Explore Recommendations by Major

With nearly 100 majors, minors and concentrations across a range of disciplines, you can specialize in practically anything at CWRU.

Below you can browse course recommendations by potential areas of study, and begin imagining your future at CWRU.

Enhance your critical-thinking, quantitative-analysis, and decision-making skills as you prepare for a career as a CPA - or any number of opportunities.


MATH: Course based on diagnostic score and incoming credit

  • Sequence options include: MATH 120, MATH 121 or 125
    • MATH 125 is recommended for students placing into Calculus I
    • Students considering other majors that require MATH 121 should enroll in MATH 121 instead.
  • If you have credit for MATH 121/125, you may choose to:
    • Register for computer programming (DESN 210, ENGR 131, or CSDS 132), statistics (OPRE 207), or Calculus II (MATH 122/126) in the first semester.
    • Defer taking computer programming, statistics or Calculus II until a later semester and replace with a different course of interest in the first semester instead.

ACCT 100: This course introduces students to the basics of financial, managerial and tax accounting and is a gateway course for students considering any major in Weatherhead School of Management.

Other courses for consideration: If there is room in schedule, students may wish to take one of the following:

  • ACCT 106: This 1-credit course is often taken in the second semester, but can be taken in the first semester if space in the schedule allows. Through this course, students will gain an understanding of how to create data models and how to use spreadsheet technology when resolving financial information-related questions.
  • ECON: Students can take ECON 102 (Principles of Microeconomics) or ECON 103 (Principles of Macroeconomics) in their first semester
  • MGMT 201: This course is designed to survey business topics, issues and practice. Students will be introduced to each of the functional areas of business.

Launch your career in aircraft and spacecraft development by gaining a solid background in mathematics, science and engineering.


Math course: Students should take a math course in their first semester based on math diagnostic score and incoming credit

  • Options include: MATH 120/121/122/223/224

Chemistry, Physics or Programming course: Courses are listed in order of importance

  • CHEM 111 is recommended for the first semester
    • Students with incoming CHEM 111 credit may choose to take the next course in the sequence (ENGR 145) or a different course.
  • PHYS 121 (or higher based on incoming credit) is recommended for the first semester.
  • ENGR 130 is recommended for students who:
    • Take MATH 120 in the first semester
    • Have PHYS 121 credit and defer PHYS 122 to the second semester
  • Students with complementary interests in computer science should take CSDS 132 instead of ENGR 130. 

Understand the connections among human behavior, institutions, and biology as you prepare for a wide range of careers, from health to public service.


Program notes: Four concentrations are available within the anthropology major including general anthropology, medical anthropology, archaeology and biological anthropology.

Major-specific course:

  • Students pursuing an anthropology major should consider enrolling in ANTH 102 or 103 during their first semester. However, students interested in multiple areas of study can push this to the second semester.
  • Students interested in archaeology may want to consider ANTH 107.
  • Students interested in medical anthropology may want to consider ANTH 215.
  • Students should wait until their second year for 300-400 level courses.

Through the power of mathematics, you can create models that allow you to analyze and help solve real-world problems across a wide range of fields.


Math course: Students should take a math course in their first semester based on math diagnostic score and incoming credit

  • Options include: MATH 120/121/122/223/224

Physics course: Students may take a physics course based on incoming credit in the following sequence

  • PHYS 121/122/221

Science sequence: In place of physics, students may opt to begin their science sequence

  • Options for the first course in the sequence include:
    • ASTR 101
    • CHEM 105
    • CHEM 111
    • EEPS 110
    • EEPS 210
  • Students with AP credit for the first course in the sequence may continue to the second course in their science sequence, or defer their science course to a later semester.

Take classes in one of America's best museums—right in your backyard. You'll study up close impressive collections from throughout the years.


Major-specific course:

  • Prospective art history majors should take ARTH 101 and 102 as soon as possible. Students do not earn credit for ARTH 101 or 102 through the AP Art History exam. 
  • While all 200 and 300-level ARTH courses are open without prerequisites, most are taught at an advanced level and students are encouraged to start with 100 and 200-level courses.

Study the global and regional impact of Asian cultures as you explore the intricacies of their social, cultural and political perspectives.


Major-specific requirements: Students are encouraged to begin their language study in Chinese or Japanese, and should follow the guidelines from the department.

Our astronomy programs are led by engaged faculty committed to getting all students active in research, from galaxy formations to telescope design.


Math course: Students should take a math course in their first semester based on math diagnostic score and incoming credit

  • Options include: MATH 120/121/122/223/224

Physics course:

  • Students should take PHYS 121 with MATH 121 (or higher) in their first semester; students should not advance to PHYS 122 unless they are also at the MATH 122 level or higher.
  • Students who place into MATH 120 via the math diagnostic should take ENGR 131 in the first semester and PHYS 121 in the second semester.

Programming course:

  • ENGR 131 is the preferred programming course for astronomy majors.
  • Students who are considering a major or minor that requires CSDS 132 may substitute it for the ENGR 131 requirement.

Discover how biology and chemistry intersect as you become a highly trained scientist who can have a major impact on solving public health issues.


BIOC 101: This optional 1-credit course is recommended for students considering the biochemistry major.

Chemistry sequence:

  • Options include CHEM 105 and 106 based on incoming credit.
  • CHEM 113 (lab component, if schedule allows)
  • Students who are also considering an alternate major that requires the CHEM 111 and ENGR 145 sequence may substitute these courses for the CHEM 105 and 106 requirement.

Biology 214 and 214L (lab): 

  • This course is offered both fall and spring, so can be deferred if a student is exploring an additional major of interest.
  • Students with AP/IB biology credit are still required to take these courses.
  • Students should register for both the lecture (BIOL 214) and lab (BIOL 214L).

Math course:

  • The BA in biochemistry requires the MATH 125/126 sequence.
  • The BS requires the MATH 121/122/223/224 sequence.
  • Students who place in MATH 120 should take MATH 120 in the first semester and then proceed in either of the above two sequences.
  • Students who are uncertain whether they will pursue the BA or BS should follow the BS recommendations.

Through partnerships across campus and our city, you’ll study and conduct hands-on research on anything from animal behavior to plant biotechnology.


Math course:

  • The BA and BS options both require the MATH 125/126 sequence.
  • Students considering an alternate major that require the MATH 121/122 sequence can substitute these courses for the 125/126 sequence.
  • Students who place in MATH 120 should take MATH 120 in the first semester and then proceed in either of the above two sequences.

Chemistry sequence:

  • Options include CHEM 105 and 106 based on incoming credit.
  • CHEM 113 (lab component, if schedule allows)
  • Students who are also considering an alternate major that requires the CHEM 111 and ENGR 145 sequence may substitute these courses for the CHEM 105 and 106 requirement.

Biology 214 and 214L (lab): 

  • This course is offered both fall and spring, so can be deferred if a student is exploring an additional major of interest.
  • Students with AP/IB biology credit are still required to take these courses.
  • Students should register for both the lecture (BIOL 214) and lab (BIOL 214L).

Learn to combine medicine and engineering as you create and bring to market technologies, devices and therapies that save and enhance lives worldwide.


Math course: Students should take a math course in their first semester based on math diagnostic score and incoming credit

  • Options include: MATH 120/121/122/223/224

Specialty tracks: Students should take a science or programming course based on their anticipated specialty track

  • Biomaterials: Take CHEM 111 in the first semester  
  • Biomechanics: Students should take PHYS 121 as early as possible
  • Computation and Analysis: Students should take CSDS 132 (Java) in the first semester
  • Devices (Electrical): Students should begin their PHYS 121/122 sequence as early as possible

Programming course (if schedule allows):

  • ENGR 130 is recommended for most students because of its application to the BME curriculum
  • Students who have complementary interests in computer science or who plan to pursue the computation and analysis track (see above) should take CSDS 132 instead of ENGR 130

EBME 105: This optional course provides students with information about the BME tracks. It is recommended for students who are exploring the major and/or are unsure of which track they would like to pursue. Opportunities for participation in research and design projects are described.

Build your foundation in economics, accounting, statistics, health care management, leadership, marketing, business information technology and supply chain management to prepare for a career in any field.


MATH: Course based on diagnostic score and incoming credit

  • Sequence options include: MATH 120, MATH 121 or 125
    • MATH 125 is recommended for students placing into Calculus I
    • Students considering other majors that require MATH 121 should enroll in MATH 121 instead.
  • If you have credit for MATH 121/125, you may choose to:
    • Register for computer programming (DESN 210, ENGR 131, or CSDS 132), statistics (OPRE 207), or Calculus II (MATH 122/126) in the first semester.
    • Defer taking computer programming, statistics or Calculus II until a later semester and replace with a different course of interest in the first semester instead.

ACCT 100: This course introduces students to the basics of financial, managerial and tax accounting and is a gateway course for students considering any major in Weatherhead School of Management.

Other courses for consideration: If there is room in schedule, students may wish to take one of the following:

  • ECON: Students can take ECON 102 (Principles of Microeconomics) or ECON 103 (Principles of Macroeconomics) in their first semester
  • MGMT 201: This course is designed to survey business topics, issues and practice. Students will be introduced to each of the functional areas of business.

How can chemistry solve biological questions? In our program, you'll study small molecules to understand the fundamental aspects of living systems.


Chemistry sequence:

  • Options include CHEM 105 and 106 based on incoming credit.
  • CHEM 113 (lab component, recommended for first semester if schedule allows)
  • Students who are also considering an alternate major that requires the CHEM 111 and ENGR 145 sequence may substitute these courses for the CHEM 105 and 106 requirement.

Math course:

  • The MATH 125/126 sequence is recommended.
  • Students considering an alternate major that require the MATH 121/122 sequence can substitute these courses for the 125/126 sequence.
  • Students who place in MATH 120 should take MATH 120 in the first semester and then proceed in either of the above two sequences.

Biology 214 and 214L (lab): 

  • This course is offered both fall and spring, so can be deferred if a student is exploring an additional major of interest.
  • Students with AP/IB biology credit are still required to take these courses.
  • Students should register for both the lecture (BIOL 214) and lab (BIOL 214L).

Discover how to transform raw materials into useful products and energy as you learn processes that affect engineering, from the atomic level to mega-scale manufacturing.


ECHE 151: This course serves as an introduction to the profession of chemical engineering, and the academic programs and curricular enhancements available to students majoring in chemical engineering at CWRU.  This is a required course for students majoring in Chemical Engineering.

Math course: Students should take a math course in their first semester based on math diagnostic score and incoming credit

  • Options include: MATH 120/121/122/223/224

Chemistry, Physics or Programming course: Courses are listed in order of importance

  • Options include: CHEM 111 or ENGR 145
  • If schedule allows, students may take PHYS 121 in the first semester.
  • Students taking MATH 120 should take ENGR 130 in the first semester and defer PHYS 121 to the second semester.
  • Students who have complementary interests in computer science should take CSDS 132 instead of ENGR 130.

Get ready to solve today's problems as a chemist—or in one of many related careers. Here, we cover everything from biochem to interstellar chemistry.


Chemistry sequence:

  • Options include CHEM 105 and 106 based on incoming credit.
  • CHEM 113 (lab component, recommended for first semester if schedule allows)
  • Students who are also considering an alternate major that requires the CHEM 111 and ENGR 145 sequence may substitute these courses for the CHEM 105 and 106 requirement.

Math course:

  • The BA in chemistry requires the MATH 125/126 sequence.
  • The BS requires the MATH 121/122/223/224 sequence.
  • Students who place in MATH 120 should take MATH 120 in the first semester and then proceed in either of the above two sequences.
  • Students who are uncertain whether they will pursue the BA or BS should follow the BS recommendations. 

Immerse yourself in Chinese language, literature and culture as you develop skills that can be applied to government, business and academic fields.


Major-specific course: Language courses are self-placement using the following guidelines:

  • Students with no prior language experience may begin at the 101-level.
  • For students with some exposure to the language in childhood (sometimes known as "heritage learners", plus formal high school study: one year of language study in high school equals one semester in college. Students with four years of high school study and/or with incoming AP/IB credit are eligible for CHIN 301 or 302.
  • For all other students with high school study only: three semesters of language in high school equal one semester in college. Students are encouraged to contact the faculty member teaching the course in which they want to enroll to discuss their background. Students should be aware that final placement will be determined by the instructor during the first two weeks of the semester, and be prepared for an oral and written test.

Program note: Students should feel comfortable studying more than one language at a time if interested.

Course highlight: Linguistics courses offered in cognitive science, in addition to the ones offered in modern languages and literatures (listed under LING), may be of interest to students majoring in a language.

Build your future through classes on the planning, design and construction of everything from transportation systems to land-reclamation projects.


Math course: Students should take a math course in their first semester based on math diagnostic score and incoming credit

  • Options include: MATH 120/121/122/223/224

Chemistry, Physics or Programming course: Courses are listed in order of importance.

  • CHEM 111 is recommended for the first semester
    • Students with incoming CHEM 111 credit may choose to take the next course in the sequence (ENGR 145) or a different course.
  • ENGR 130 is recommended for the first semester
    • Students with complementary interests in computer science should take CSDS 132 instead of ENGR 130.
  • Students will typically take PHYS 121 in their second semester unless they already have credit for a programming or chemistry course.
    • Students taking MATH 120 should take ENGR 130 in the first semester and defer PHYS 121 to the second semester.

Using a range of approaches, from anthropological to philosophical, you'll gain knowledge in the languages and literature of ancient Greece and Rome.


Major-specific course:

  • Prospective classics majors should take CLSC 231 and CLSC 232 as soon as possible. 
  • Students should start GREK and/or LATN as soon as possible.  
    • Students who have not had Greek or Latin must take GREK 101 or LATN 101 before being able to go further.
    • Students who have had two or more years of Latin (or Greek) in high school should proceed to LATN 201 or Greek 202.
    • Students who have credit for LATN 202 through AP Latin may enroll in LATN 309. Those with a similar demonstrable experience in Greek may enroll in GREK 307.

Program notes: CLSC 231, LATN 101 and GREK 102 are only taught in the fall, while GREK 101, LATN 102 and CLSC 232 are only taught in the spring. 

Course highlights: 

  • ANEE/HSTY 107 – History of the Ancient Near East & Egypt 
  • ANEE/CLSC/HSTY 194 – Catapults and Cavalry: Warfare in the Ancient Mediterranean
  • CLSC/THTR 319 – Greek Tragedy: Plays and Performance in Ancient Athens 

As you study the brain and mind, you'll not only learn the core disciplines of cognitive science, but also the impact of arts and humanities on them.


Major-specific course:

  • It is recommended that prospective cognitive science majors complete COGS 101 in their first semester. 
  • In addition to COGS 101, interested students may take COGS 201.

Discover how we are able to communicate and what happens when people have deficits with oral communication as you learn foundational knowledge about speech, language, and hearing science, anatomy and physiology of the speech, hearing and swallowing mechanisms, aspects of cognition and aging, and the fundamentals of audiology and speech-language pathology.


Major-specific course:

  • Students interested in the major should enroll in COSI 109 as soon as possible.
  • Students should also consider taking PSCL 101 in the first semester.
    • Students who have credit (AP, IB, or transfer) for PSCL 101 should enroll in PSCL 282 or STAT 201, or PSCL 230.

Course highlights:

  • Courses on global/cultural diversity (COSI 260 and 261) fulfill general breadth requirements for courses on Global and Cultural Diversity. 
  • Communication Sciences offers an integrated graduate program (IGS) in speech language pathology.
    • Interested students should immediately contact an academic advisor in Communication Sciences for further information. 
  • The Communication for Health Professionals minor which provides an opportunity for students with primary interests in health fields and careers associated with healthcare.

Program note: Students interested in careers in speech-language pathology and audiology and plan to go to graduate school for these professions should immediately contact an academic advisor in Communication Sciences to discuss additional requirements required by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association for admission into graduate school
 

You can create the next big thing in tech—with the right know-how and hands-on experience to analyze, evaluate, design and implement your idea.


Math course: Students should take a math course in their first semester based on math diagnostic score and incoming credit

  • Options include: MATH 120/121/122/223/224

Chemistry, Physics or Programming course: Courses are listed in order of importance.

  • Students should take ECSE 132 in the first semester. 
    • Students who have credit for ECSE 132 and strong coding experience may enroll in ECSE 233 or ECSE 281.
  • Chemistry options include CHEM 111 or ENGR 145.
  • Students will typically take PHYS 121 in their second semester unless they already have credit for a programming or chemistry course.

Develop new techniques and technologies that will change the world. Here, you can study anything from software engineering to artificial intelligence.


The computer science major is offered as part of the Bachelor of Arts (BA) in the College of Arts and Sciences, as well as a Bachelor of Science (BS) in the Case School of Engineering. Important distinctions are listed when necessary below.

Programming Course: one of the below:

  • CSDS 101: This introductory course is intended for potential computer science majors who have no prior coding or computer science experience. 
  • CSDS 132: For students with some coding or computer science background
  • CSDS 233 or 281: For students who have incoming CSDS 132 credit and strong coding experience

Math course:

  • Options for the BS include MATH 120, 121, 122, 223, and 224.
  • Options for the BA include MATH 120, 125, and 126.
  • Students who are uncertain whether they will pursue the BA or BS should follow the BS math recommendations.

Chemistry or Physics course: Courses are listed in order of importance.

  • CHEM 111 is required for the BS major, but not for the BA.
    • Students interested in the BA only can elect to take another course of interest.
  • Like chemistry, the physics course sequence is required for the BS but not for the BA.
    • Students will typically take PHYS 121 in their second semester unless they already have credit for a programming or chemistry course.
    • However, students with a strong interest in physics (PHYS 121 or 122, depending on incoming credit) may elect to take it in the first semester, with or in place of CHEM 111.

Whether dance is a hobby or your future career, we provide the highest caliber of education and training across styles from ballet to modern.


Program notes:

  • Students intending to major in dance should communicate with Professor Karen Potter, Chair, Department of Dance (karen.potter@case.edu) to determine the appropriate level of placement for DANC 103/104/203. Once determined, students should contact their navigator about obtaining permission to enroll in the course.
  • Students are encouraged to audition for Mather Dance Collective (MaDaCol). It is a fun, pressure-relieving, Sunday night activity that culminates in a performance at the end of the semester. Students must commit to the weekly rehearsals, and a week-long evening commitment during the MaDaCol performance week. Contact Professor Potter for more information.

Major-specific course:

  • Based on placement, students should register for:
    • DANC 103/104/203 and/or
    • DANC 121/122 in their first semester. DANC 121/122 can be taken in the second year depending on the demands of a second major of interest.
  • Students should also consider DANC 260/360 in their first semester; however, if a student is exploring other interests or has a second major, this can be taken in the second year.

Students pursuing a secondary major, double-major or dual-degree should use open course slots for other required courses.

Big data is the future; discover how you can analyze reams of information to make informed decisions that can change your field—and beyond.


Programming Course: one of the below:

  • CSDS 101: This introductory course is intended for potential computer science majors who have no prior coding or computer science experience. 
  • CSDS 132: For students with some coding or computer science background
  • CSDS 233 or 281: For students who have incoming CSDS 132 credit and strong coding experience

Math course: Students should take a math course in their first semester based on math diagnostic score and incoming credit

  • Options include: MATH 120/121/122/223/224

Chemistry or Physics course: Courses are listed in order of importance.

  • CHEM 111 is required for the Data Science and Analytics major, but no further chemistry coursework is required.
    • CHEM 111 is highly recommended for the first semester, but can be taken in the second semester if preferred.
    • If you already have credit for CHEM 111 you may choose to take PHYS 121 or another course of interest instead. 
  • Students will typically take PHYS 121 in their second semester unless they already have credit for a programming or chemistry course.

Through our personalized program, you'll learn how public policy and market forces interact to affect your future profession and the world.


Math course: 

  • Students interested in pursuing economics may enroll in MATH 120 (if applicable), MATH 121 or MATH 125 in the first semester. Students who have credit for any calculus courses may choose to register for the next course in the sequence in fall or spring.
    • MATH 120/121/122/223/224 are recommended for students who may be interested in studying economics in graduate school or have strong interests in math.
    • While it is recommended that students take two semesters of calculus for the general economics major, students who wish to take only one semester of calculus should take MATH 125. (Note, however, for the Quantitative Methods concentration, students are required to take two semesters of calculus).

Major-specific course:

  • Students planning to major in economics should ideally complete ECON 102 and ECON 103 in their first year.
    • If a student is interested in taking an economics elective course in their second semester, then ECON 102 is preferred, as most economics electives require ECON 102.
  • Students with credit for ECON 102 or ECON 103 should contact Professor Jonathan Ernest (jonathan.ernest@case.edu).

Study signal processing, computation and more in a curriculum that encourages you to combine your talent for design with your problem-solving ability.


Math course: Students should take a math course in their first semester based on math diagnostic score and incoming credit

  • Options include: MATH 120/121/122/223/224

Chemistry, Physics or Programming course: Courses are listed in order of importance.

  • Students should take ENGR 130 in the first semester. 
    • Students who have complementary interests in computer science should take CSDS 132.
    • Students who have credit for ENGR 130 or CSDS 132 can choose PHYS 121 or ECSE 281.
  • Chemistry options include CHEM 111 or ENGR 145
  • Students will typically take PHYS 121 in their second semester unless they already have credit for a programming or chemistry course.

Have a strong interest in physics and engineering?  Here, you can study both.  Our curriculum prepares you for a career in the industry of your choice.


Math course: Students should take a math course based on math diagnostic score and incoming credit

  • Options include: MATH 120/121/122/223/224

Chemistry, Physics or Programming course: Courses are listed in order of importance.

  • PHYS 121 (or higher based on incoming credit) is recommended for the first semester.
  • CHEM 111 is recommended for first semester
    • Students with incoming CHEM 111 credit may advance to ENGR 145 (the next course in the chemistry sequence).
  • ENGR 130 is recommended for students who:
    • Take MATH 120 in the first semester
    • Have PHYS 121 credit and defer PHYS 122 to the second semester
  • Students with complementary interests in computer science should take CSDS 132 instead of ENGR 130. 

Program note: Students interested in Engineering Physics are encouraged to declare in their first semester to allow for close advising/scheduling support.

From classic literature to graphic novels, specialize your studies to spur your intellectual curiosity, analytical dexterity and creative thinking.


Major-specific course:

  • Students interested in studying English can take any 200-level English course, and some 300-level courses if they meet the prerequisites.
  • Students placed into FSAE 100 – Academic English should defer a 200-level English course until the second semester.

Course highlights: for students with a specific interest, consider some of the following:

  • ENGL 200 – Literature in English
  • ENGL 203 – Introduction to Creative Writing
  • ENGL 204 – Introduction to Journalism
  • ENGL 213 – Introduction to Fiction Writing
  • ENGL 214 – Introduction to Poetry Writing
  • ENGL 257B – Introduction to Poetry
  • ENGL 285 – Special Topics Seminar: Protest Literature
  • ENGL 367 – Introduction to Film
  • ENGL 368 – Topics in Film: Classic American Fiction on Film

Program note: Students who are interested in qualifying for Honors in English might want to take a foreign language course (an intermediate foreign language course is one way of fulfilling the language studies requirement for the Honors track).

Our program combines geological, basic and applied sciences to provide you with a deep understanding of environmental problems and employable skills.


EEPS courses: As an introduction to the major, students should consider taking one of the following, although not required in their first semester if they are exploring multiple interests:

  • EEPS 110 with EEPS 119
  • EEPS 117
  • EEPS 101 

Chemistry sequence:

  • Options include CHEM 105 and 106 based on incoming credit.
  • CHEM 113 (lab component, if schedule allows) - students may choose another course of interest in place of CHEM 113 for the first semester if they are exploring other major options.
  • Students who are also considering an alternate major that requires the CHEM 111 and ENGR 145 sequence may substitute these courses for the CHEM 105 and 106 requirements

Math course:

  • Requires MATH 125/126 sequence
  • Students who are considering a major that requires the MATH 121/122 sequence should pursue those math recommendations.
  • Students who place in MATH 120 should take MATH 120 in the first semester and then proceed in either the MATH 125/126 or MATH 121/122 sequence.
  • Students who are uncertain about pursuing a STEM-based major such as Environmental Geology may replace their math course with another course as part of their major exploration process.

This multidisciplinary program rounds out your education and skills, diving into the moral, cultural and political dimensions of environmental issues.


Major-specific course: The entry course for this major, ESTD 101, is offered in the spring semester only. Students interested in the major can explore related courses in humanities, social sciences and science and engineering. Suggestions include: ANTH 102, EEPS 110, EEPS 117, EEPS 119, HSTY 240, RLGN 206.

Discover the history of life on Earth, understand evolutionary processes and prepare for a career in a range of fields, from agriculture to medicine.


EEPS 210: This introductory course covers the discovery and measurement of deep time, the origin of life, and earth systems history in the last 4.5 billion years.

OR

EEPS 225: This multidisciplinary study provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationships among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms.

Chemistry sequence:

  • Options include CHEM 105 and 106 based on incoming credit.
  • Students who are also considering an alternate major that requires the CHEM 111 and ENGR 145 sequence may substitute these courses for the CHEM 105 and 106 requirement.

Biology 214 and 214L (lab): 

  • This course is offered both fall and spring, so can be deferred if a student is exploring an additional major of interest.
  • Students with AP/IB biology credit are still required to take these courses.
  • Students should register for both the lecture (BIOL 214) and lab (BIOL 214L).

As a finance student, you'll not only learn key management principles but also financial markets, valuation, modeling and other quantitative skills.


MATH: Course based on diagnostic score and incoming credit

  • Sequence options include: MATH 120, MATH 121 or 125
    • MATH 125 is recommended for students placing into Calculus I
    • Students considering other majors that require MATH 121 should enroll in MATH 121 instead.
  • If you have credit for MATH 121/125, you may choose to:
    • Register for computer programming (DESN 210, ENGR 131, or CSDS 132), statistics (OPRE 207), or Calculus II (MATH 122/126) in the first semester.
    • Defer taking computer programming, statistics or Calculus II until a later semester and replace with a different course of interest in the first semester instead.

ACCT 100: This course introduces students to the basics of financial, managerial and tax accounting and is a gateway course for students considering any major in Weatherhead School of Management.

Other courses for consideration: If there is room in schedule, students may wish to take one of the following:

  • ECON: Students can take ECON 102 (Principles of Microeconomics) or ECON 103 (Principles of Macroeconomics) in their first semester
  • MGMT 201: This course is designed to survey business topics, issues and practice. Students will be introduced to each of the functional areas of business.

Master French language skills while studying literature, film and the arts, and grow your appreciation for the diversity of Francophone cultures.


Major-specific course: Language courses are self-placement using the following guidelines

  • Students with no prior language experience may begin at the 101-level.
  • For students with previous experience, one year of language in high school equals one semester in college.
  • Students with four years of high school language and/or AP/IB credit may take beginning 300-level courses (numbered under 320).  FRCH 310 is the recommended course for students who begin at the 300-level. 
  • Students uncertain of their placement may contact the faculty member teaching the course in which they want to enroll to discuss their background.

Program note: Students should feel comfortable studying more than one language at a time if interested.

Designed to develop cross-cultural awareness and understanding, this program gives you flexibility to study all aspects of French/Francophone culture.


Program note:  Each student prepares a program of study in close consultation with a faculty advisor drawn from the advisory committee.

Major-specific course: Language courses are self-placement using the following guidelines:

  • Students with no prior language experience may begin at the 101-level.
  • For students with previous experience, one year of language in high school equals one semester in college. Students with four years of high school language and/or AP/IB credit may take beginning 300-level courses (less than 320). 
  • Students uncertain of their placement may contact the faculty member teaching the course in which they want to enroll to discuss their background.

Course highlight: Linguistics courses offered in cognitive science, in addition to the ones offered in modern languages and literatures (listed under LING), may be of interest to students majoring in a language.

Obtain a solid background in earth sciences and hone the research and critical-thinking skills you need to ask—and answer—questions about the world.


EEPS courses: As an introduction to the major, students should consider taking one of the following, although not required in their first semester if they are exploring multiple interests:

  • EEPS 110 with EEPS 119
  • EEPS 117
  • EEPS 101 

Chemistry sequence:

  • Options include CHEM 105 and 106 based on incoming credit.
  • CHEM 113 (lab component, if schedule allows) - students may choose another course of interest in place of CHEM 113 for the first semester if they are exploring other major options.
  • Students who are also considering an alternate major that requires the CHEM 111 and ENGR 145 sequence may substitute these courses for the CHEM 105 and 106 requirements.

Math course:

  • The BA requires the MATH 125/126 sequence.
  • The BS requires the MATH 121/122 sequence, plus two additional semesters of MATH and/or STAT.
  • Students who place in MATH 120 should take MATH 120 in the first semester and then proceed in either of the above two sequences.
  • Students who are uncertain whether they will pursue the BA or BS should follow the BS recommendations.
  • Students who are uncertain about pursuing a STEM-based major such as Geological Sciences may replace their math course with another course as part of their major exploration process.

Become a master of German language, literature and culture as you develop skills that can be applied to a variety of fields in today's global economy.


Major-specific course: Language courses are self-placement using the following guidelines:

  • Students with no prior language experience may begin at the 101-level.
  • For students with previous experience, one year of language in high school equals one semester in college.
  • Students with four years of high school language and/or AP/IB credit in language or literature may take beginning 300-level courses (less than 320). 
  • Students uncertain of their placement may contact the faculty member teaching the course in which they want to enroll to discuss optimal placement.

Course highlight: Students majoring in a language/literature may also enroll in world literature (such as WLIT 212) or linguistics courses (LING). 

Integrating research and theory, this multidisciplinary program allows you to study the social and professional effects of our aging population.


Major-specific course: Courses for the major are drawn from three departments: Anthropology, Psychological Sciences and Sociology.  Students interested in the major can explore related courses in these departments.

Learn to grapple with today's issues by developing a deeper understanding of the past. A degree in history can prepare you for a multitude of careers.


Program note: Students who have earned a 5 on at least one AP History exam or a 6 or 7 on an IB Higher Level History exam, and who wish to receive CWRU credit, are invited via email over the summer to enroll in HSTY 100 (1 credit). Successful completion of this course will earn students an additional three elective credits in history (HSTY 100-TR).

Major-specific course: Students interested in history should feel comfortable taking any HSTY course, with the exception of HSTY 398 - Senior Research Seminar. Introductory courses are a great place to start, such as:

  • HSTY 103: Introduction to Medieval History, 500-1500
  • HSTY 107: Introduction to the Ancient Near East and Egypt
  • HSTY 108: Introduction to Early American History
  • HSTY 111: What is Science? Introduction to the History and Philosophy of Science
  • HSTY 113: Introduction to Modern World History
  • HSTY 136: Introduction to Latin American History
  • HSTY 137: Introduction to Modern South Asia

Explore the nature and historical development of science and related disciplines (technology, medicine and mathematics) through a humanistic lens.


Major-specific course:

  • Students interested in the history and philosophy of science may wish to take HPSC 111 during their first semester.
  • Students may choose any HSTY course of interest in the first semester, though a HSTY course with substantive science content is preferred. 
  • Students may also elect to take an additional PHIL course instead, if preferred.

Program note: Though not required for the major, students may wish to take courses to strengthen their background in the sciences.

Develop expertise in a region of the world, including its languages and issues, and gain a better understanding of global dynamics and complexities.


Major-specific course:

  • The international studies major contains four foundational courses that can be taken at any time during the first year: ANTH 102, ECON 103, HSTY 113 and POSC 172.
    • It is helpful to complete these courses before beginning coursework for the area and topical foci of the major.
  • International studies requires "competency in a non-native language."  Students can begin taking courses in a language from a region of the world that is of greatest interest to them during their first semester, but it is not required. 
    • Students beginning a new language should keep in mind that the first course in some languages is offered only in the fall.

Grow your understanding of Japanese language and culture as you study everything from literature to religion, history to art.


Program note: Students considering the Japanese studies major may begin taking Japanese language courses during their first semester, but it is not required.

Major-specific course: Language courses are self-placement using the following guidelines:

  • Students with no prior language experience may begin at the 101-level.
  • For students with previous experience, one year of language in high school equals one semester in college. Students with four years of high school language and/or AP/IB credit may take beginning 300-level courses (less than 350). 
  • Students uncertain of their placement may contact the faculty member teaching the course in which they want to enroll to discuss their background.

Build a solid business background and develop skills in marketing strategy, brand management and more to prepare for a career in marketing and sales.


MATH: Course based on diagnostic score and incoming credit

  • Sequence options include: MATH 120, MATH 121 or 125
    • MATH 125 is recommended for students placing into Calculus I
    • Students considering other majors that require MATH 121 should enroll in MATH 121 instead.
  • If you have credit for MATH 121/125, you may choose to:
    • Register for computer programming (DESN 210, ENGR 131, or CSDS 132), statistics (OPRE 207), or Calculus II (MATH 122/126) in the first semester.
    • Defer taking computer programming, statistics or Calculus II until a later semester and replace with a different course of interest in the first semester instead.

ACCT 100: This course introduces students to the basics of financial, managerial and tax accounting and is a gateway course for students considering any major in Weatherhead School of Management.

Other courses for consideration: If there is room in schedule, students may wish to take one of the following:

  • ECON: Students can take ECON 102 (Principles of Microeconomics) or ECON 103 (Principles of Macroeconomics) in their first semester
  • MGMT 201: This course is designed to survey business topics, issues and practice. Students will be introduced to each of the functional areas of business.

Study how the physics and chemistry of matter play into industrial and engineering processes; plus gain hands-on experience in state-of-the-art facilities. 


EMSE 110: This is the first of two introductory courses that provides students with exposure to real-word design, manufacturing, and industrial applications. While this is a required course for the major in Materials Science and Engineering, it can be taken in the fall of any year, and is not required in the first year.

Math course: Students should take a math course in their first semester based on math diagnostic score and incoming credit

  • Options include: MATH 120/121/122/223/224

Chemistry, Physics or Programming course: Courses are listed in order of importance.

  • Options include: CHEM 111 or ENGR 145
  • Students should take ENGR 130 or CSDS 132 in the first semester.
  • If schedule allows, students may take PHYS 121 in the first semester.

Math plays a key role in the physical, biological, economic and social sciences. Prepare for a career across fields by honing math/statistical skills.


Math course: Students should take a math course in their first semester based on math diagnostic score and incoming credit. Options include:

  • MATH 120/121/122/223/224
  • By invitation only: MATH 124/227
    • Please note: these courses require an email invitation from the department and associated prerequisites (e.g. AP/IB credit); if eligible, more information will be emailed to you. These courses can substitute for same-level math courses in the other sequences.

Programming course:

  • Students interested in completing the BA may take ENGR 131, CSDS 132, or ECSE 132.
  • Students interested in completing the BS should not take ENGR 131, as they will complete a different programming course (MATH 330) in a later semester.

Science sequence:

  • The BS requires a science core sequence. 
  • Options for the first course in the sequence include:
    • ASTR 101
    • CHEM 105
    • CHEM 111
    • EEPS 110
  • Students with AP credit for the first course in the sequence may continue to the second course in their science sequence, or defer their science course to a later semester.
  • The BA does not require a science core sequence and students may choose a general education course or other course of interest.

Experience a synergistic, coherent and parallel education in mathematics and physics in a program that combines the cores of both disciplines.


Math course: Students should take a math course in their first semester based on math diagnostic score and incoming credit

  • Options include: MATH 120/121/122/223/224

Physics course:

  • Students interested in the Mathematics and Physics major should begin taking physics as soon as possible.  However, students who would benefit from improving their understanding of integral and differential calculus can delay taking physics with no adverse consequence.
  • Students should not advance to PHYS 122 unless they are also at the MATH 122 level or higher.
  • Students who place into MATH 120 via the math diagnostic should take ENGR 131 or CSDS 132 in the first semester, and PHYS 121 in the second semester.
  • Students who are invited to take PHYS 123 are encouraged to consider this option in place of PHYS 121.

Chemistry sequence:

  • Options include CHEM 105 and 106 based on incoming credit.
  • Students who are also considering an alternate major that requires the CHEM 111 and ENGR 145 sequence may substitute these courses for the CHEM 105 and 106 requirement.

PHYS 166 - Physics Today and Tomorrow: this optional, one-credit pass/no pass course designed to give first-year students a sense of what physicists actually do in their careers, with introductions to a variety of topics at the frontiers of science. It is not required, but is strongly recommended for students thinking of majoring in physics.

Master the fundamentals of chemistry, physics and mathematics while learning methods of modern experimental engineering analysis and data acquisition.


Math course: Students should take a math course in their first semester based on math diagnostic score and incoming credit

  • Options include: MATH 120/121/122/223/224

Chemistry, Physics or Programming course: Courses are listed in order of importance.

  • CHEM 111 is recommended for the first semester
    • Students with incoming CHEM 111 credit may choose to take the next course in the sequence (ENGR 145) or a different course.
  • PHYS 121 (or higher based on incoming credit) is recommended for the first semester.
  • ENGR 130 is recommended for students who:
    • Take MATH 120 in the first semester
    • Have PHYS 121 credit and defer PHYS 122 to the second semester
  • Students with complementary interests in computer science should take CSDS 132 instead of ENGR 130. 

Hone your musical skills and knowledge through an experience that gives you a wide range of opportunities for musical study and participation. Requires audition.


Program notes:

  • Most incoming music majors are directly admitted to the major based upon audition materials submitted during the application process.
  • Students interested in the music major who have not yet been accepted to the major should schedule an audition by contacting: Eric Charnofsky, Coordinator of Undergraduate Enrollment in Music, eric.charnofsky@case.edu 
  • Pre-assessments:
    • Professor Charnofsky will contact students over the summer with information about the music theory/ear training placement and sight-singing examinations. The first music theory course assignment will be determined from the scores on these tests.
    • Students are encouraged to prepare for these tests using the resources listed at music.case.edu/incoming-students/music-theory-placement-exam.

Major-specific course: 7 credits

After pre-assessments have been completed, students will be contacted about how to proceed with enrollment. The following courses are required for first-year music majors:

  • Music Theory (MUTH, entry level based on placement exams): Once the student is notified of placement level, they will need to submit a permission request via SIS for their preferred section of this course. Once the permission has been granted, they will need to enroll in the course.  This class is five days per week (M-F), usually in the morning.
  • Applied lessons (MUAP 121): Students will be enrolled automatically by the Music Department.
  • Primary ensembles (MUEN): Auditions for most ensembles will take place during the first week of classes. Following the audition, students will need to submit a permission request via SIS. Once the permission has been granted, they will need to enroll in the course.
  • Eurythmics (MUDE 101): Recommended for first year music majors, but may be delayed until the second year. Students will be notified when they may submit a permission request via SIS. Once the permission has been granted, they need to enroll in the course.

Students pursuing a secondary major, double-major or dual-degree should use open course slots for other required courses.  As a reminder, the Music Theory (MUTH) course is five days per week (M-F), usually in the morning, so students should leave a block of time open for this placement.

Want to use your musical skills to teach others? Pursue a fully accredited curriculum that develops your abilities for musical instruction.


Program notes:

  • Incoming music education majors are directly admitted to the major based upon audition and interview materials during the application process.
  • Music education students will receive an email to their CWRU email account from Dr. Matthew Garrett, Coordinator of Undergraduate Studies in Music Education (mgarrett@case.edu) in May to review preliminary information for their first semester.
    • Students interested in the music education major who have not yet been accepted to the major should schedule an audition and interview by contacting Dr. Matthew Garrett.
    • Students with questions about the Bachelor of Science in music education should contact Dr. Garrett directly.

Pre-assessments:

  • Professor Charnofsky will contact students over the summer with information about piano proficiency, music theory/ear training placement and sight-singing examinations. The first music theory course assignment will be determined from the scores on these tests.
  • Students are encouraged to prepare for these tests using the resources listed at music.case.edu/incoming-students/music-theory-placement-exam.

Major-specific course: 7-10 credits

After pre-assessments have been completed, students will be contacted about how to proceed with enrollment. The following courses are required for first-year music education majors:

  • Basic Skills & Pedagogy (MUED 200): options are specific to a student's primary instrument, so they should contact Dr. Garrett directly to discuss placement.
  • Music Theory (MUTH, entry level based on placement exams): Once the student is notified of placement level, they will need to submit a permission request via SIS for their preferred section of this course. Once the permission has been granted, they will need to enroll in the course.  This class is five days per week (M-F), usually in the morning.
  • Applied lessons (MUAP 121): Students will be enrolled automatically by the Music Department.
  • Primary ensembles (MUEN): Auditions for most ensembles will take place during the first week of classes. Following the audition, students will need to submit a permission request via SIS. Once the permission has been granted, they will need to enroll in the course.
  • Eurythmics (MUDE 101): Recommended for first year music majors, but may be delayed until the second year. Students will be notified when they may submit a permission request via SIS. Once the permission has been granted, they need to enroll in the course.

Build your understanding of the natural world through an interdisciplinary education that develops a broad background in the sciences.


Math course:

  • Requires one of the following two-semester math sequences:
    • MATH 125/126, or
    • MATH 121/122
  • Students who are considering a major that requires the MATH 121/122 sequence should pursue those math recommendations.
  • Students who place in MATH 120 should take MATH 120 in the first semester, and then proceed in either MATH 125/126 or MATH 121/122 sequence.

Science sequence: Students should choose an introductory science course from this list (followed by the second in the sequence in the second semester).

  • ASTR 101 
  • ASTR 221
  • BIOL 214 + BIOL 214L
  • CHEM 105
  • CHEM 111
  • EEPS 101
  • EEPS 110
  • PHYS 115
  • PHYS 121

Understanding how the nervous system develops and functions and how it is altered by disease, injury, or environmental factors is one of the most exciting frontiers remaining in biomedical research today. 


NEUR 166 - Explorations in Neuroscience (1 credit):  Offered in the fall only, this required course introduces students to the major, including topics in basic and translational research, as well as perspectives on neuroscience as a profession. 

Biology 214 and 214L (lab): 

  • It is best to take BIOL 214 and 214L in the first semester due to later course sequencing and prerequisites.
  • If needed, this course is offered both fall and spring, so can be deferred if a student is exploring an additional major of interest.
  • Students with AP/IB biology credit are still required to take these courses.
  • Students should register for both the lecture (BIOL 214) and lab (BIOL 214L).

Chemistry sequence:

  • Options include CHEM 105 and 106 based on incoming credit.
  • CHEM 113 (lab component, if schedule allows)
  • Students who are also considering an alternate major that requires the CHEM 111 and ENGR 145 sequence may substitute these courses for the CHEM 105 and 106 requirement.

Math course:

  • The major requires the MATH 125/126 sequence.
  • Students considering an alternate major that require the MATH 121/122 sequence can substitute these courses for the 125/126 sequence.
  • Students who place in MATH 120 should take MATH 120 in the first semester and then proceed in either of the above two sequences.

Looking for a nursing program that gives you a strong education in the classroom while also allowing you to conduct clinical work in your first semester? Look no further.


Please read the following instructions carefully, as the nursing course registration process differs from other majors.

Note that Nursing students are admitted directly to the Nursing program, as it has required coursework that is essential to progress in the major. The curriculum can only be started in the fall semester, and students will be assigned a Nursing advisor to assist with planning in addition to their Navigator and SAGES academic advisor.

Major-specific course: Staff in the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing will pre-enroll students for the following courses in mid-July:

  • NURS 115 
    • This course includes lecture, lab, and clinical components
    • There are multiple day/time offerings, and your enrollment will be determined by the Nursing School staff
  • NURS 277
  • BIOL 114
  • BIOL 116

Breadth course: In addition to the above pre-enrolled courses, students will choose ONE additional course to count toward a general education breadth requirement. Please note:

  • Breadth courses can include any 3- or 4-credit course outside of the areas of nursing, natural science, and mathematics. These can be offered by the College of Arts and Sciences, the Case School of Engineering, the Weatherhead School of Management, the Jack, Joseph, and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences, the School of Medicine Department of Bioethics, the Cleveland Institute of Music, or the Cleveland Institute of Art.
    • Courses from the School of Medicine Department of Public Health (MPHP) are NOT accepted for breadth requirements.
  • Students with incoming AP/IB/transfer credit that fulfills a breadth requirement can still take another course toward the breadth requirement; they can also select an elective course of interest, or take no course.
  • Students who choose to not take a general education course in the fall and do not have incoming credit toward this requirement will need to work with their Nursing academic advisor to plan a course in a subsequent term (e.g. summer).

How to build and update your shopping cart:

  • Based on the other subject areas listed in this resource, explore courses in subjects that interest you and meet the Nursing breadth requirements.
  • Add 4 or more breadth courses options to your shopping cart. We recommend you choose courses at various day and time periods to ensure you will have one course that fits your schedule after your final NURS and BIOL course pre-enrollments.
  • Complete Step 4 in this resource to notify your navigator that your breadth course options in your shopping cart are ready for review. Your navigator will provide guidance on the breadth options you chose as an “appointment note” in My Journey.
  • In mid-July, check your schedule in SIS to see the days/times of your NURS and BIOL course enrollments. Update your breadth course options so that you have a few options with days/times that work with your schedule. 

Remember, during registration, you will ONLY need to register for your breadth course and select your top four SAGES preferences (if applicable).
 

From dietetics to public health, nutrition encompasses a variety of topics, including metabolism and metabolomics, to ready you for a number of jobs.


NTRN 201: This course introduces students to nutrients, their functions, food sources, and factors affecting human needs throughout life. Encouraged for the first semester for students considering the nutrition major.

Chemistry sequence:

  • Options include CHEM 105 and 106 based on incoming credit.
  • Students who are also considering an alternate major that requires the CHEM 111 and ENGR 145 sequence may substitute these courses for the CHEM 105 and 106 requirement.
  • CHEM 113: Only required for students pursuing the Nutrition BS, and can be deferred to spring if a student wishes to pursue another course/major of interest.

Biology 214 and 214L (lab): 

  • This course is offered both fall and spring, so can be deferred if a student is exploring an additional major of interest.
  • Students with AP/IB biology credit are still required to take these courses.
  • Students should register for both the lecture (BIOL 214) and lab (BIOL 214L).

Additional course highlights: The following courses may also be of interest to students interested in exploring nutrition, including students who do not intend to major in nutrition:

  • NTRN 300: Healthy Lifestyles as Preventive Medicine 
  • NTRN 320: Women’s Wellness - From Food and Nutrition to Reproductive Health & Aging
  • NTRN 200E: Case Cooks - Ethnic Eats
  • NTRN 200H: Case Cooks - Healthy Lifestyles
  • NTRN 200S: Case Cooks - Sports & Performance
     

Our program allows you to study nutrients and metabolic functions to prepare you for a future in nutrition, metabolic research or other health field.


Math course:

  • The BA requires the MATH 125/126 sequence.
  • The BS requires the MATH 121/122 sequence.
  • Students who place in MATH 120 should take MATH 120 in the first semester and then proceed in either of the above two sequences.
  • Students who are uncertain whether they will pursue the BA or BS should follow the BS recommendations. 

NTRN 201: This course introduces students to nutrients, their functions, food sources, and factors affecting human needs throughout life. Encouraged for the first semester for students considering the nutrition major.

Chemistry sequence:

  • Options include CHEM 105 and 106 based on incoming credit.
  • Students who are also considering an alternate major that requires the CHEM 111 and ENGR 145 sequence may substitute these courses for the CHEM 105 and 106 requirement.
  • CHEM 113: Can be taken in either fall or spring semester of first year, as schedule allows.

Biology 214 and 214L (lab): 

  • Students with AP/IB biology credit are still required to take these courses.
  • Students should register for the lecture (BIOL 214). The lab (BIOL 214L) is recommended for pre-med students, but not required for the major.

Work across disciplines to question and discover the origin and evolution of simple and complex systems—from the big bang to the human mind.


Program note:  Origins Sciences majors create their own diverse plans of study in consultation with the departmental advisors, faculty, and researchers. For more information contact Patricia Princehouse at pmp7@case.edu.

Math course:

  • Requires MATH 125/126 sequence
  • Students who are considering a major that requires the MATH 121/122 sequence should pursue those math recommendations.
  • Students who place in MATH 120 should take MATH 120 in the first semester and then proceed in either MATH 125/126 or MATH 121/122 sequence.
  • Students who have credit for MATH 121 and 122 may add PHYS 121/122 or PHYS 123/124 to their schedules or a general education elective of their choice instead.

Chemistry sequence:

  • Options include CHEM 105 and 106 based on incoming credit.
  • Students who are also considering an alternate major that requires the CHEM 111 and ENGR 145 sequence may substitute these courses for the CHEM 105 and 106 requirement.
  • CHEM 113: Can be taken in either fall or spring semester of first year, as schedule allows.

Biology 214 and 214L (lab): 

  • This course is offered both fall and spring, so can be deferred if a student is exploring an additional major of interest.
  • Students with AP/IB biology credit are still required to take these courses.
  • Students should register for both the lecture (BIOL 214) and lab (BIOL 214L).

ORIG 101: This 1-cr course introduces students to the research interests of Origins faculty, and thereby to some of the possibilities for student research or focused study. 

Build your analytical, critical thinking and communication skills in a program that shows how philosophy relates to math, science, the arts and more.


Major-specific course: PHIL 101 is a prerequisite for most upper-level PHIL courses and provides an introduction to basic themes and some important figures in the history of philosophy (primarily Western).   Students interested in the Philosophy major may consider taking this course during their first semester.

Program note: Students planning to pursue a philosophy major are advised to leave sufficient time in their schedule for reading and taking notes on difficult texts in their major classes and to take courses that will develop their reading and writing skills, as well as general knowledge of the world and its cultures.

Through theoretical and experimental work, you’ll study areas spanning the design and development of new materials to the workings of the universe.


Math course: Students should take a math course in their first semester based on math diagnostic score and incoming credit

  • Options include: MATH 120/121/122/223/224

Physics course:

  • Students interested in the Physics major should begin taking physics as soon as possible.  However, students who would benefit from improving their understanding of integral and differential calculus should delay taking physics until they complete MATH 121.
  • Students should not advance to PHYS 122 unless they are also at the MATH 122 level or higher.
  • Students who place into MATH 120 via the math diagnostic should take ENGR 131 or CSDS 132 in the first semester, and delay taking PHYS 121 until they have credit for MATH 121.
  • Students who are invited to take PHYS 123 are encouraged to consider this option in place of PHYS 121 or PHYS 122.

Chemistry/science sequence:

  • BS Physics students should take a chemistry course. Chemistry options include CHEM 105 and 106 based on incoming credit.
    • Students who are considering an engineering physics or other Engineering major that requires the CHEM 111 and ENGR 145 sequence, should substitute these courses for the CHEM 105 and 106 requirement.
  • The BA provides more flexibility; any two-course science sequence outside of physics can meet this requirement; a list of accepted courses for this requirement can be found here.

PHYS 166 - Physics Today and Tomorrow: this optional, one-credit pass/no pass course designed to give first-year students a sense of what physicists actually do in their careers, with introductions to a variety of topics at the frontiers of science. It is not required, but is strongly recommended for students thinking of majoring in physics.

Explore political behavior, government institutions, international relations, finance, policy-making, protest and revolution and more in our programs.


Major-specific course:

  • The political science major has three foundational major required courses: POSC 109, POSC 160 and POSC 172. 
    • Students interested in the major are encouraged (but not required) to take one of these courses during their first semester.
    • These introductory courses are generally advised to be taken prior to any 300-level POSC courses.
  • Students with a strong interest in a 300-level POSC course and no experience with political science are encouraged to contact the course instructor listed in SIS, or the undergraduate studies coordinator Professor Joseph White (jxw87@case.edu) to discuss their background knowledge for the specific course content.

Study the development of polymeric materials and the application of structure-property relationships as you prepare for a career or further education.


Math course: Students should take a math course in their first semester based on math diagnostic score and incoming credit

  • Options include: MATH 120/121/122/223/224

Chemistry, Physics or Programming course: Courses are listed in order of importance.

  • Options include: CHEM 111 or ENGR 145
    • Students should complete ENGR 145 before the beginning of their second year.
  • ENGR 130 is the preferred option but students with complementary interests in computer science should take CSDS 132.
  • If schedule allows, students may take PHYS 121 in the first semester.
  • Students taking MATH 120 should take ENGR 130 in the first semester and defer PHYS 121 to the second semester.

EMAC 125:  Students interested in learning about the field of polymer science might consider enrolling in this Freshmen Research on Polymers in their fall semester schedule. Interested students should contact Professor Gary Wnek (gew5@case.edu) for information on enrolling.

Explore the forms, history and functions of architecture while gaining studio skills and practical knowledge from learning outside of the classroom.


Major-specific course: Students can begin exploring the major by taking any of the following courses:

  • ARTH 101 - Art History I: Pyramids to Pagodas
  • ARTH 102 - Art History II: Michelangelo to Maya Lin
  • ARTS 106 - Creative Drawing I

Psychology embraces all aspects of the human experience—from brain functions to neuron actions, from child development to care for the aged.


Major-specific course:

  • Students interested in the psychology major should take PSCL 101 during their first semester.
    • Students with credit for PSCL 101 may want to consider taking PSCL 282 (or STAT 201), PSCL 230, PSCL 315, PSCL 321, PSCL 352 or PSCL 357.

Explore and interpret beliefs, ideas, texts, practices and institutions from a range of scholarly perspectives to understand religion’s role in life.


Major-specific course: Students considering the religious studies major may consider enrolling in RLGN 101 or any 200-level elective, however taking major-specific courses during the first semester is not required. 

Study human interaction, the variation in human social organizations and the impact of both on the existence of the individual.


Major-specific course:

  • Interested students should take SOCI 101 in the first or second semester.
    • Students may take a 200-level SOCI course before taking SOCI 101.
    • 300-level SOCI courses should not be taken until the second year, and require SOCI 101 as a prerequisite.

Program notes: 

  • Sociology majors have the option of pursuing one of four concentrations: Health, Medicine and Aging; Crime, Law and Justice; Social Inequality; Gender, Work and Family. 
  • The Health, Medicine and Aging concentration and Social Inequality concentration are both well-suited for pre-health students.
  • The Crime, Law and Justice concentration is well-suited for pre-law students.

Immerse yourself in Spanish language, literature and culture as you develop skills that can be applied to all government, business and academic fields.


Major-specific course: Language courses are self-placement using the following guidelines:

  • Students with no prior language experience may begin at the 101-level.
  • For students with previous experience, one year of language in high school equals one semester in college. Students with four years of high school language and/or AP/IB credit may take beginning 300-level courses (less than 320). 
  • Students uncertain of their placement may contact the faculty member teaching the course in which they want to enroll to discuss their background.

Program note: Students should feel comfortable studying more than one language at a time if interested.

Course highlight: Linguistics courses offered in cognitive science, in addition to the ones offered in modern languages and literatures (listed under LING), may be of interest to students majoring in a language.

This rapidly changing field is invaluable as technology provides us with opportunities to understand uncertainty and probability.


Math course: Students should take a math course in their first semester based on math diagnostic score and incoming credit

  • Options include: MATH 120/121/122/223/224

Programming course:

  • ENGR 131 is the preferred programming course for statistics majors.
  • Students who are considering a major or minor that requires CSDS 132 may substitute it for the ENGR 131 requirement.

Science sequence:

  • The BS requires a science core sequence. 
  • Options for the first course in the sequence include:
    • BIOL 214
    • CHEM 105
    • CHEM 111
    • PHYS 121
  • Students with AP credit for the first course in the sequence may continue to the second course in their science sequence, or defer their science course to a later semester.
  • The BA does not require a science core sequence and students may choose a general education course or other course of interest.

Examine the basic concepts, cross-disciplinary techniques, analytical tools and engineering methods needed to analyze and design complex systems.


Math course: Students should take a math course in their first semester based on math diagnostic score and incoming credit

  • Options include: MATH 120/121/122/223/224

Chemistry, Physics or Programming course: Courses are listed in order of importance.

  • ENGR 130 is the preferred option but students with complementary interests in computer science should take CSDS 132.
    • Students who have credit for ENGR 130 or CSDS 132 can choose PHYS 121 or ECSE 281.
  • Chemistry options include CHEM 111 or ENGR 145
  • Students will typically take PHYS 121 in their second semester unless they already have credit for a programming or chemistry course.

Master advanced quantitative and computational skills in a fast-emerging area of research that combines math, computer science and biological science.


Math course: Students should take a math course in their first semester based on math diagnostic score and incoming credit

  • Options include: MATH 120/121/122/223/224

Chemistry sequence:

  • Options include CHEM 105 and 106 based on incoming credit.
  • Students who are also considering an alternate major that requires the CHEM 111 and ENGR 145 sequence may substitute these courses for the CHEM 105 and 106 requirement.

Biology 214:

  • This course is offered both fall and spring, so can be deferred if a student is exploring an additional major of interest.
  • Students with AP/IB biology credit are still required to take this course.

We train students who are experts in their fields to become accomplished teachers dedicated to instilling this knowledge in the next generation. This program is available as second major for a BA or as a companion to a BS.


Major-specific course: Students interested in pursuing teacher education as a second major should enroll in EDUC 301 in the fall.

Program notes: 

  • Students interested in a teaching career will pursue a primary major in the field of licensure (for which CWRU has received approval from the Ohio Department of Education and the Ohio Department of Higher Education) and choose teacher education as a second major.  
  • The teacher licensure areas are:
    • Adolescent to Young Adult (grades 7-12) in:
      • Integrated Language Arts (English major)
      • Integrated Social Studies (history major)
      • Integrated Mathematics (mathematics major)
      • Life Science (biology major)
      • Physical Science (chemistry or physics major)
    • Multi-Age (grades preK-12) in French, Spanish or Latin.
  • Teacher licensure programs are also available in Music Education.

A low student-to-faculty ratio allows you to work closely with highly trained professionals in the theater arts on anything from acting to directing.


Program notes: Theater majors can choose one of the following concentrations: acting, design/technical theater, directing, dramatic writing, general theater or theater and society.

Major-specific course:

  • Performance students:
    • Prioritize taking THTR 100 - Introduction to Acting in the first semester.
    • If possible, students should consider taking THTR 1110 - Introduction to Theater in the Fall as well.
  • Design and technical students should prioritize taking THTR 110 - Introduction to Theater in the fall semester.
  • Students register for THTR 185 with department approval upon being cast in a show.
    • Auditions usually occur during the first or second week of classes (two days of open calls) with callbacks on another day. Please contact the department during the first week of classes for further details or visit theater.case.edu for further details.
    • Students will enroll in THTR 185 each semester unless instructed to do otherwise by the Director of Undergraduate Theater Studies. 

Examine major issues of today in an interdisciplinary program that prepares you to think critically and creatively by using gender in your analysis.


WGST courses are cross-listed with a number of disciplines such as anthropology, art history, English, ethnic studies, French, history, Spanish and sociology. Students interested in women’s and gender studies may enroll in any course of interest in the above departments for which they meet the necessary prerequisites.

Study the literature of a wide variety of countries and regions in a multidisciplinary program that emphasizes contributions of past and present.


Major-specific courses:  Students interested in pursuing World Literature should consider taking WLIT 212 in the fall, or another WLIT course for which they meet the requisites, such as WLIT 202, 241, and 255 to begin their exploration of global literatures and cultures. 

More to Explore:

Minors are a great way to extend your study into another discipline outside of your major, but are not required.  Many (but not all) of the above-listed majors are also offered as minors. 

In most cases, students do not take a course toward a possible minor in their first semester; however if you are interested and your schedule allows, you can discuss first-semester course options with your navigator.

Additional minors are offered in:

  • African and African American Studies
  • Applied Data Science
  • Art Studio
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Banking and Finance
  • Bioethics and Medical Humanities
  • Childhood Studies
  • Communication for Health Professionals
  • Computer Gaming
  • Creative Writing
  • Electronics
  • Entrepreneurial Studies
  • Environmental Nutrition, Food Systems Sustainability, and Health
  • Ethics
  • Ethnic Studies
  • Film
  • Italian
  • Japanese
  • Judaic Studies
  • Leadership
  • Mechanical Design and Manufacturing
  • Public Health
  • Public Policy
  • Russian
  • Social Justice
  • Social Work
  • Sports Medicine
  • Sports Nutrition

We can prepare you with the right mix of undergraduate coursework to make you a highly desired candidate in your field of choice.  Rigorous classes, intensive mentoring and unsurpassed research opportunities. 


Learn about pre-health requirements.

Undergraduate students often take law school courses as electives, giving you a taste of a top-ranked law school before your undergrad years are over.


Learn about pre-law requirements.