SUPERSTITION AND SCIENCE: ECLIPSES IN THE GRECO-ROMAN WORLD (IN-PERSON)

Lecturer(s)
John Sarkissian
Professor Emeritus, Classics, Youngstown State University
Date
Thursday April 04
Time
10:00 AM to 11:30 AM ET

As an eclipse comes over Northeast Ohio on April 8th, this lecture will examine examples of eclipses in ancient Greek and Latin literature. Among philosophers, Thales was said to have predicted the eclipse of May 585 BCE and Anaxagoras (5th Century BCE) accurately explained the causes. Nevertheless, superstitions about eclipses persisted in the Greco-Roman world, and the historians Herodotus, Thucydides, Livy and Tacitus describe the effects they had on people. This presentation will survey what the ancients had to say about these natural phenomena.

Member of Lifelong Learning Cost
Members receive $5 discount
Nonmember Cost
$10