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Siegal Lifelong Learning

Origins Science Scholars

Origins Science Scholars

The Origins Science Scholars Program is presented by Siegal Lifelong Learning and the Institute for the Science of Origins (ISO), a partnership of several Northeast Ohio research and educational institutions, led by Case Western Reserve University.

In this unique program, members of the community engage with each other and with leading scholars to investigate rapidly developing areas of origins science. Each evening begins with a presentation by a world-class researcher, followed by complimentary dinner and open discussion among all of the participants.

Asteroids

During this unique program, community members engage with one another and with leading scholars to investigate rapidly developing areas of origins science. Each evening begins with a presentation by a world-class researcher, followed by complimentary dinner and open discussion among all the participants.

Program Schedule:
5:30: Coffee and Sign-in
6:00- 7:00: Lectures 
7:00-7:30: Dinner with faculty and fellows 
7:30: Q&A and dessert 
(Parking is included)

Tuesday, 
October 24 

Glenn Starkman, Professor of Physics, CWRU
What’s left to learn from particle accelerators?
For almost one hundred years, we have built ever larger particle accelerators in order to probe shorter and shorter distances, with ever higher energy probes. With the discovery of the Higgs boson at the LHC, we have completed the Standard Model of particle physics. What's left to learn, and can we learn it from even bigger accelerators?

Location: Cleveland Museum of Natural History

Tuesday, October 31
Cyrus Taylor, Dean and Professor in Physics, CWRU
Particle Detectors: Modern Cathedrals
The detectors at modern particle accelerators are awe inspiring masterpieces of engineering weighing thousands of tons and requiring the coordinated effort of thousands of scientists and engineers at hundreds of universities and laboratories around the world. How do they work, how are they designed, built and operated?

Location: CWRU, Tinkham Veale University Center

Tuesday, November 7
Mike Martens, Professor of Physics, CWRU
Particle Accelerators: The World's Largest Machines
Particle accelerators began almost a century ago as table-top apparatuses, and are now the world's largest machines, tens of miles long, crossing international borders, requiring whole power plants to operate.

Location: Cleveland Museum of Natural History

 

The Mind-Body Connection sessions are presented in collaboration with the Emeriti Academy of Case Western Reserve University and the department of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science.


Tuesday, November 14
Morris Moscovitch, Max and Gianna Glassman Chair in Neuropsychology and Aging, Department of Psychology, University of Toronto

The Mind-Body Connection: Part I; Memory and the Brain: Past, Present, and Future
Memory for specific life experiences is characterized by recollection of the flow of events in time and space that compose specific episodes, and this ability depends on a brain area called the hippocampus. I will describe recent complementary evidence of “time cells” in the hippocampus that encode sequential moments in temporally structured experiences. Furthermore, networks of time cells represent the temporal organization of specific memories and predict memory success. In addition, we have traced the origin of timing signals to a cortical area that also carries signals about space to the hippocampus. Taken together, these findings support an emerging view that the hippocampus serves memory by mapping the organization of events within their temporal and spatial context, and to connect related memories in the building of knowledge. This capacity to map memories supports our ability to use memory for planning and insight in everyday life challenges.

Location: Tinkham Veale University Center

Tuesday, November 21

Michael Lewicki, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, CWRU and Ken Loparo, Professor of Engineering and Chairman, CWRU 
The Mind-Body Connection: Part II; 
Is the Evolution of Perception Computational?  
The brain's interpretation of sensory info results in representation and understanding of the environment. Perception isn't passive, it’s shaped by learning, memory, expectation, and attention.  It's evolution is the subject of considerable controversy. Can theories of optimality explain the codes biological systems use?  Dr. Lewicki will argue that computational principles explain how neural codes are optimally adapted to their sensory environment. Further, it is possible to extend these theories to provide functional theories for higher-level aspects of perception. 

Location: Tinkham Veale University Center

Tuesday, November 28
Roberto F. Galán and Ken Loparo, Professor of Engineering and Chairman, CWRU
The Mind-Body Connection: Part III; Making sense out of noise in neural circuits.
Neural circuits are subject to sources of variability akin to static noise in electrical circuits. I will present several examples from my research, showing that unlike man-made devices, neural circuits have adapted not only to cope with different levels of noise but also to take advantage of that intrinsic variability and uncertainty to encode information, modulate neuronal activity, and transform behavior.

Location: Tinkham Veale University Center

Tuesday, December 5
Darin Croft
Global Climate Change Past and Present
Are humans causing global climate change? Or is nature cycling the planet toward a heat wave, just as it has had periods of heat and ice ages in the recent and distant past?  The geologic record & earth dynamics explain the difference between the glacially slow climate change of the past vs today's radically-accelerated changes. In fact, the mechanics of it are pretty simple. Geologists understand very well what makes the earth hot and cold -today, and throughout the 4.5 billion year history of the planet. And they know the effects climate change has had on the planet's inhabitants: the most common response of species to major environmental change is extinction. Participants will come away with a better understanding of the science involved, quite apart from the thorny questions of policy. However, the good news is that newly-emerging markets are making huge gains in clean energy, which not only curbs pollution but simultaneously helps counter climate change. Solar panels and wind turbines are already providing thousands of new jobs in Ohio. 

Location: Cleveland Museum of Natural History



 

Lifelong Learning Members: $172 for full series; $40 per lecture | Nonmembers: $195 for full series; $48 per lecture.

(Friends of the Institute for the Science of Origins are eligible for member rate for this program.)

REGISTER FOR FULL SERIES >

Tuesday, November 21 | 5:30 p.m.

 

Michael Lewicki, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, CWRU and Ken Loparo, Professor of Engineering and Chairman, CWRU

 

The brain's interpretation of sensory info results in representation and understanding of the environment. Perception isn't passive, it’s shaped by learning, memory, expectation, and attention. It's evolution is the subject of considerable controversy. Can theories of optimality explain the codes biological systems use? Dr. Lewicki will argue that computational principles explain how neural codes are optimally adapted to their sensory environment. Further, it is possible to extend these theories to provide functional theories for higher-level aspects of perception.

 

Program Schedule:
5:30 p.m. – Coffee and Sign-In
6 p.m. – Lecture
7 p.m. – Dinner with OSS faculty and fellows
7:30 p.m. – Q&A and Dessert

 

Tinkham Veale University Center, CWRU campus | Lifelong Learning Members: $40; Nonmembers: $48 | REGISTER >

The Mind-Body Connection series is also sponsored by the Case Western Reserve University Emeriti Academy, an organization administered through the CWRU Office of the Provost, which is intended to foster closer continuing relationships with emeriti faculty after they retire from full-time employment.

 

Tuesday, November 28 | 5:30 p.m.

 

Roberto F. Galán, Assistant Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Ken Loparo, Professor of Engineering and Chairman, CWRU

 

Neural circuits are subject to sources of variability akin to static noise in electrical circuits. I will present several examples from my research, showing that unlike man-made devices, neural circuits have adapted not only to cope with different levels of noise but also to take advantage of that intrinsic variability and uncertainty to encode information, modulate neuronal activity, and transform behavior.

 

Program Schedule:
5:30 p.m. – Coffee and Sign-In
6 p.m. – Lecture
7 p.m. – Dinner with OSS faculty and fellows
7:30 p.m. – Q&A and Dessert

 

Tinkham Veale University Center, CWRU campus | Lifelong Learning Members: $40; Nonmembers: $48 | REGISTER >

The Mind-Body Connection series is also sponsored by the Case Western Reserve University Emeriti Academy, an organization administered through the CWRU Office of the Provost, which is intended to foster closer continuing relationships with emeriti faculty after they retire from full-time employment. 

Tuesday, December 5 | 5:30 p.m.

 

Darin Croft, Associate Professor, Department of Anatomy, CWRU School of Medicine

 

Are humans causing global climate change? Or is nature cycling the planet toward a heat wave, just as it has had periods of heat and ice ages in the recent and distant past? The geologic record & earth dynamics explain the difference between the glacially slow climate change of the past vs today's radically-accelerated changes. In fact, the mechanics of it are pretty simple. Geologists understand very well what makes the earth hot and cold -today, and throughout the 4.5 billion year history of the planet. And they know the effects climate change has had on the planet's inhabitants: the most common response of species to major environmental change is extinction.

Participants will come away with a better understanding of the science involved, quite apart from the thorny questions of policy. However, the good news is that newly-emerging markets are making huge gains in clean energy, which not only curbs pollution but simultaneously helps counter climate change. Solar panels and wind turbines are already providing thousands of new jobs in Ohio.

 

Program Schedule:
5:30 p.m. – Coffee and Sign-In
6 p.m. – Lecture
7 p.m. – Dinner with OSS faculty and fellows
7:30 p.m. – Q&A and Dessert

 

Cleveland Museum of Natural History | Lifelong Learning Members: $40; Nonmembers: $48 | REGISTER >