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Siegal Lifelong Learning

Literature + Writing

Literature + Writing

Sundays, January 7-February 25 | 5:00-6:30 p.m.

 

Joseph Jacoby, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

It would be fun and instructive to sample several of the flood of outstanding books written by women in recent years. We begin with Elizabeth Strout's Pulitzer Prize-winning Olive Kitteridge, a study of a formidable but flawed New England woman. We continue with the remarkably original voice of Penelope Fitzgerald's masterpiece, The Gates of Angels, set in 1913 Cambridge, England. We conclude with Ann Patchett's Commonwealth, a fascinating work based on her own family.  Books: Elizabeth Strout, Olive Kitteridge, Penelope Fitzgerald, The Gates of Angels, and Ann Patchett, Commonwealth

 

Private Residence, 13803 Cormere Ave., Cleveland | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

 

Mondays, January 15-March 5 | 1-2:30 p.m.


Charlene Mileti, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

Maurizio Viroli brings to life the fascinating writer of THE PRINCE, "who was the founder of modern political thought. Niccolò Machiavelli's works on the theory and practice of statecraft are classics, but Viroli sugggest's that his greatest accomplishment is his robust philosophy of life -- his deep beliefs about how one should conduct oneself as a modern citizen in a republic, as a responsible family member, as a good person. On these subjects Machiavelli wrote no books: the text of his philosophy is his life itself, a life that was filled with paradox, uncertainty, and tragic drama."

Book: Maurizio Viroli (trans. Anthony Shugar), Niccolo's Smile: A Biography of Machiavellii; Niccolo Machiavellii, The Prince

 

Gates Mills Community House | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

 

Mondays, January 15-March 5 | 1-2:30 p.m.
 

Terry Meehan, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

Three of the top espionage writers of the mid-twentieth century were well acquainted with the secret world of spycraft. Both Ian Fleming and John le Carré were spooks for British Intelligence, while Len Deighton lived next door to Anna Wolkoff a Nazi mole whose arrest he witnessed. Three of their best novels have been adapted to the screen, resulting in movies that are highly regarded by audiences, critics and even grumpy ex-spies.

We will begin with a lively discussion of the novel itself followed by a screening of its film adaptation. Then we’ll take a close look at how successfully the filmmaker transformed the book’s ideas and characters into cinema.

Books and Movies: Ian Fleming, From Russia with Love, Film directed by Terence Young (1963); Len Deighton, The Ipcress File, Film directed by Sidney J. Furie (1965); John le Carré, The Spy Who Came in from the Cold, Film directed by Martin Ritt (1965)

 

Rocky River Public Library | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

Tuesdays, January 16-March 6 | 1–2:30 p.m.


Joseph Jacoby, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

In this book discussion course, participants examine English novelists who are profoundly interested in issues of ethics and morality. Iris Murdoch's classic work examines a group of well-intentioned, but muddled idealists in the Gloucestershire countryside. The past collides with the present in Julian Barnes' novel about the tragic death of an intimate friend. Ian McEwan's newly published novel explores the clash of religious and secular world views in the law courts of contemporary London.

Books: The Bell, I. Murdoch; The Sense of an Ending, J. Barnes; The Children Act, I. McEwan

 

Private Residence: 6814 Rosemont Ave., Brecksville 44141 | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

 

Wednesdays, January 17-February 28 | 1–3 p.m.

 

Linda Tuthill, Instructor in Lifelong Learning, CWRU

 

We will examine different genres of nonfiction, with its great range of possibilities, and write in response to assigned reading. Participants share work in class and receive constructive feedback. Newcomers are welcome.

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: $90; Nonmembers: $110 | REGISTER > 

Thursdays, January 18-March 8 | 10-11:30 a.m.

 

Pamela Belknap, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

Two new biographies present fresh, contemporary perspectives on hero Winston Churchill and his wife, Clementine, who was indispensable to his life and important to Great Britain. Discuss their unique personalities, fascinating marriage, and critical contributions to their nation. Compare and contrast with the lives of the Roosevelts.


Books: Boris Johnson, The Churchill Factor: How One Man Made History; Sonia Purnell, Clementine: The Life of Mrs. Winston Churchill

 

Middleburg Heights United Church of Christ | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

Thursdays, January 18-March 1 | 1–3 p.m.
 

Linda Tuthill, Instructor in Lifelong Learning, CWRU

 

Poet Gregory Orr writes: And words, words / In a poem or song / Aren’t they a stream / On which your feelings float? On poetry afternoons the words of our poems become a stream through sharing. Bring 15 copies of a poem you have written to the first session. Newcomers are welcome. 

 

St. Paul's Episcopal Church | Lifelong Learning Members: $90; Nonmembers: $110 | REGISTER >

 

Wednesdays, January 31-April 18 | 1:30–3:30 p.m.

HAMLET: A PRINCE THROUGH THE CENTURIES
Wednesdays, January 31-March 7
Through a combination of close reading, critical analysis, and research inquiry, the class will navigate a rigorous exploration of what makes The Tragical History of Hamlet Prince of Denmark – a play over four hundred years old – the enduring drama that it is?
In short, we’ll consider Hamlet not only as a literary text but also as a vital dramatic script, one crafted with language and theatrical action to challenge and thrill a socially and economically diverse audience. To this end – in addition to extensive reading – the course will critically examine a number of film adaptations of Shakespeare’s work.
INSTRUCTOR: John Orlock, Samuel B. and Virginia C. Knight Professor of Humanities, Department of English, Case Western Reserve University

No classes March 13, 14, 15 – CWRU Spring Break

POP MUSIC AND CULTURE IN THE 1960's
Wednesdays, March 21-April 18
This course will be a quick and tuneful survey of the music of the 1960s. We’ll look at some of the major trends, figures, and themes to arise in pop music while the Baby Boomers were coming of age, and explore everything from the hysteria of the British Invasion to the tragedy at Altamont.
INSTRUCTOR: Daniel Goldmark, Professor of Music, Case Western Reserve University

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: $115; Nonmembers: $135 | REGISTER >

 

Saturdays, February 3-March 10 | 10:30 a.m.-noon

  

Janice Vitullo, Classics Teacher, Laurel School

 

This class comprises a close reading and discussion of the Oresteia by Aeschylus as well as plays by Sophocles and Euripides that pertain to the Trojan War Cycle.

Required Texts: Aeschylus: The Oresteia, translated by Robert Fagles, ISBN# 0140443339; Sophocles: Electra and Other Plays, translated by David Raeburn, ISBN# 0140449785; Ten Plays by Euripides, translated by Moses Hadas and John McLean, ISBN# 0553213636.

NB: As these translations will be heavily referenced during class, students are advised not to buy different ones.

 

Laurel School - Lyman Campus | Lifelong Learning Members: $90; Nonmembers: $110 | REGISTER >

 

Thursdays, February 15–March 8 | 1-3 p.m.

 

Reva Leizman, Instructor of Lifelong Learning, CWRU

 

Polish Jewish brothers I.J. Singer and I.B. Singer grew up in Eastern Europe and used their fiction to portray the politics, family dynamics and religious life there before Jewish life was destroyed in the Holocaust. A collection of short stories by these authors will be available for the class in order to learn about their lives, the characters in their fiction and Jewish life in Eastern Europe. 

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: $60; Nonmembers: $75 | REGISTER >

Thursdays, March 1-8 | 7-8:30 p.m.

 

Sylvia Abrams, Professor Emeritus and former Dean of Siegal College

 

Winner of the prestigious Man Booker Prize for International Fiction, A Horse Walks Into a Bar is the latest novel from acclaimed Israeli author David Grossman. In the words of the Booker Prize judges, Grossman "shines a spotlight on the effects of grief, without any hint of sentimentality. The central character is challenging and flawed, but completely compelling."

 

Cuyahoga County Public Library, Mayfield Branch | Free and open to the public (advanced registration recommended) | REGISTER >

Co-sponsored by the Cuyahoga County Public Library 

 

Mondays, March 19-May 7 | 1-2:30 p.m.

 

Barbara ParrLeader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

This book discussion course examines George Orwell’s classic 1984, which is, perhaps, more relevant today than it was when published in 1948. Discussions focus on the literary merit of the novel as well as the cultural, philosophical, and political topics Orwell includes. The course also examines Animal Farm, apolical allegory and brilliant satire.

Books: G. Orwell, 1984 and Animal Farm

 

Rocky River Library | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

Tuesdays, March 20-May 8 | 10-11:30 a.m.

 

Bill Pennington, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

Obviously, this 100-year-old classic by British author Kenneth Grahame appeals to all generations. But according to two, recently-published, annotated versions and an Oxford World Classics special edition, The Wind in the Willows was really written for adults.

While we take this fun ride again (or for the first time), we will study and discuss how this enlightening and enriching book came to life; what are some of it’s hidden meanings; what makes it a classic; and what’s in it for us in 2017?

Book: Kenneth Grahame (Seth Lerer, Editor), The Wind in the Willows: An Annotated Edition

 

Lakewood United Methodist Church | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

 

Thursdays, March 22-May 10 | 10–11:30 a.m.

 

Cheryl Wires, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

T.S. Eliot praised The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins as “the first…and the best of modern English detective novels.” Literary critics concur, crediting Collins, along with Edgar Allan Poe, with creating the detective genre. The moonstone, a sacred diamond stolen from an Indian shrine and bequeathed to a beautiful young woman, mysteriously disappears from her English country house. Collins, writing in 1868, developed a number of elements, which have become popular conventions in contemporary detective fiction.

Books: Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone; Andre Lycett, Wilkie Collins: A Life of Sensation (selected chapters)

 

Westlake United Methodist Church | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

Thursdays, March 22-May 10 | 10-11:30 a.m.

 

Bill Pennington, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

Obviously, this 100-year-old classic by British author Kenneth Grahame appeals to all generations. But according to two, recently-published, annotated versions and an Oxford World Classics special edition, The Wind in the Willows was really written for adults.

While we take this fun ride again (or for the first time), we will study and discuss how this enlightening and enriching book came to life; what are some of it’s hidden meanings; what makes it a classic; and what’s in it for us in 2017?

Book: Kenneth Grahame (Seth Lerer, Editor), The Wind in the Willows: An Annotated Edition

 

Middleburg Heights United Church of Christ | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER > 

Thursdays, March 22-May 10 | 10-11:30 a.m.

 

Barbara Parr, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

This book discussion course examines George Orwell’s classic 1984, which is, perhaps, more relevant today than it was when published in 1948. Discussions focus on the literary merit of the novel as well as the cultural, philosophical, and political topics Orwell includes. The course also examines Animal Farm, apolical allegory and brilliant satire.

Books: G. Orwell, 1984 and Animal Farm

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

Fridays, March 23-May 11 | 10:30 a.m.-noon

 

Joe KonenLeader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

This book offers us a vehicle for a nuanced understanding of Islam. Carla Power, a Western reporter who grew up in several predominantly Muslim countries, writes of her dialogues with prominent India-born and now London-based Sheikh Mohammad Akram Nadwi. The dialogue enlightens us on a nonviolent understanding of Islam. The Sheik shows us how he distinguishes between culture and politics on the one hand and religion and spirituality on the other. Book: If the Oceans Were Ink: An Unlikely Friendship and a Journey to the Heart of the Quran, Carla Power (2015).


St. Paul's Episcopal Church | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

 

Tuesdays, April 10–May 1 | 6:30-8 p.m.

 

Andrea Peck, Adjunct Professor, Cuyahoga Community College; Group Facilitator; Author

 

"There is no greater agony than bearing an untold story inside you." - Maya Angelou


Whether we’re entertaining an audience, motivating employees, commemorating loved ones, reflecting upon valuable life lessons, or passing down history from one generation to the next, stories are an integral part of our personal and professional work and lives. Learn why stories are so valuable and about the different types and characteristics of effective stories. Connect with the stories that have made a difference in your life and experience -- first-hand -- the skills and techniques of effective storytelling.

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: $60; Nonmembers: $75 | REGISTER >

Thursdays, April 12–May 17 | 1–3 p.m.
 

Susan Kisch, Instructor of Lifelong Learning, CWRU

 

G’day. Australia is a world away and its official language is English but its history, identity, natural environment and indigenous cultures are different from the American experience. In this course, we will examine these diversities and how they are expressed in short stories. This is an opportunity to read some extraordinary writing about the conditions and history “Down Under,” which is different from our own, yet continues to fascinate and resonate with us since it too is a nation of immigrants.


Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: $90; Nonmembers: $110 | REGISTER >

 

Fridays, April 13-May 4 | 2-3:30 p.m.

 

Sylvia Abrams, Professor Emeritus and former Dean of Siegal College

 

Count Alexandar Rostov has been sentenced to house arrest in Moscow’s Metropol Hotel by a Bolshevik tribunal. How Rostov constructs a meaningful life is the center of Amor Towles best-selling novel, A Gentleman in Moscow. We will examine how Towles contrasts the elegant world-class Metropol to the events in the Soviet Union from in this surprisingly light-hearted novel.

 

Cuyahoga County Public Library-Beachwood Branch | Free and open to the public (advanced registration recommended) REGISTER >

Co-sponsored by the Cuyahoga County Public Library 

Mondays, April 23-May 14 | 1:30-3:30 p.m.

 

Sylvia AbramsProfessor Emeritus and former Dean of Siegal College

 

Rachel Kalish weaves an extraordinary mystery in The Weight of Ink, when Helen Watt, an ailing scholar of Jewish history, is asked to examine a treasure trove of seventeenth-century documents apparently untouched for three centuries in an old London house. Watts and her assistance, Aaron Levy, are an unlikely pair of literary detectives. This detailed historical epic offers a surprisingly gripping storyline. We will explore how Kalish straddles two time periods, the year 2000 and the 1660s. 

 

Cuyahoga County Public Library, Orange BranchFree and open to the public (advanced registration recommended) | REGISTER >

Wednesdays, May 9-May 30 | 7-8:30 p.m.

 

Barbara ParrInstructor of Lifelong Learning, CWRU

 

To Kill a Mockingbird is a masterpiece of American literature that speaks to our current time as poignantly as it did in 1960. This work continues to be banned from school reading lists due to its controversial subject material. Harper Lee’s characters are vivid and lively, enmeshed in issues of family, community and the greater struggles of American society.

The tender voice of the nine-year-old Scout Finch narrates the impact of the tension-filled trial on a sleepy southern town. The timeless issues of class, courage, compassion and gender roles are all seen through the lens of an innocent child as a crisis of conscience hits the town.

 

Lakewood Public Library | Free and open to the public (advanced registration recommended) REGISTER >

Wednesdays, June 13-27 | 7-8:30 p.m.

 

Cheryl WiresInstructor of Lifelong Learning, CWRU

 

In this three-week series, we’ll discuss The Gentle Subversive, Mark Hamilton Lytle’s account of Rachel Carson’s life and lasting legacy. By writing Silent Spring, this woman scientist reluctantly challenged the 1960s establishment regarding pesticide use. Carson sparked a fierce debate a half-century ago, a debate which inspired the creation of the environmental movement and resonates in our current conversations about public policies. Why does Lytle characterize Carson as a “gentle subversive?” What is the story of Silent Spring, one of the most controversial and consequential books in American history? Join our discussion, and learn how Carson’s life and success with Silent Spring make her a heroine for all seasons.

Book: Mark Hamilton Lytle, The Gentle Subversive

 

Lakewood Public Library | Free and open to the public (advanced registration recommended) REGISTER >