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Siegal Lifelong Learning

Upcoming Events

Upcoming Events

April 2017

Thursday, April 6 | 7–8:30 p.m.

 

  • Barry Romich, Philanthropist
  • Robin Wisner Romich, Philanthropist
  • Gayle Noble, Philanthropist
  • David Noble, Philanthropist

Moderator: Brian Amkraut, Executive Director, Siegal Lifelong Learning, CWRU

 

There is an art to philanthropy and a journey of self-discovery inherent in the process of arriving at the conscious decision to give back in a meaningful way to one's community. In this discussion, panelists will share their stories of philanthropy, how they arrived at the decision to give, what their legacy and vision were, how to choose organizations and the challenges philanthropists face when donating.

 

Landmark Centre | Members: $45; Nonmembers: $60 (includes refreshments) | REGISTER >

 

Thursday, April 13 | noon–1:30 p.m.

 

Michael Goldberg, Assistant Professor of Design and Innovation, CWRU

 

How did Cleveland grow entrepreneurship through support from government, donors and the private sector? How did this become a global model and why?

 

Judson Park | Lifelong Learning Members: $25; Nonmembers: $30 (includes lunch) | REGISTER >

Tuesday, April 18 5:30 p.m.

 

Glenn Starkman, Professor of Physics and Astronomy; Director, Institute for the Science of Origins, CWRU 

 

Neutrinos may be oddest of all the fundamental particles of nature. Almost a century after their prediction, and sixty years after they were first detected (by a future chair of the CWRU Physics department and his collaborators), we know that they come in three varieties (flavors) that change into one another as they travel through space, but we have yet to measure their masses or other important properties. We will learn what we do know about neutrinos and how we learned it, and highlight some of the most interesting remaining mysteries. 

 

Program Schedule:
5:30 p.m. – Coffee and Sign-In
6 p.m. – Lecture
7 p.m. – Dinner with OSS faculty and fellows
7:30 p.m. – Q&A and Dessert

 

Cleveland Museum of Natural History | Members: $40; Nonmembers: $48 | REGISTER >

Tuesday, April 18
6:30-8 p.m.

 

Panelists: 

  • David Crampton, PhD, Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences, Case Western Reserve University
  • Edward L. Gilbert, Author, Attorney & Foster Care advocate
  • Kate Lodge, Vice President of Strategic Initiatives and Executive Director of A Place 4 Me, YWCA Greater Cleveland
  • Betsie Norris, Executive Director, Adoption Network Cleveland

Moderator: Phillip Morris, The Plain Dealer

 

This panel will examine the issues faced by the foster care system in Northeast Ohio. Some argue that courts and aid workers are being overwhelmed by state funding cuts and issues such as the growing opioid epidemic. Our panel of experts in different areas of the field will discuss this and more.

 

Co-sponsored by the League of Women Voters of Greater Cleveland, Advance Ohio, Cuyahoga County Public Library, Lakewood Public Library, Cleveland Heights-University Heights Public Library, Solon Community Center, and corporate sponsor, First Interstate Properties, Ltd.

 

Lakewood Public Library, Main Branch | Free (advanced registration recommended) | REGISTER >

 

Wednesday, April 19 | Noon–1:30 p.m.

 

Samantha Baskind, Professor of Art History, Cleveland State University

 

The presentation discusses the large Jewish presence in comics created by Jews, as well as in graphic novels (Spiegelman's Pulitzer prize winning novel Maus among many others). It places the works in question in their social, political and religious context.

 

Landmark Centre | Members: $20; Nonmembers: $25 (includes lunch) | REGISTER >

 

Monday, April 24
9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.

 

Speaker: Jeanne Colleran, Provost and Academic Vice President, John Carroll University

 

Book: Mothering Sunday: A Romance by Graham Swift

 

Suburban Temple-Kol Ami | ACE Members: $30; Nonmembers: $40 | REGISTER >

 

Monday, April 24 | 7 p.m.

Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, Professor of Performance Studies at New York University's Tisch School of the Arts


Facing the “Monument to the Ghetto Heroes” on the site of the Warsaw ghetto and prewar Jewish neighborhood, POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews completes a memorial complex. The monument honors those who died by remembering how they died. And the museum honors them – and those who came before and after – by remembering how they lived. This illustrated lecture explores the creation of POLIN Museum’s multimedia narrative exhibition, a journey of a thousand years, and its role as an agent of transformation that can move an entire society forward.


The Temple-Tifereth Israel (26000 Shaker Blvd.) | Free (advanced registration recommended) | REGISTER >

Made possible by a generous grant from the Salo W. and Jeanette M. Baron Foundation and with support from the Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage and The Temple-Tifereth Israel

Tuesday, April 25 | 5:30 p.m.

 

Paul Butler, Staff Scientist, The Carnegie Institution for Science 

 

Over the past 20 years more than a thousand extrasolar planets have been found! Dr. Butler and his collaborators are building precise systems to survey the nearest stars and have found hundreds of planets, including 5 of the first 6 planets, the first saturn-mass planet, the first neptune-mass planet, the first terrestrial mass planet, and the first multiple planet system. In August 2016, they announced the discovery of a potentially habitable planet around the nearest star, Proxima Centauri. This discovery highlights the latest statistical evidence from Kepler and ground-based Doppler surveys that some 30% of stars have potentially habitable planets! 

 

Program Schedule:
5:30 p.m. – Coffee and Sign-In
6 p.m. – Lecture
7 p.m. – Dinner with OSS faculty and fellows
7:30 p.m. – Q&A and Dessert

 

Tinkham Veale University Center, CWRU campus | Members: $40; Nonmembers: $48 | REGISTER >

 

Outside, Inside: Exploring Boundaries Opening Reception for the Jewish Arts and Culture Lab Exhibit

Tuesday, April 25 | 7-9 p.m.

 

This exhibition represents the culmination of the fifth annual Cleveland Jewish Arts and Culture Fellowship. This year, talented artists from all segments of the local Jewish community met over the course of eight months to study, discuss and draw inspiration from the theme "Exploring Boundaries: Outside and Inside" using classical and contemporary Jewish sources. Opening remarks delivered by Alanna Cooper, Director of Jewish Lifelong Learning, CWRU.

 

Mandel Jewish Community Center | Free

Presented in partnership with the Mandel Jewish Community Center

May 2017

Tuesday, May 2 | 5:30 p.m.

 

Ben Monreal, Associate Professor of Physics, CWRU 

 

Neutrinos were first detected in 1956 coming out of a nuclear reactor at Savannah River, South Carolina, by Clyde Cowan and Fred Reines, soon thereafter chair of Physics at CWRU, who won the 1995 Nobel Prize for this discovery. Since then, we have discovered that there are three flavors of neutrino--electron, muon and tau. We have detected them coming from the sun, but only at half the rate we expected, and from a distant supernova, right here in Cleveland. We have learned that one flavor of neutrino can turn into another, a mixing phenomenon that strongly suggested very unexpectedly that they have mass. We have yet to detect that mass despite decades of trying, but a new technique may allow us to pin down the electron neutrino's mass by very carefully measuring the neutrinos produced in the decay of tritium, the heaviest isotope of hydrogen. Unless the cosmologists beat us to it. 

 

Program Schedule:
5:30 p.m. – Coffee and Sign-In
6 p.m. – Lecture
7 p.m. – Dinner with OSS faculty and fellows
7:30 p.m. – Q&A and Dessert

 

Tinkham Veale University Center, CWRU campus | Members: $40; Nonmembers: $48 | REGISTER >

Tuesday, May 9 | 5:30 p.m.

 

Patricia Princehouse, Director, Program in Evolutionary Biology; Outreach Director, Institute for the Science of Origins 

 

The polar seas are home to a stunning array of unusual animals with unique adaptations such as icefish, whose blood contains an antifreeze solution they make within their bodies. Weird organisms eke out an existence deep within hot springs. How do such quirks, oddities and anomalies evolve? How can the blind process of natural selection produce such successful adaptations? 

 

Program Schedule:
5:30 p.m. – Coffee and Sign-In
6 p.m. – Lecture
7 p.m. – Dinner with OSS faculty and fellows
7:30 p.m. – Q&A and Dessert

 

Tinkham Veale University Center, CWRU campus | Members: $40; Nonmembers: $48 | REGISTER >

 

Tuesday, May 9
7-8:30 p.m.

 

Panelists:

  • Joyce Braverman, Director of Development, City of Shaker Heights (tentative)
  • Mansfield Frazier, Journalist, Business Owner and Hough Resident
  • Wayne Mortensen, Director Of Design, Cleveland Neighborhood Progress
  • Rick Semersky, Developer/CEO, VIP Restoration, Inc.

 

Moderator: Terry Schwartz, Director, Cleveland Urban Design Collab., Kent State University

 

Cleveland’s east side/west side rivalry is a tired cliché—one that’s counterproductive to our ability to move forward as a region. Major investments and new opportunities exist on both sides of the river. But there are some key differences. Some of the most exciting recent developments (Hingetown! Gordon Square! The Lakewood Solstice Steps!) are west of the river. And many of Cleveland’s most distressed neighborhoods lie to the east.

This forum will explore established development strongholds on the east side, as well as emerging neighborhoods. What are the progress indicators and how can we advance development prospects and public space investments in ways that benefit the broader community? Panelists include people directly involved in the hopeful, and sometimes frustrating work of regenerating city neighborhoods and inner-ring suburbs. The forum will highlight current efforts and engage participants in a conversation about local and regional priorities.

 

Co-sponsored by the League of Women Voters of Greater Cleveland, Advance Ohio, Cuyahoga County Public Library, Lakewood Public Library, Cleveland Heights-University Heights Public Library, Solon Community Center, and corporate sponsor, First Interstate Properties, Ltd.

 

Cleveland Heights-University Height Public Library | Free | REGISTER >

 

Tuesday, May 9 | 7 p.m.

 

Ayelet Tsabari, Author

 

Ayelet Tsabari, author of award winning The Best Place on Earth will speak about growing up as an ethnic minority (Mizrahi) in Israel, and about reclaiming her Yemeni identity through writing. She will share the unique challenges she has faced as an immigrant author in North America, writing about Israel in English, her second language.


Landmark Centre | Members: free (advanced registration recommended); Nonmembers: $5 | REGISTER >

Wednesday, May 10 | 10 a.m.

 

Ayelet Tsabari, Author

 

Israeli literature has long been dominated by Ashkenazi authors. Likewise, Israeli school curriculums often dismiss the work of Mizrahi authors (those of non-European descent) from the canon. But today, a new generation of Mizrahi writers are determined to carve out their own space, and perhaps even change the landscape of Israel’s literary scene. Reflecting on her own work and those like her, Ayelet Tsabari will shed light on the changing face of Israeli literature, and introduce some of the new Mizrahi voices who are making their mark.


Landmark Centre | Members: free (advanced registration recommended); Nonmembers: $5 | REGISTER >

Wednesday, May 10 | 4-6 p.m.

 

Ayelet Tsabari, Author

 

An informal discussion for Cleveland's Hebrew speakers. Join author Ayelet Tsabari who will speak about her work and life growing up Mizrahi in Israel and as an Israeli writer in North America. Registration Required by May 3. Tea and pastries will be served.


Landmark Centre | Members and Nonmembers: $5 | REGISTER >

Thursday, May 11 | 10 a.m
 

Ayelet Tsabari, Author

 

How do writers turn lived experience into literary art? What makes for a great true life narrative? Do you have to live an extraordinary life to write nonfiction? Learn to locate the stories in your lives, apply fiction techniques to enhance your work, and experiment with form, structure, tense and voice. Discussion and writing exercises will focus on finding your theme, identifying the conflict, confronting your fears, and falling in love with revision. In this workshop, Ayelet Tsabari offers ten practical tips to help you refine your prose, deepen your understanding of the genre, and create stronger and more compelling non-fiction. Space is Limited

 

Landmark Centre | Members: $10; Nonmembers: $15 | REGISTER >

 

 

Tuesday, May 16 | 5:30 p.m.

 

Peter Faulhaber, Professor of Radiology, CWRU; Director, Clinical PET University Hospitals 

 

Where once there were just X-rays, now there is a wide range of imaging technologies applicable to different tissues and different diagnostic purposes. In this session, we will learn the latest about Computed Tomography (CT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET). There are even combined machines, such as PET/CT. What are they? How are they used, alone or in combinations in oncology, neurology, and cardiology? What does the future hold for medical imaging? 

 

Program Schedule:
5:30 p.m. – Coffee and Sign-In
6 p.m. – Lecture
7 p.m. – Dinner with OSS faculty and fellows
7:30 p.m. – Q&A and Dessert

 

Tinkham Veale University Center, CWRU campus | Members: $40; Nonmembers: $48 | REGISTER >

 

Tuesday, May 16 | 7-8:30 p.m.

 

Panelists: 

  • Michael Chadsey, Ohio Oil and Gas Association
  • Trent Dougherty, Ohio Environmental Council
  • Edward “Ned” Hill, John Glenn College of Public Affairs, The Ohio State University

Moderator: Dan Shingler, Crain's Cleveland Business

 

Co-sponsored by the League of Women Voters of Greater Cleveland, Advance Ohio, Cuyahoga County Public Library, Lakewood Public Library, Cleveland Heights-University Heights Public Library, Solon Community Center, and corporate sponsor, First Interstate Properties, Ltd.

 

Solon Community Center (35000 Portz Pkwy) | free | REGISTER >

 

Wednesday, May 17 | 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.

 

Martha Bifano, Tour Guide

Wayne Bifano, Tour Guide

 

The Cathedral is celebrating its 200th Anniversary on Sunday, November 6, 2016. The tour will involve the history of the cathedral, learning about the organ, viewing cathedral architecture, learning about current plumbing and electrical which is providing a "green" environment, taking a walk on the connection to diocesan offices, and seeing and learning other important features of this grand old cathedral on what was once called Millionaires Row.   Schedule:  Arrival at 11:30AM ,  Brown Bag Lunch 12-1PM,  Tour 1:30-2:30PM

 

Trinity Cathedral | ACE members: $25; Nonmembers: $30 (Prices include lunch, concert and tour) | REGISTER >

 

Thursday, May 18 | noon–1:30 p.m.

 

Don Rosenberg, President of the Music Critics Association of North America and Editor of EMAg, the Magazine of Early Music America

 

The Musical has roots in European Opera and Operettas, but became a distinctly American art form in the 20th century. Whether frivolous or provoking, musicals have entertained audiences and often touch on universal themes.

 

Judson Park | Lifelong Learning Members: $25; Nonmembers: $30 (includes lunch) | REGISTER >

Tuesday, May 23 | 5:30 p.m.

 

Mark Grisworld, Director of the Interactive Commons and Professor of Radiology, CWRU 

 

Virtual reality has become interactive! New technologies such as the Microsoft HoloLens are allowing us to augment our daily experience of the world with holograms that add education, design and entertainment to our lives and work. 

 

Program Schedule:
5:30 p.m. – Coffee and Sign-In
6 p.m. – Lecture
7 p.m. – Dinner with OSS faculty and fellows
7:30 p.m. – Q&A and Dessert

 

Cleveland Museum of Natural History | Members: $40; Nonmembers: $48 | REGISTER >

 

Wednesday, May 24 | 7 p.m.

 

Benny Morris, Aaron and Cecile Goldman Visiting Israeli Professor, Department of Government, Georgetown University

 

Nothing is as bad as a great defeat - except a great victory. The 1967 War established Israel as a regional power and led to the firming up of its alliance with the USA. But it also challenged the neighboring Arab states to regain their lost territories, leading to subsequent wars. Ultimately, Israel withdrew from the Sinai and peace with Egypt was attained. But the war also left Israel in possession of the West Bank and Gaza Strip - and it has been unable to disgorge these territories ever since, auguring the emergence of a binational Jewish-Arab state, an anathema to most Zionists.

 

Landmark Centre | Members: free (advanced registration recommended); Nonmembers: $5 | REGISTER >

 

Tuesday, May 30 | 5:30 p.m.

 

Mike Martens, Professor of Physics, CWRU

 

The answer is both in the MRI machine and in your body! Learn about the giant magnets in the MRI scanner, the tiny magnets in your body, and how they interact with each other to form the beautiful images we see today.

 

Program Schedule:
5:30 p.m. – Coffee and Sign-In
6 p.m. – Lecture
7 p.m. – Dinner with OSS faculty and fellows
7:30 p.m. – Q&A and Dessert

 

Cleveland Museum of Natural History | Members: $40; Nonmembers: $48 | REGISTER >

 

June 2017

Thursday, June 8 | noon–1:30 p.m.

 

Brian Amkraut, Executive Director of Lifelong Learning, CWRU

 

In June 1967, Israelis and Jews around the world were first petrified of imminent destruction followed by euphoria over a tremendous military victory. Half a century later, those six days in 1967 still help shape the geopolitics of the Middle East. This brief analysis unpacks contemporary perspectives on the 6-Day War.

 

Judson Park | Lifelong Learning Members: $25; Nonmembers: $30 (includes lunch) | REGISTER >

Monday, June 12 | 7 p.m.

 

Menachem Z. Rosensaft, General Counsel of the World Jewish Congress

 

Menachem Rosensaft, a friend, student, disciple and colleague of Elie Wiesel for over 55 years, will discuss the significance of the Nobel Peace Prize laureate's writings and teachings to our generation and those to come.

 

Landmark Centre | Members: free (advanced registration recommended); Nonmembers: $5 | REGISTER >

Tuesday, June 13 | noon-1:30 p.m.

 

Menachem Z. Rosensaft, General Counsel of the World Jewish Congress

 

Drawing on the experiences and reactions of a wide range of children and grandchildren of Holocaust survivors – including theologians, scholars, authors, artists, media personalities and community leaders – Menachem Rosensaft will speak about the ways that Holocaust memory is transmitted to future generations. And reflecting on his own experiences as the son of two survivors of Auschwitz and Bergen-Belsen, he explores how these memories can and must be perpetuated.


Landmark Centre | Members: $20; Nonmembers: $25 (includes lunch) | REGISTER >

Friday, June 16 | 11:30 a.m - 1:30 p.m.

 

Historic Movie Theaters of Downtown Cleveland  

Alan Dutka, Local Historian


The first movie theaters in Cleveland consisted of converted storefronts with sawed-off telephone poles substituting for chairs and bed sheets acting as screens. In 1905, Clevelanders marveled at moving images shown at Rafferty's Monkey House while they dodged real monkeys and raccoons that wandered freely through the bar. By the early 1920s, a collection of marvelous movie palaces like the Stillman and Euclid Theaters lined Euclid Avenue, but they survived for just two generations or less. Clevelanders united to save the State, Ohio, Allen, Palace, and Hanna Theaters as wrecking balls converged for demolition. Those that remain now compose one of the nation's largest performing arts centers. Alan Dutka shares the remarkable histories of Cleveland's downtown movie theaters and their reemergence as community landmarks.

 

Cleveland Skating Club (2500 Kemper Rd.) | ACE members: $35; Nonmembers: $40 | REGISTER >

 

Monday, June 19 | 7 p.m.

 

David Schlitt, Director of the Rauh Jewish History Program and Archives at the Heinz History Center

 

What can we learn about Elie Wiesel from his letters sent and received in his ‘mother tongue’? How do language and medium shape the way we perceive, understand and remember him? In this lecture, David Schlitt, Director of the Rauh Jewish History Program & Archives at the Sen. John Heinz History Center, discusses his experience as the Yiddish-language archivist for Boston University’s Elie Wiesel Archives, and the lessons he learned from the ‘kleyne pitshevkes’ – the seeming minutiae of the collection.


Landmark Centre | Members: free (advanced registration recommended); Nonmembers: $5 | REGISTER >

Monday, June 26 | 7 p.m
 

Nehemia Polen, Professor of Jewish Thought, Hebrew College

 

Most widely known for his Holocaust writings, Elie Wiesel’s engagement with Biblical, Rabbinic, and Hasidic texts were also central to his life’s work. Through study, teaching and writing, he dedicated himself to lifting up the classical Jewish tradition that was shattered in the wake of the Holocaust. Wiesel captured the central messages of these texts, repositioned them, and made them widely accessible. Join Nehemia Polen, student of Elie Wiesel, who explores Wiesel’s influences and his impact.

 

Landmark Centre | Members: free (advanced registration recommended); Nonmembers: $5 | REGISTER >

 

 

July 2017

Thursday, July 13 | noon–1:30 p.m.

 

Joseph White, Luxenberg Family Professor of Public Policy, CWRU

 

Long before President-elect Trump's victory, Congressional Republicans endorsed radical reforms to the government's role in financing health care: repeal of the Affordable Care Act, block-granting Medicaid, and turning Medicare into a voucher program with all insurance provided by private insurance companies, instead of the government itself being the primary insurer for most beneficiaries. In this session, participants will discuss the achievements of, prospects for, and possible consequences of those changes, as of the date of the discussion.

 

Judson Park | Lifelong Learning Members: $25; Nonmembers: $30 (includes lunch) | REGISTER >

Friday, July 14 | 11:30 a.m - 1:30 p.m.

 

Best of One Tank Trips: Great Getaway Ideas In and Around Ohio 

Neil ZurcherTV Travel Reporter

 

Discover the best and most unusual getaway ideas in and around Ohio!

 

Cleveland Skating Club (2500 Kemper Rd.) | ACE members: $35; Nonmembers: $40 | REGISTER > 

August 2017

Friday, August 18 | 11:30 a.m - 1:30 p.m.

 

Kindertransport: A Rescued Child 

Mimi Ormond, Author

 

Mimi Ormond's autobiographical book Kindertransport: A Rescued Child, deals with her escape from the Nazis on the lifesaving trains.

 

Cleveland Skating Club (2500 Kemper Rd.) | ACE members: $35; Nonmembers: $40 | REGISTER >