Israel Then and Now

We are proud to announce the collaboration of two of Jewish Cleveland’s great educational and cultural institutions: Case Western Reserve University’s Siegal Lifelong Learning Program and The Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage for 2018-2019 programming.  

In partnership, we have organized a full season of dynamic Israel programs designed to engage, enrich, and educate.  Meet our visiting scholars, join us for an Israeli documentary film series, and take part in Israeli play readings.

  • Events will be held at alternating venues
  • See program listings below
  • Discounted rates are available for members of CWRU-Siegal or the Maltz
  • Register online or by phone through Siegal Lifelong Learning or through the Maltz Museum at maltzmuseum.org or by phone at 216.593.0575 
Lecturer(s):
Alan Dowty
October 31, 2018|7 p.m.

The conflict between Israelis and Palestinians has passed through three major stages since its origins in nineteenth-century Ottoman Turkey: from a collision between two communities in Palestine, to an interstate conflict between Israel and Arab states, to the re-emergence of the Palestinians as major actors opposite Israel.

Lecturer(s):
Ruby Namdar
November 15, 2018|7 p.m.

Winner of Israel’s 2014 Sapir Prize, The Ruined House interweaves imaginative Talmudic texts and graphics with depictions of contemporary Jewish life.

Lecturer(s):
Ruby Namdar
November 16, 2018|10-11:30 a.m.

Eighteen years ago, Israeli author Ruby Namdar arrived in New York, not knowing that he had just taken the first step of an incredible literary, cultural and personal journey. Namdar's award-winning novel, The Ruined House, was his artistic response to that journey.

Lecturer(s):
Yael Aronoff
November 18, 2018|7 p.m.

This talk reflects on the lessons learned from Israel's three wars with Hamas in 1968, 2012, and 2014 and the tensions that continue today.

Lecturer(s):
Ari Ariel
November 28, 2018|7 p.m.

Food is for eating. But it also provides a vehicle for expressing ethnic pride and national identity. Sometimes food articulates conflict. And other times it serves to foster coexistence.

Lecturer(s):
Ari Ariel
November 29, 2018|10-11:30 a.m.

Jews began leaving Yemen to immigrate to Ottoman Palestine (later Israel) as early as the 1880s, and their migration continued until recent years.