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University Technology, [U]Tech

Training Structure + Details

Training Structure + Details


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RCCI is excited to introduce a new structure and design for our workshop and training offerings. With this new design, we try to satisfy the needs of the research computing users who are new to our services, as well as our current users. Since not all users have the same experiential background, we have categorized our seminars by levels: from the "I want to know about..." to more specialized seminars for our most advanced users. Our workshop design also includes Bootcamps, in which new users can be trained and become familiar with our campus cyberinfrastructure.

Organization of the workshops

We proceed to describe the newly designed categories (or training levels) for [U]Tech’s training workshops. These categories are organized from level zero to four. Each training level description is accompanied with a description of the intended audience, prerequisites and the learning outcomes.

These set of workshops are given by guest speakers that will provide insight and examples of a topic (for instance, exploring alternative uses of the HPC). 

  • Intended audience: anyone.
  • Basic prerequisites: just having an interest in the topic.
  • Learning Outcomes: Have a broader understanding of a topic and being able to find resources (local and web-wide) if the attendee wants to continue learning it.

A pre-introductory type of course that could be more basic than an introduction to a topic. Since we are not experts on all topics, this course would be a hands-on, lab-like set of sessions where [U]Tech and attendees work together to learn a topic. 

  • Intended audience: anyone.
  • Basic prerequisites: a laptop with the corresponding software/tools installed.
  • Learning outcomes: to be more comfortable working with the set of tools that were just explored and to understand both next steps and available resources.

These workshops should serve as an introduction to a topic. These introductions could be as simple as a four minute YouTube video, to a one hour workshop introducing a topic. 

  • Intended audience: anyone with a basic (or no) knowledge of a topic and wants to have a deeper understanding of a certain topic.  
  • Basic prerequisites: a laptop with the corresponding software/tools installed and, if needed, a general understanding of a topic. (For more advanced introductions, for example, basics would be covered only briefly before moving on)
  • Learning outcomes: have a deeper understanding of some process, tool, platform, or programming language, that will allow the attendee to develop a working knowledge of that topic.

Technical workshops: local experts (either [U]Tech instructors or guests) will teach a more advanced use of a tool, or some specific aspects of a topic. These workshops could complement Level 2 workshops as well. 

These topics could go from level one to three, where one could be an introduction to a topic, two would correspond to a tutorial, and three a one hour workshop with an introduction to a topic (for a more advanced audience). 

  • Intended audience: students, faculty and anyone who wants to have a better (and deeper) understanding of a topic.
  • Basic prerequisites: a laptop with the corresponding software/tools installed, and a working knowledge (this knowledge could be acquired from experience or by attending to Level 2 workshops) of the topic that will be discussed in depth (basics of that topic will scarcely be mentioned before diving into deeper concepts).
  • Learning outcomes: have a detailed and clear understanding of the topic or software/tool discussed.

Advanced topics: local experts (either [U]Tech instructors or guests) will teach even deeper concepts or uses of a tool so that. These workshops are intended for advanced users with a lot of experience. These workshops could complement Level 3 workshops as well. 

  • Intended audience: students, faculty and anyone who wants learn specific topics that will complement the acquired knowledge in Level 3. Specially recommended to HPC cluster users.
  • Basic prerequisites: a laptop with the corresponding software/tools installed, and a working knowledge (either from experience or by attending to Level 3 workshops).
  • Learning outcomes: learn how to use some of the tools that make use of the cluster resources and to use them wisely.

The aim of bootcamps is to train new users and make them familiar with the HPC cluster environment. Current users of the HPC cluster could attend to the bootcamps to educate themselves about the new updates to the cluster environment. 

Bootcamps are designed using other training seminars from levels 1, 2, and 3. While training seminars are intended to be about one-hour long, the bootcamps can be four-hour long. 

  • Intended audience: (new) users of the HPC cluster who want to learn about our cluster environment or current users that need a refresh.
  • Basic prerequisites: A laptop with software to create a remote connection to the HPC cluster.
  • Learning outcomes: have a good and detailed understanding on how the HPC cluster works, and knowledge on how to use the resources effectively.