were partisans and women who used their traditional gender role expectations to disguise their actions against the Nazis.

Instructor(s):
Eric Kisch
Thursdays, March 07-April 11|1-3 p.m.

This course will discuss why we need orchestra conductors, some history of the development of modern conducting, and present musical examples (mostly in video format) of some of the greatest conductors of this and the last century.

Instructor(s):
Linda Tuthill
Tuesdays, April 23-May 28|1-3 p.m.

Class members write memoir, essays or other forms of nonfiction and bring work to share with the group. Careful listening and response to pieces read in class.

Instructor(s):
Linda Tuthill
Wednesdays, April 24-May 29|1-3 p.m.

Class members write memoir, essays or other forms of nonfiction and bring work to share with the group. Careful listening and response to pieces read in class.

Instructor(s):
Linda Tuthill
Thursdays, April 25-May 30|1-3 p.m.

The poet Naomi Shihab Nye begins a poem with these words: “Before you know what kindness really is / you must lose things.” Poetry is a way to share both depths and heights. Bring 15 copies of a poem you have written to the first class.

Instructor(s):
Matt Goldish
Mondays, April 29-May 20|6:30–8:30 p.m.

This course examines the story of the Maharal of Prague and his Golem—a clay man animated through Jewish mystical wisdom. The story of Jews and artificial men, however, is both older and newer, deeper and more popular. We will discuss the idea of the magical man from the Talmud until the 20th century in rabbinic literature, fiction, and film.

Instructor(s):
Carol Salus
Mondays, April 29–May 20|1-2:30 p.m.

Depicting the Holocaust and narrating the events around it raise difficult moral and philosophical conundrums. Yet, artists, photographers and architects have not shied away from the challenge.

Instructor(s):
Brian Amkraut, Executive Director of the Siegal Lifelong Learning Program, CWRU & Alanna Cooper, Director of Jewish Lifelong Learning, CWRU
Tuesdays, April 30-May 21|7-9 p.m.

Books today serve as a dominant form for disseminating and consuming information. But the book—as a platform for writing and reading—is relatively new, and it may one day become obsolete. The bound and printed paper book was preceded by tablets, scrolls and manuscripts, and it may become a historical relic as electronic media takes over.

Instructor(s):
Larry Josefovitz
Thursdays, May 02-May 23|1-3 p.m.

Wagner’s final opera, Parsifal, premiered at the second Bayreuth Festival in 1882, was performed at the Metropolitan Opera in 1903, and found its way to the New York Yiddish stage in 1913. Despite Christian symbolism and possible antisemitic suggestion, the opera has inspired Jews to listen, perform, and promote a work of genius.

Instructor(s):
Timothy O. Matson
Fridays, May 03-June 07|6:30-8:30 a.m.

Explore the bluebird trail, watch busy bobolinks, or be rewarded with a rare sighting of Henslow’s Sparrow. May and June are busy months for birds. Migrants arrive and some continue their journeys northward. Others, along with permanent residents, establish and actively defend their territories and carry out reproductive activities.

Instructor(s):
Anthony Wexler
Wednesdays, May 08-May 29|10-11:30 a.m.

This seminar considers the work of two of America’s most celebrated Jewish literary figures, who represent very different strands of American Jewish writing. Philip Roth’s assimilated characters seem cut off from the wellspring of Jewish identity, and even actively rebel against the tradition.

Instructor(s):
Jay Abercrombie
Wednesdays, June 05–June 19|10 a.m.–noon

This field seminar provides a close look at the plants, wildlife and geology of Squire Valleevue Farm.

No strenuous hiking will be involved but participants should be able to maintain an active pace over generally moderate but occasionally hilly or wet terrain.

Instructor(s):
Patricia Sigmier
Fridays, June 07–June 28|10 a.m.–2 p.m.

Enjoy the experience of painting in the outdoors at the University’s scenic Squire Valleevue and Valley Ridge Farms. The instructor uses watercolor, however, any medium is acceptable. The group meets each session at a predetermined location on the farm, paints for 2-3 hours, and then gathers for a bag lunch and viewing of the paintings.