Mental Health Resources

It's OK to not be OK right now. 

This situation can often be scary and sad and just plain awful. 

Anyone- students, staff, faculty- can benefit from additional support. 

Please know that we are here for you. Case Western Reserve is here for you. And, please be there for each other (which may lift your spirits, too). 

Our counselors welcome your calls. They want to help. If you are out of state, they will work to connect you with local options. 

We list the resources below to supplement the staff support being provided within the CWRU community. We hope you find an article that helps you make meaning, and app that brings you calm, or maybe just a site that provides a welcome distraction. 

First, though, always remember: If you are feeling particularly anxious or overwhelmed, you can reach a counselor 24/7: 

Students should contact University Counseling Services at 216.368.5872

Benefits-eligible faculty or staff members contact IMPACT SOLUTIONS at 1.800.227.6007. IMPACT solutions is a confidential and free counseling and referral program for benefits-eligible employees. To learn more, visit the CWRU Human Resources website

Resources for Coping

Recommended Apps

Apps without websites but available in the App Store or Google Play: 

  • CBT Thought Diary
  • Virtual Hope Box

Resources to Connect with Others

Virtual CWRU Events

Community Virtual Resources

Other Steps You Can Take

  • Take care of your mind. Constant searching, scrolling or consumption of coronavirus news can make students feel more anxious and afraid. Take breaks from media coverage and use this page for update rather than checking unreliable sites. 
  • Reach out to others. Reach out to others and offer support, empathy information and, if possible, tangible help. Stay connected using technology such as video chat, Zoom group calls, and cellphone texting and conversations. Personal relationships are crucial in maintaining perspective and elevating mood. 
  • Increase your feel-good activities. Whether mindfulness, talking to your friends and family members, going for walks, journaling, or watching Netflix, now is the time to increase positive experiences in your daily schedule. For a quick stress reliever, University Health and Counseling Services offers free guided meditations. 
  • Take care of your body. Eating healthy meals, exercising, getting at least seven hours of sleep a night, and limiting your alcohol consumption can help your immune system. Even while maintaining a safe distance from other people, you can still go outside! Regular exercise can reduce anxiety. 

If You Have to Self Isolate

Common Reactions: 

  • Anxiety, worry, or fear related to your own health status
  • Concern about effectively managing your life demands while choosing to isolate for your own safety and safety of others
  • Fear of Missing Out (FOMO) and loneliness associated with feeling cut off from the world and from friends and family
  • Stigmatized or singled-out
  • Anger and frustration because you may not be able to work or engage in regular day-to-day activities
  • Uncertainty or ambivalence about the situation

Also common, but worth considering a call to counseling for help: 

  • A desire to use unhealthy coping behaviors that interfere with normal sleeping, eating, and self-care behaviors such as excessive late nights, over-eating, and excessive use of substances. 
  • Symptoms of depression, such as feelings of hopelessness, changes in appetite, or sleeping too little or too much. 
  • Symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), such as intrusive distressing memories, flashbacks (reliving the event), nightmares, changes in thoughts and mood, and being easily startled
  • Stay connected daily
  • Ask about how the other person is doing
  • Note that feelings of anger, frustration, and/or worry are absolutely normal
  • Don't try to fix these feelings while also reminding them that you care about them and that this will pass
  • Remind them to engage in healthy routines such as regular sleep patterns, eating healthy, and adding variety to their daily activities. 
  • Stay positive

Common Reactions including feeling singled out and worried about how others may view and interact with you. We recommend: 

  • Talking to others about your experience and how you are feeling
  • Re-engaging in your daily routine: go to class, exercise, study, reconnect with others, etc... 
  • Seeking help if you feel distressed, anxious, depressed, and/or are having difficulty sleeping
  • Ask about the experience and feelings now
  • Express support and empathy
  • Suggest healthy routines such as regular sleep patterns, eating healthy, and engaging in more or other daily activities
  • Stay positive

And again, always remember, you can reach a counselor 24/7. 

Students should contact University Counseling Services at 216.368.5872

Benefits-eligible faculty or staff members should contact IMPACT Solutions at 1.800.227.6007. IMPACT Solutions is a confidential and free counseling and referral program for benefits-eligible employees. To learn more, visit the CWRU Human Resources website