AFFLUENCE ANXIETY: JEWISH UPWARD MOBILITY IN MIDCENTURY AMERICA (IN-PERSON)

Lecturer(s)
Rachel Kranson
Associate Professor of Religious Studies and the Director of Jewish Studies at the University of Pittsburgh
Date
Friday March 10
Time
noon-1:30 p.m. ET

In the decades just after World War II, many American Jews enjoyed rapid upward mobility. But instead of celebrating their economic rise, many rabbis, writers and Jewish intellectuals expressed concern that Jewish life could not survive the move to the middle class suburbs. This talk will examine this undercurrent of anxiety, and what it revealed about the hopes, fears and ambitions of American Jews in the middle of the 20th century. This talk is based on Kranson’s book Ambivalent Embrace: Jewish Upward Mobility in Postwar America.
 

Jewish Studies programming is supported by the Fund for the Jewish Future of the Jewish Federation of Cleveland, and The Laura and Alvin Siegal College of Judaic Studies Educational Foundation, a supporting foundation of the Jewish Federation of Cleveland.

Member of Lifelong Learning Cost
Free
Nonmember Cost
$5

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Click here for information on Rachel Kranson's lecture on AMERICAN JEWS, ABORTION, AND THE FIRST AMENDMENT (IN-PERSON AND REMOTE).