Probing nanoscopic and microscopic neurochemical activities for single cell analysis to brain mapping

Event Date:
November 8th 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Time: Nov 8, 2022, Tuesdays 2-3PM

Zoom Link: https://cmu.zoom.us/j/98074890148?pwd=akRhdnZzdWo1WWJQZTRyL0pxM283UT09

Passcode: 989260

 

Seminar Title: Probing nanoscopic and microscopic neurochemical activities for single cell analysis to brain mapping

Speaker: Brian N. Kim, PhD. 

Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering

University of Central Florida

 

Abstract: The human brain consists of complex neuronal networks that interact both electrically and neurochemically. Electrophysiology techniques, which have been the backbone of neuroscience research for decades, can measure the electrical signal (action potential and local field potentials); however, this approach is blind to neurochemical signaling (release and clearance), and therefore offer a partial image of the brain’s activity. In this talk, Dr. Kim will discuss his group’s efforts to probe the nanoscopic and microscopic neurochemical activities for both single-cell analysis and brain-scale mapping. He will also discuss his recent effort in developing a fully wireless, multimodal neural probe technology that can map both neural spike activities and neurochemical release/uptake with high spatiotemporal resolution.


About the Speaker: Dr. Kim’s research area includes multimodal neural interfaces, neurochemical sensors, single-cell electrophysiology, and medical diagnostic. He is a recipient of the prestigious NSF CAREER award in 2022. His research has been funded by competitive grants from sponsors, including NIH (R01 and R21), NSF (CAREER and regular awards), and DoD (Air Force Office of Scientific Research). Dr. Brian Kim is an Associate Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Central Florida. Prior to joining the university in 2016, he was a senior electrical engineer at Roche Diagnostics in Seattle. He completed his Ph.D. (2013) in Biophysics at the School of Applied and Engineering Physics at Cornell University, and he received his postdoctoral training (2014) in the Department of Bioengineering at the University of California, Berkeley.