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Siegal Lifelong Learning

Off-Campus Studies

Off-Campus Studies

East Side Courses

Sundays, January 7-February 25 | 5:00-6:30 p.m.

 

Joseph Jacoby, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

It would be fun and instructive to sample several of the flood of outstanding books written by women in recent years. We begin with Elizabeth Strout's Pulitzer Prize-winning Olive Kitteridge, a study of a formidable but flawed New England woman. We continue with the remarkably original voice of Penelope Fitzgerald's masterpiece, The Gates of Angels, set in 1913 Cambridge, England. We conclude with Ann Patchett's Commonwealth, a fascinating work based on her own family.  Books: Elizabeth Strout, Olive Kitteridge, Penelope Fitzgerald, The Gates of Angels, and Ann Patchett, Commonwealth

 

Private Residence, 13803 Cormere Ave., Cleveland | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

 

Mondays, January 15-March 5 | 1-2:30 p.m.


Charlene Mileti, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

Maurizio Viroli brings to life the fascinating writer of THE PRINCE, "who was the founder of modern political thought. Niccolò Machiavelli's works on the theory and practice of statecraft are classics, but Viroli sugggest's that his greatest accomplishment is his robust philosophy of life -- his deep beliefs about how one should conduct oneself as a modern citizen in a republic, as a responsible family member, as a good person. On these subjects Machiavelli wrote no books: the text of his philosophy is his life itself, a life that was filled with paradox, uncertainty, and tragic drama."

Book: Maurizio Viroli (trans. Anthony Shugar), Niccolo's Smile: A Biography of Machiavellii; Niccolo Machiavellii, The Prince

 

Gates Mills Community House | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

 

Thursdays, January 18-March 8 | 10:30 a.m.-noon

 

Jim Lane, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

“We have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it,” claims lawyer and author Michelle Alexander. In this book discussion course, students examine the arguments and data Alexander presents to defend her thesis. She argues that our current criminal justice system is an oppressive reality that is played out in a mighty human drama with important consequences for African-Americans and for our entire society. Book: The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, Michelle Alexander

 

Cleveland Skating Club | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

Mondays, January 22-March 12 | 10:30-noon


Barbara Greenberg, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

Jodi Picoult’s novel Small Great Things focuses on racial tensions in a small hospital that flood out into the larger community. Using this book as our central theme, our classes will discuss the wide range of discrimination in our country today, and whether legislation, including the Civil Rights Act of 1964, has made any difference in America up to now and what the implications are for the future. Are we the same as we were?

Book: Jodi Picoult, Small Great Things

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

 

Fridays, January 19-March 9 | 10–11:30 a.m.

 

Pamela Belknap, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

As a young social worker, Frances Perkins witnessed the traumatic Triangle Shirtwaist fire of 1911, which killed 146 workers. She immediately became an activist, as well as a lifelong advocate for critical reforms and programs. Learn how Labor Secretary Perkins teamed with FDR to create the New Deal legislation, which continues today.

Books: The Woman Behind the New Deal – The Life and Legacy of Frances Perkins – Social Security, Unemployment Insurance, and the Minimum Wage, Kirstin Downey; The Roosevelt I Knew, Frances Perkins (Penguin Classics)

 

Judson Park | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

Thursdays, January 25-March 15 | 10:30 a.m.-noon

 

Jim Van Horn, Leader-Teacher, Off Campus Studies

 

One hundred thousand years ago at least six species inhabited earth. Today, just one. Us. Homo Sapiens. How did our species succeed in the battle for dominance? Create cities and kingdoms?

How did we come to believe in gods, nations, human rights; to trust money, books, laws; and to be enslaved (interesting word, no?) by bureaucracy, timetables, and consumerism? Harari doesn't miss a trick: Cognitive, Agricultural, and Scientific Revolutions. And what will become of us?

Book: Yuval Noah Harari, Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind

 

Hamlet Village Clubhouse | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

 

 

Sundays, March 18-May 6 | 5-6:30 p.m.

 

Charlene Miletti, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

Maurizio Viroli brings to life the fascinating writer of The Prince, who was the founder of modern political thought. Niccolò Machiavelli's works on the theory and practice of statecraft are classics, but Viroli suggests that his greatest accomplishment is his robust philosophy of life --his deep beliefs about how one should conduct oneself as a modern citizen in a republic, as a responsible family member, as a good person. On these subjects, Machiavelli wrote no books: the text of his philosophy is his life itself, a life that was filled with paradox, uncertainty, and tragic drama.

Books: Niccolo's Smile: A Biography of Machiavelli, Maurizio Viroli (trans. Anthony Shugar); The Prince, Niccolo Machiavelli,

 

Private Residence - 13803 Cormere Ave., Cleveland 44120 | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

 

Mondays, March 19-May 7 | 10:30 a.m.-noon

Whitney Lloyd, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

McCullough’s biography of Harry S. Truman explores the life of the accidental president, who was the architect of the Cold War and an innovative reformer.

Book: Truman, David McCullough

 

South Franklin Circle | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

Mondays, March 19-May 7 | 1-2:30 p.m.

 

Jim Lane, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

Delve into the realms of science, mythology, spirituality, appearance, illusion, and reality as they apply to our place in the natural world. The two novels we will read explore profound personal, societal, philosophical and religious questions.  Books: Siddhartha, Herman Hesse; Ishmael, Daniel Quinn

 

Gates Mills Community House | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

Tuesdays, March 20-May 8 | 1-2:30 p.m.

 

Jim Lane, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

Put on your bell-bottoms and grab your granny glasses, tie-dyes and beads! Let’s do a little back-to-the-future time travel to the seminal decade of the 1960s. Utilizing a compilation of articles originally published in the New Yorker, we will re-examine the confrontations over civil rights, economics, Vietnam, and lifestyles. We will review the tragedies of the all too common assassinations and the problems and promises of psychedelics and protests. We will re-experience the highs of Telstar and Apollo 11 and the lows of poverty in The Other America and of the damage echoed in The Silent Spring. And we will review our fascination with the entertainment and cultural icons of the era.  Book: The 60s: The Story Of A Decade, The New Yorker (Henry Finder, editor)

 

Judson Manor | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

 

Tuesdays, March 20-May 8 | 7:30-9 p.m.


Barbara Greenberg, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

Jodi Picoult’s novel Small Great Things focuses on racial tensions in a small hospital that flood out into the larger community. Using this book as our central theme, our classes will discuss the wide range of discrimination in our country today, and whether legislation, including the Civil Rights Act of 1964, has made any difference in America up to now and what the implications are for the future. Are we the same as we were?

Book: Jodi Picoult, Small Great Things

 

First Unitarian Church | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

 

Thursdays, March 22-May 10 | 10-11:30 a.m.

 

Barbara Parr, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

This book discussion course examines George Orwell’s classic 1984, which is, perhaps, more relevant today than it was when published in 1948. Discussions focus on the literary merit of the novel as well as the cultural, philosophical, and political topics Orwell includes. The course also examines Animal Farm, apolical allegory and brilliant satire.

Books: G. Orwell, 1984 and Animal Farm

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

Thursdays, March 22-May 10 | 2-3:30 p.m.


Sol Factor, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

The team of Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II totally changed the American Musical both in structure and also how difficult subject matter was to be presented. They were not afraid to deal with subject matter ranging from inter-racial relationships, abusive husbands, racial prejudices, to Nazi takeovers. Throughout their musicals, they always taught us that in the darkest times there was always hope. We will examine seven musicals; six written by Rodgers and Hammerstein, and one, Showboat, written by Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein II.

Book: The Sound of their Music: The Story of Rodgers and Hammerstein, Frederick Nolan. In addition, CD and DVD selections will highlight the musicals.

 
Hamlet Village Clubhouse | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $87 | REGISTER >

 

Fridays, March 23-May 11 | 10-11:30 a.m.

 

Jim Van Horn, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

One hundred thousand years ago at least six species inhabited earth. Today, just one. Us. Homo Sapiens. How did our species succeed in the battle for dominance? Create cities and kingdoms?

How did we come to believe in gods, nations, human rights; to trust money, books, laws; and to be enslaved (interesting word, no?) by bureaucracy, timetables, and consumerism? Harari doesn't miss a trick: Cognitive, Agricultural, and Scientific Revolutions. And what will become of us?

Book: Yuval Noah Harari, Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind

 

Judson Park | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

 

 

Fridays, March 23-May 11 | 10:30 a.m.-noon

 

Joe KonenLeader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

This book offers us a vehicle for a nuanced understanding of Islam. Carla Power, a Western reporter who grew up in several predominantly Muslim countries, writes of her dialogues with prominent India-born and now London-based Sheikh Mohammad Akram Nadwi. The dialogue enlightens us on a nonviolent understanding of Islam. The Sheik shows us how he distinguishes between culture and politics on the one hand and religion and spirituality on the other. Book: If the Oceans Were Ink: An Unlikely Friendship and a Journey to the Heart of the Quran, Carla Power (2015).


St. Paul's Episcopal Church | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

 

Off-Campus Studies is a program offered in collaboration with the Association for Continuing Education (ACE). It began in 1947 as Living Room Learning, developed by Grazella Shepherd at Cleveland College who encouraged the Women’s Association, predecessor of ACE, to help design and promote classes. Courses are eight weeks long and meet for 1.5 hours per class in locations throughout greater Cleveland. There are no written assignments or exams, but rather the classes provide an open environment for lively discussion based on meaningful examination of shared texts. Leader-Teachers facilitate the discussion and provide academic background and context. Off-Campus Studies is unique among continuing education programs because it is organized in collaboration with its participants. Designated Class Coordinators volunteer to serve as the liaison between the office and the study groups. The discussion groups select the courses with the help of the class coordinator and the office. Participation is open to everyone and groups welcome new members with enthusiasm. New groups are welcome. Please call 216.368.2090 to establish a study group in your neighborhood. Sessions require a minimum of 10 participants.

West Side Courses

Mondays, January 15-March 5 | 10:30 a.m.-noon

 

Jim Lane, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

Put on your bell-bottoms and grab your granny glasses, tie-dyes and beads! Let’s do a little back-to-the-future time travel to the seminal decade of the 1960s. Utilizing a compilation of articles originally published in the New Yorker, we will re-examine the confrontations over civil rights, economics, Vietnam, and lifestyles. We will review the tragedies of the all too common assassinations and the problems and promises of psychedelics and protests. We will re-experience the highs of Telstar and Apollo 11 and the lows of poverty in The Other America and of the damage echoed in The Silent Spring. And we will review our fascination with the entertainment and cultural icons of the era.  Book: The 60s: The Story Of A Decade, The New Yorker (Henry Finder, editor)

 

Bay United Methodist Church | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

 

Mondays, January 15-March 5 | 1-2:30 p.m.
 

Terry Meehan, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

Three of the top espionage writers of the mid-twentieth century were well acquainted with the secret world of spycraft. Both Ian Fleming and John le Carré were spooks for British Intelligence, while Len Deighton lived next door to Anna Wolkoff a Nazi mole whose arrest he witnessed. Three of their best novels have been adapted to the screen, resulting in movies that are highly regarded by audiences, critics and even grumpy ex-spies.

We will begin with a lively discussion of the novel itself followed by a screening of its film adaptation. Then we’ll take a close look at how successfully the filmmaker transformed the book’s ideas and characters into cinema.

Books and Movies: Ian Fleming, From Russia with Love, Film directed by Terence Young (1963); Len Deighton, The Ipcress File, Film directed by Sidney J. Furie (1965); John le Carré, The Spy Who Came in from the Cold, Film directed by Martin Ritt (1965)

 

Rocky River Public Library | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

Thursdays, January 18-March 8 | 10-11:30 a.m.

 

Pamela Belknap, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

Two new biographies present fresh, contemporary perspectives on hero Winston Churchill and his wife, Clementine, who was indispensable to his life and important to Great Britain. Discuss their unique personalities, fascinating marriage, and critical contributions to their nation. Compare and contrast with the lives of the Roosevelts.


Books: Boris Johnson, The Churchill Factor: How One Man Made History; Sonia Purnell, Clementine: The Life of Mrs. Winston Churchill

 

Middleburg Heights United Church of Christ | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

Mondays, March 19-May 7 | 10-11:30 a.m.


Barbara Greenberg, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

Jodi Picoult’s novel Small Great Things focuses on racial tensions in a small hospital that flood out into the larger community. Using this book as our central theme, our classes will discuss the wide range of discrimination in our country today, and whether legislation, including the Civil Rights Act of 1964, has made any difference in America up to now and what the implications are for the future. Are we the same as we were?

Book: Jodi Picoult, Small Great Things

 

Bay United Methodist Church | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

 

Mondays, March 19-May 7 | 1-2:30 p.m.

 

Barbara ParrLeader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

This book discussion course examines George Orwell’s classic 1984, which is, perhaps, more relevant today than it was when published in 1948. Discussions focus on the literary merit of the novel as well as the cultural, philosophical, and political topics Orwell includes. The course also examines Animal Farm, apolical allegory and brilliant satire.

Books: G. Orwell, 1984 and Animal Farm

 

Rocky River Library | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

Tuesdays, March 20-May 8 | 10-11:30 a.m.

 

Bill Pennington, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

Obviously, this 100-year-old classic by British author Kenneth Grahame appeals to all generations. But according to two, recently-published, annotated versions and an Oxford World Classics special edition, The Wind in the Willows was really written for adults.

While we take this fun ride again (or for the first time), we will study and discuss how this enlightening and enriching book came to life; what are some of it’s hidden meanings; what makes it a classic; and what’s in it for us in 2017?

Book: Kenneth Grahame (Seth Lerer, Editor), The Wind in the Willows: An Annotated Edition

 

Lakewood United Methodist Church | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

 

Thursdays, March 22-May 10 | 10–11:30 a.m.

 

Cheryl Wires, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

T.S. Eliot praised The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins as “the first…and the best of modern English detective novels.” Literary critics concur, crediting Collins, along with Edgar Allan Poe, with creating the detective genre. The moonstone, a sacred diamond stolen from an Indian shrine and bequeathed to a beautiful young woman, mysteriously disappears from her English country house. Collins, writing in 1868, developed a number of elements, which have become popular conventions in contemporary detective fiction.

Books: Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone; Andre Lycett, Wilkie Collins: A Life of Sensation (selected chapters)

 

Westlake United Methodist Church | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

Thursdays, March 22-May 10 | 10-11:30 a.m.

 

Bill Pennington, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

Obviously, this 100-year-old classic by British author Kenneth Grahame appeals to all generations. But according to two, recently-published, annotated versions and an Oxford World Classics special edition, The Wind in the Willows was really written for adults.

While we take this fun ride again (or for the first time), we will study and discuss how this enlightening and enriching book came to life; what are some of it’s hidden meanings; what makes it a classic; and what’s in it for us in 2017?

Book: Kenneth Grahame (Seth Lerer, Editor), The Wind in the Willows: An Annotated Edition

 

Middleburg Heights United Church of Christ | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER > 

South Side Courses

Tuesdays, January 16-March 6 | 1–2:30 p.m.


Joseph Jacoby, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

In this book discussion course, participants examine English novelists who are profoundly interested in issues of ethics and morality. Iris Murdoch's classic work examines a group of well-intentioned, but muddled idealists in the Gloucestershire countryside. The past collides with the present in Julian Barnes' novel about the tragic death of an intimate friend. Ian McEwan's newly published novel explores the clash of religious and secular world views in the law courts of contemporary London.

Books: The Bell, I. Murdoch; The Sense of an Ending, J. Barnes; The Children Act, I. McEwan

 

Private Residence: 6814 Rosemont Ave., Brecksville 44141 | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

 

Tuesdays, January 23-March 13 | 10-11:30 a.m.


Barbara Greenberg, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

In Our Defense by Caroline Kennedy and Ellen Alderman is a primer about the Bill of Rights. Each chapter focuses on one of the first ten amendments of the United States Constitution, using an actual case to study the issues surrounding that amendment.

Each week, students will review one chapter, one amendment and one case, discussing the laws that have developed from those facts. The class will use each case as the springboard for a discussion about how and why laws change, current laws focusing on that amendment and how constitutional amendments and the cases that follow those protected rights affect our daily lives.

Book: In Our Defense, Caroline Kennedy and Ellen Alderman

 

Brecksville United Church of Christ | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

Tuesdays, March 20-May 8 | 10-11:30 a.m.

 

Joe KonenLeader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

The story of the gene is one of the great mystery narratives of science. In this book, Pulitzer Prize-winning author, Siddhartha Mukherjee, weaves together the history of genetics with his family’s history of mental illness. He looks backward to follow humanity’s growing ability to “read” the human genome from Mendel through Morgan and Hunt to the Human Genome Project. He also looks forward with ethical and human questions about which of the possible experiments with “writing” human genetic code we really want to pursue. Our reading and discussion will help develop our scientific literacy around genetics and will challenge us with the ethical dilemmas raised by recent breakthroughs in genetic modification.

Book: The Gene: An Intimate History, Siddhartha Mukherjee (May 2016)

 

Brecksville United Church of Christ | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

Wednesdays, March 21-May 9 | 10–11:30 a.m.


Betty Zak, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies


The Vatican and others called her a Pirate Queen and a master of the spies as she transformed England into an imposing empire. Discover her power and intrigue, her swashbuckling mariners who terrorized the seas and the brilliance of a spymaster who exploited double agents, deciphered codes, and laid a foundation for international espionage. 

Books: Susan Ronald, The Pirate Queen: Queen Elizabeth I, Her Pirate Adventures, and the Dawn of an EmpireStephen Budiansky, Her Majesty's Spymaster.

 

Rosemont Country Club | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >

 

Thursdays, March 22-May 10 | 1:30-3 p.m.
 

Charlene MiletiLeader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies

 

In the fifth century, Athens, Greece, was a burgeoning democracy, the first of its kind to exist in human history. Born in 494 BCE, Pericles of Athens would rise to become one of the city's most beloved leaders. While Pericles' astute grasp of military and political affairs would place him at the head of Athens' government, he is, nonetheless, more memorably remembered as the tutelary leader of the city. Contrasted with our modern democracies, Pericles' government functioned as the primary source for educating the citizenry in matters of civic and personal virtue. After his death, Athens would never again flourish as it did during Pericles' leadership. Book: Pericles of Athens and the Birth of Democracy, D. Kagan

 

Laurel Lake Community Room | Lifelong Learning Members: $82; Nonmembers: $97 | REGISTER >