MIRIAM SCHAPIRO, LEADER OF FEMINIST ART: HER ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND HER JEWISH IDENTITY (IN-PERSON)

Lecturer(s)
Carol Salus
Professor Emeritus, Art History, Kent State University
Date
Wednesday August 23
Time
noon–1:30 p.m. ET

Miriam Schapiro was an artist, educator and co-founder of the nation’s first Feminist Art Program at Cal Tech. Because of her work to promote the importance of women in visual arts, she came to be called the Johnny Appleseed of the field. Although Schapiro’s early paintings were marked by hard-edge abstraction which followed the Minimalist movement, she rebelled against this sterility and adopted materials and content that connected to female lives. Femmage was the term she coined in the mid-1970s to identify the collaging of materials such as rickrack, embroidery, handkerchiefs, lace and other textiles which were previously considered outside the realm of serious art making. This talk will explore femmages relating to her Jewish heritage, including works dedicated to Jewish painter/fashion designer Sonia Delaunay, Frida Kahlo and her “alleged” Jewish background, and Anne Frank.
 

Member of Lifelong Learning Cost
$0
Nonmember Cost
$0