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Upcoming Events

Upcoming Events

February 2018

Tuesday, February 20 | 5:30 p.m.

 

3rd Annual Cleveland Women in Science and Medicine Discussion Series

Women leaders are required to function in a manner consistent with both gender role and leadership role expectations — which are often contradictory and place women in a double bind.

Our discussion will feature Dr. Diane Bergeron (Case Western Reserve University) who will provide a brief overview of the research on role expectations — gender, leadership, minority, scientist — and how they contribute to women’s double bind. This will be followed by an interactive panel discussion that includes a diverse group of thought leaders in Cleveland. Together we will understand how role expectations limit organizations' ability to benefit from the entire talent pool, exchange successful tactics, and return to our workplaces with new strategies to untangle the double bind many women face.

 

PANELISTS
Dr. Ka-Pi Hoh, Operations Manager, Lubrizol
Dr. Tom Mihaljevic, CEO, Cleveland Clinic
Dr. Denise Su, Curator and Head of Paleobotany & Paleoecology, Cleveland Museum of Natural History
Dr. Cyrus Taylor, Dean, College of Arts and Sciences, Case Western Reserve University
Terri Wimms, Executive Director, Hospice Operations, Kindred Hospice

 

Cleveland Museum of Natural History | Cleveland Museum of Natural History Members: $10; Public: $20 |

For more information or to buy tickets, go to https://www.cmnh.org/calendar/cleveland-women-in-science-and-medicine-discussion

Students (grade school through grad school) may call the box office at 216-231-1177 to reserve complimentary tickets, courtesy of the Women's Committee of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History

 

Wednesday, February 21 | 7-8:30 p.m.

 

Moderator: Steven Litt, Plain Dealer, Art, Architecture, Urban Design and City Planning Reporter

 

The Opportunity Corridor provides a connection between west and east sides; through neighborhoods that would benefit from economic renewal. It has been condemned, extolled, and now is becoming a reality. But what will it do in reality?

 

The Northeast Ohio Public Policy forums are co-sponsored by the Case Western Reserve University Siegal Lifelong Learning Program, League of Women Voters-Greater Cleveland, Cleveland.com/Plain Dealer. Plus Heights, Lakewood and Cuyahoga County Library Systems. Corporate sponsor: First Interstate Properties, Ltd.

 

Tinkham Veale University Center Ballroom | Free and open to the public (advanced registration recommended) | REGISTER >

 

Wednesday, February 21 | 7 p.m.

 

Alanna Cooper, Director of Jewish Lifelong Learning, CWRU

 

In November 2017, Museum of the Bible, a $500 million privately funded institution, opened its doors to the public. Situated in Washington, D.C., just two blocks from the National Mall, the museum’s mission is to “engage people with the Bible.” Despite this neutral statement, debate swirls around its religious and political agenda, the provenance and authenticity of its artifacts, and the exclusion of many religious traditions from its narrative. Cultural anthropologist Alanna Cooper weighs in, drawing on a Jewish angle to examine the museum’s use of Jewish heritage, which includes the exhibition of Torah scrolls from around the world, and a live scribe who is publicly engaged in the ritual act of writing a Torah scroll.

 

Landmark CentreLifelong Learning Members: free; Nonmembers: $5 | Advance registration required | REGISTER >

 

Monday, February 26 | noon–1:30 p.m.

 

Elina Gertsman, Department of Art History and Art Core Faculty, Women's and Gender Studies Program, CWRU

 

This lecture will explore the highlights of the CMA's world-renowned collection of medieval art. We will look at the Jonah marbles, the Byzantine textile icon,the objects that form part of the Guelph Treasure, Romanesque and Gothic sculptures, late medieval paintings and manuscripts, and the famous fountain automaton.

 

Judson Park | Lifelong Learning Members: $25; Nonmembers: $30 (includes lunch) | REGISTER >

Monday, December 11-Tuesday, March 6
 
Thinking of sunnier days? 
 
Step into the lush watercolors of En Plein Air Paintings from CWRU Squire Valleevue And Valley Farm on view in the Gallery@KSL space on the 1st floor of Kelvin Smith Library from December 11, 2017 through March 6, 2018. This exhibit features over 30 works from the Siegal Lifelong Learning Program at Case Western Reserve University’s Painting in the Outdoors class from summer/fall 2017. 
 
A Meet-the-Artist reception is scheduled for Thursday, January 25, 2018 from 5-7 pm; the exhibit and reception are free and open to the public.

 

Kelvin Smith Library, CWRU | Free and open to the public 

March 2018

Thursday, March 8 | 6:30-8 p.m.

 

A discussion with experts at the national and local level about ways to protect yourself from common consumer scams and how to respond if they do strike.

Moderated by Teresa Dixon-Murray, Reporter/ Banking & Personal Finance, The Plain Dealer

Panelists:

  • Larissa Bungo, Assistant Regional Director, Federal Trade Commission
  • Sheryl Harris, Director, Consumer Affairs, Cuyahoga County
  • Sue McConnell, President, Better Business Bureau-Cleveland

 

 

 

Co-sponsored by the Case Western Reserve University Siegal Lifelong Learning Program, League of Women Voters-Greater Cleveland, Cleveland.com/Plain Dealer. Plus Heights, Lakewood and Cuyahoga County Library Systems. Corporate sponsor: First Interstate Properties, Ltd.

 

Lakewood Public Library, Main Branch | Free (advanced registration recommended) | REGISTER >

Monday, March 12 | noon–1:30 p.m.

 

Brian Redmond, Curator and John Otis Hower Chair of Archaeology, Cleveland Museum of Natural History

 

Before Europeans set foot in what is now Ohio, Native American cultures thrived for more than 13,000 years. Since no written records were ever made by these ancient Ohioans, our only way to study this past is through the science of archaeology.

In this presentation, Dr. Redmond will discuss some of the scientific evidence that provides a rich history of these ancient societies from the end of the Ice Age to the arrival of Europeans.



Judson Park | Lifelong Learning Members: $25; Nonmembers: $30 (includes lunch) | REGISTER >

Monday, March 12 | 7 p.m.

 

Roy Horovitz, Actor and Director

 

One of Israel’s foremost actors and directors presents on the history, scope and themes of contemporary theater in Israel. Combining live readings, screenings and dramatic lecture, Roy Horovitz addresses the multicultural aspects of the Israeli theater, the country’s preoccupation with Holocaust memory, the recent amplification of the feminine voice, and the multilingual stage, which makes room for Hebrew, Arabic, English, Russian and Amharic.

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: free; Nonmembers: $5 | Advance registration required | REGISTER >

Roy Horovitz's residency is made possible by The Schusterman Visiting Israeli Artists Program 

Thursday, March 15 | 7 p.m.

 

Amy-Jill Levine, University Professor of New Testament and Jewish Studies and Mary Jane Werthan Professor of Jewish Studies at Vanderbilt Divinity School and College of Arts and Sciences

 

Although Jews and Christians share common books–the Jewish Tanakh and the Christian Old Testament–we read our shared stories in different ways. Differences in translation, punctuation, definitions, theology, emphasis and even canonical order all lead to differences in community self–definition. What prompts these differences, and what do they suggest about Jewish and Christian priorities? Among the items to be discussed: the "virgin birth," Isaiah's "suffering servant," the deity who speaks in the plural in Genesis ("Let us make humankind in our image”), and the events in the Garden of Eden ("original sin" or "human nature”).

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: free; Nonmembers: $5 | Advance registration required | REGISTER >

This program is made possible and sponsored by the Association of Jewish Studies Distinguished Lectureship Program

Friday, March 16 | noon–1:30 p.m.

 

Amy-Jill Levine, University Professor of New Testament and Jewish Studies and Mary Jane Werthan Professor of Jewish Studies at Vanderbilt Divinity School and College of Arts and Sciences

 

Some Christians view Judaism as proclaiming a God of wrath, xenophobic, money–loving, militaristic and misogynist; some Jews view Christianity as interested only in doctrine and not good works, a pagan myth, a misreading of the Tanakh, and at heart anti–Semitic. How do these misconceptions arise? What impact do they have on interfaith relations in general and the conversation about the Middle East in particular? How might they be corrected?

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: $20; Nonmembers: $25 (includes lunch) | Advance registration required | REGISTER >

 

Monday, March 19 | 7-8:30 p.m.

 

Tribe Talk is an edgy, informative, and engaging monthly conversation on trending Jewish news led by Brian Amkraut and Alanna Cooper, our resident Jewish news-junkies.

 

Featured Guest of the Month: Debbie Hoffman, Former National President of National Council of Jewish Women

Moderators: Brian Amkraut, Executive Director, Siegal Lifelong Learning and Alanna Cooper, Director of Jewish Lifelong Learning, CWRU

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members & Nonmembers: Free (advanced registration recommended) REGISTER >

 

Co-sponsored by the Cleveland Jewish News and the CJN Foundation

Tuesday, March 20 | 7-8:30 p.m.

 

Moderator: Rich Exner, Cleveland.com Reporter

Panelists:
David Daley, Political Writer
Catherine Turcer, Common Cause/Ohio, more

 

This forum will look at the Redistricting issue from a national and local perspective with experts in each area on the panel.

 

The Northeast Ohio Public Policy forums are co-sponsored by the Case Western Reserve University Siegal Lifelong Learning Program, League of Women Voters-Greater Cleveland, Cleveland.com/Plain Dealer. Plus Heights, Lakewood and Cuyahoga County Library Systems. Corporate sponsor: First Interstate Properties, Ltd.

 

Landmark Centre | Free and open to the public (advanced registration recommended) REGISTER >

 

Tuesday, March 27 | 7 p.m.

 

Andrea Peck, Adjunct Professor, Cuyahoga Community College; Group Facilitator; Author

 

"Frankly, there isn’t anyone you couldn’t love, once you know their story." - Mr. Rogers

Stories are engaging. They connect us with others regardless of our racial, religious, cultural, or gender differences. They imprint life-long lasting memories, and they impact how we interpret and experience the world. Learn about their history, the valuable role they play in all of our lives, and identify the important stories in your own life.

This lecture serves as a preview to the course beginning April 10.

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members & Nonmembers: free | REGISTER >

April 2018

Monday, April 9 | 7 p.m.

 

David Grossman, Israeli Author

 
Join David Grossman, Israel's most celebrated writer, winner of countless awards, and the only Israeli ever to win the prestigious Man Booker International Prize. His novel A Horse Walks into a Bar is haunting in both its effortless dexterity and dynamic contradiction.  The book is set in a comedy club in a small Israeli town where an audience awaits an evening of amusement, but instead become witness to the comedian’s personal hell. Grossman addresses human suffering, society, truth, and love – all of the most surprising and breathtaking aspects of the human condition.
 
 
Maltz Performing Arts Center, 1855 Ansel Road, Cleveland
 
Reservations required through Maltz Performing Arts Center; call 216–368–6062 to buy tickets over the phone or go to https://goo.gl/D65x2u to purchase tickets online.
 
Member of Lifelong Learning cost: $18/$75 (premium); Nonmember cost: $28/$95 (premium)
 
Premium reservation cost includes reception with David Grossman prior to the lecture, reserved seating and valet parking
 
David Grossman’s visit is supported by the Herbert and Mariana Luxenberg Siegal College Lecture Fund of the Jewish Federation of Cleveland and the Israel Arts Connection of the Jewish Federation of Cleveland

Thursday, April 12 | 7 p.m.

 

Samantha Baskind, Professor of Art History at Cleveland State University

 

On Passover eve, April 19, 1943, Jews in the Warsaw Ghetto staged the now legendary revolt against their Nazi oppressors. Since that day, the deprivation and despair of life in the ghetto and the dramatic uprising of its inhabitants have captured the American cultural imagination. Samantha Baskind looks at how the ghetto and its remarkable story have been told, retold, and remembered in fine art, film, television, radio, theater, fiction and comics. Her talk includes iconic works such as Leon Uris’ best–selling novel Mila 18, Roman Polanski’s Academy Award-winning film The Pianist, and a teleplay by Twilight Zone creator Rod Serling, alongside other expressions in popular culture, including Superman comics.

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: free; Nonmembers: $5 | Advance registration required | REGISTER >

 

Monday, April 16 | 7-8:30 p.m.

 

Tribe Talk is an edgy, informative, and engaging monthly conversation on trending Jewish news led by Brian Amkraut and Alanna Cooper, our resident Jewish news-junkies.

 

Featured Guest of the Month: Eric Fingerhut, President and CEO of Hillel International

Moderators: Brian Amkraut, Executive Director, Siegal Lifelong Learning and Alanna Cooper, Director of Jewish Lifelong Learning, CWRU

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members & Nonmembers: Free (advanced registration recommended) | REGISTER >

 

Co-sponsored by the Cleveland Jewish News and the CJN Foundation

Tuesday, April 17 5:30 p.m.

 

Isaiah Nengo, Department of Biological Anthropology, Turkana Basin Institute

 

In 2015, paleoanthropologist Isaiah Nengo's team discovered the 13 million-year-old skull of a baby ape in Turkana. Dubbed Alesi, the new species may be the ancestor of all great apes and humans. Joining forces with physicists, Nengo used unprecedented cutting-edge synchrotron technology to glean new kinds of data never before available for a fossil hominoid specimen. Come hear about this amazing ape and its amazing discovery!

 

Program Schedule:
5:30 p.m. – Coffee and Sign-In
6 p.m. – Lecture
7 p.m. – Dinner with OSS faculty and fellows
7:30 p.m. – Q&A and Dessert

 

CWRU, Tinkham Veale University Center | Lifelong Learning Members: $42; Nonmembers: $48 | REGISTER >

Friday, April 20 | Noon–1:30 p.m.

 

Barbara Greenberg, Magistrate for the Division of Small Claims for the Bedford Municipal Court and a Magistrate for the Cuyahoga County Juvenile Court Community Division Program

 

What constitutes sexual harassment? Is accusation enough or do you need proof? How many people need to accuse to make it real, or is one enough? Do the same rules apply to everyone or are public figures held to a higher standard? Is it fair to be tried in the media? How can we hope to get fair legislation? Barbara Greenberg will present some legal background and lead an open forum to examine this serious issue.

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: $20; Nonmembers: $25 (includes lunch)  | Advance registration required REGISTER >

 

Monday, April 23 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m.

 

Get ready for a unique experience. You’ll be amazed, confounded, and ultimately dazzled by "Lincoln in the Bardo" by George Saunders.

Winner of the prestigious Man Booker Prize, universally hailed by critics as one of the most riveting books of 2017, "Lincoln in the Bardo" is by turns quirky, funny, and heartbreaking. The style is a hybrid of drama, biography, history, and fantasy woven skillfully into a narrative about a dark chapter in the life of Abraham Lincoln.

“The saddest man in the world” confronts the death of his beloved son Willie, while the Civil War rages, ripping the country apart, the preservation of the Union by no means certain. As he repeatedly visits his dead son in the cemetery, Lincoln is observed by a host of lively spirits trapped in the Bardo, a Tibetan Buddhist name for the transition period between death and rebirth.

Speaker: Steve Pinkerton, Ph.D., Senior Lecturer, CWRU

Book: "Lincoln in the Bardo" by George Saunders.

 

Suburban Temple-Kol Ami | ACE Members: $25; Nonmembers: $30 | REGISTER >

 

Monday, April 23 | noon–1:30 p.m.

 

Alanna Cooper, Director, Jewish Lifelong Learning, CWRU

 

With her 1928 publication of Coming of Age in Samoa - an account of female adolescent sexuality – Margaret Mead became one of America’s most celebrated social scientists. But after her death, her work was exposed as a hoax. What are the implications for how the field of cultural anthropology has developed and how human nature is broadly understood. 

 

Judson Park | Lifelong Learning Members: $25; Nonmembers: $30 (includes lunch) | REGISTER >

Tuesday, April 24 | 5:30 p.m.

 

Harsh Mathur, Department of Physics, Case Western Reserve University

 

Extreme materials are more and more in the news. We hear about breakthroughs in "superconductors" and now "superfluids." Due to the marvels of quantum mechanics, in a superconductor, resistance drops to zero when the material is cooled below a critical temperature. Superfluids flow with absolutely no viscosity, and so no loss of energy. When stirred, they form vortices that continue to rotate indefinitely. Superfluidity may be a property of other exotic states of matter theorized to exist.

 

Program Schedule:
5:30 p.m. – Coffee and Sign-In
6 p.m. – Lecture
7 p.m. – Dinner with OSS faculty and fellows
7:30 p.m. – Q&A and Dessert

 

Cleveland Museum of Natural History | Lifelong Learning Members: $42; Nonmembers: $48 | REGISTER >

Wednesday, April 25 | 6:30-8 p.m.

 

Some think that single payer healthcare is the answer to our healthcare problems and others think it will bankrupt the country and won't work. This forum will explore both sides with a particular emphasis on how it might impact Northeast Ohio.

Moderated by Ginger Christ, The Plain Dealer Healthcare Reporter

Panelists:

  • John R. Corlett, President and Executive Director, The Center for Community Solutions
  • J. B. Silvers, Ph.D. Case Western Reserve University Weatherhead School of Management and School of Medicine

 

Co-sponsored by the Case Western Reserve University Siegal Lifelong Learning Program, League of Women Voters-Greater Cleveland, Cleveland.com/Plain Dealer. Plus Heights, Lakewood and Cuyahoga County Library Systems. Corporate sponsor: First Interstate Properties, Ltd.

 

Lakewood Public Library, Main Branch | Free (advanced registration recommended | REGISTER >

May 2018

Tuesday, May 1 | 5:30 p.m.

 

Nandini Trivedi, Department of Physics, The Ohio State University

 

How do electrons and atoms get organized at very low temperatures and how do new phases of matter emerge? Even a very small attraction between electrons in a metal can cause pairs of them to bind together, achieving unusually low energy. These pairs are responsible for superconductivity -and a Nobel Prize in physics! In certain "exotic" cold materials, ultracold atoms can be trapped and organized using light. Rumor has it that Dr. Trivedi will attempt to perform actual experiments for us during the lecture!

 

Program Schedule:
5:30 p.m. – Coffee and Sign-In
6 p.m. – Lecture
7 p.m. – Dinner with OSS faculty and fellows
7:30 p.m. – Q&A and Dessert

 

CWRU, Tinkham Veale University Center | Lifelong Learning Members: $42; Nonmembers: $48 | REGISTER >

Wednesday, May 2 | 7 p.m.

Avivah Zornberg, Torah Scholar and Author

 

Renowned author and scholar Avivah Zornberg is acclaimed for her innovative approach to studying the Torah through rabbinic, literary and psychoanalytic lenses. Join her presentation on the Biblical figure Ruth, who is a “stranger,” in more senses than one. Who is this unknown woman who is destined to become the mother of royalty? And how does she find her way into a foreign and unwelcoming culture and religious tradition?


Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: free; Nonmembers: $10 | Advance registration required | REGISTER >

Tuesday, May 8 | 5:30 p.m.

 

Yohannes Haile-Selassie, Curator & Head of Physical Anthropology, Cleveland Museum of Natural History

 

Famed paleoanthropologist Yohannes Haile-Selassie is internationally celebrated for his unique ability to understand our primate ancestors. Discoverer of the 4.4 million-year-old species Ardipithecus ramidus, among many other famous specimens, CMNH's curator of physical anthropology continues to make headlines with more and more discoveries from Ethiopia of our evolutionary ancestors. Join us to hear the most up-to-date report of his recent discoveries! 

 

Program Schedule:
5:30 p.m. – Coffee and Sign-In
6 p.m. – Lecture
7 p.m. – Dinner with OSS faculty and fellows
7:30 p.m. – Q&A and Dessert

 

CWRU, Tinkham Veale University Center | Lifelong Learning Members: $42; Nonmembers: $48 | REGISTER >

Thursday, May 10 | 7 p.m.

 

David Engel, Maurice Greenberg Professor of Holocaust Studies; Professor of History, Jewish Studies and Political History, New York University

 

The Jewish Museum in New York offers visitors, in its words, a chance "to examine the Jewish experience as it has evolved from antiquity to the present." The Holocaust occupies only minimal space in the museum's permanent exhibition. It is presented as a sudden interruption in the main path of Jewish history, with no roots in the Jewish past and no long-term effects on the Jewish future. What made a major American Jewish institution decide to represent the Holocaust in this way? What other ways have been proposed for placing the Holocaust within the long span of Jewish history? This lecture explores a surprising, counter-intuitive debate that has been taking place among Jewish scholars and leaders ever since the end of World War II.

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: free; Nonmembers: $5 | Advance registration required | REGISTER >

Friday, May 11 | 10-11:30 a.m.

 

David Engel, Maurice Greenberg Professor of Holocaust Studies; Professor of History, Jewish Studies and Political History, New York University

 

During the 20th century, Poland regained its independence after a long period under foreign conquest. Between the First and Second World Wars it faced unrelenting hostility from its neighbors, who objected to its very existence. It defined itself as the nation-state of the Polish people, yet one–third of its citizens were not ethnically Poles, and many Poles lived in a worldwide diaspora. It also was home to Europe's largest Jewish community. Later, many residents of the State of Israel, including much of its leadership, were Jews who had been raised and educated in Poland. What ideas did those Jews bring with them from Poland to Israel? In what ways did their experience in Poland affect how they thought about Israel as the nation-state of the Jewish people? The lecture points to some striking parallels and differences in the histories of the two countries.


Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: free; Nonmembers: $5 | Advance registration required | REGISTER >

 

Tuesday, May 15 | 10 a.m.-1 p.m.

 

Bellefaire Staff

 

Bellefaire JCB, Ohio’s largest provider of children’s behavioral health services, has been providing services for at-risk youth and their families for nearly 150 years. Opened in 1868 as an orphanage for Jewish children, today Bellefaire serves children of all backgrounds from across the State of Ohio and the nation. In 2000, Bellefaire opened the Monarch Center for Autism on its beautiful 32-acre campus in Shaker Heights. Annually Bellefaire serves over 22,000 youth and their families in programs ranging from residential treatment to community-based programming.

Bellefaire JCB staff will provide an overview of the agency's work and small group tours of programs including The Monarch School for Autism, the Monarch Center for Transitional Education and the Monarch Board Academy (residential program).  (Price includes a boxed lunch)

 

The Wuliger Center at Bellefaire JCB | ACE members: $25; Nonmembers: $30 (Includes a box lunch) | REGISTER >

 

Tuesday, May 15 | 7 p.m.

 

In recent years, the relationship between American Jews and Israel seems to be becoming increasingly divisive. What are the root causes of this issue? Can the divisions be reversed? How might they be addressed, and how does the trend reflect more complex dynamics at play on the global Jewish stage? This panel discussion brings together three outstanding scholars with expertise on both American Jewry and Israel to address these and other questions on the future of Jewish peoplehood.

 

Mandel JCC Stonehill Auditorium | Lifelong Learning Members & Nonmembers: Free | Advance registration encouraged |

REGISTER >

 

Thursday, May 17 | 7 p.m.

 

Jeffrey Veidlinger, Joseph Brodsky Collegiate Professor of History and Judaic Studies and Director of the Frankel Center for Judaic Studies at the University of Michigan

 

Marc Chagall has become the best known of many artists who worked on the Yiddish theater in Russia. This presentation, based on an exhibition at the Jewish Museum of New York, spotlights Chagall and introduces several of the artists who worked in his orbit, examining the ways they became catalysts for modernist experimentation, redefining the concept of theater itself.

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: free; Nonmembers: $5 | Advance registration required | REGISTER >

 

Friday, May 18 | noon–1:30 p.m.

 

Jeffrey Veidlinger, Joseph Brodsky Collegiate Professor of History and Judaic Studies and Director of the Frankel Center for Judaic Studies at the University of Michigan

 

In this presentation, historian Jeffrey Veidlinger draws on his experiences interviewing hundreds of Yiddish speakers in Eastern Europe. He reflects on the uses of oral history to the historian, the intimate details it can reveal about the past, our memories and the things we value most in life.

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: $20; Nonmembers: $25 (includes lunch) | Advance registration required | REGISTER >

 

Tuesday, May 15 | 5:30 p.m.

 

Peter Harte, Department of Genetics, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University 

 

2017's Nobel Prize in Physiology/Medicine was awarded for discovering how fruit flies sleep! Benzer and Konopka demonstrated that mutations in an unknown gene disrupted the circadian clock of flies and named this gene "period." Hall, Rosbash and Young isolated the period gene and discovered that PER, the protein encoded by period, accumulates during the night and degrades during the day, revealing the fascinating way plants, animals and humans adapt their biological "clocks" to be in synchrony with the Earth's revolutions.

 

Program Schedule:
5:30 p.m. – Coffee and Sign-In
6 p.m. – Lecture
7 p.m. – Dinner with OSS faculty and fellows
7:30 p.m. – Q&A and Dessert

 

CWRU, Tinkham Veale University Center | Lifelong Learning Members: $42; Nonmembers: $48 | REGISTER >

Presented in collaboration with the Case Western Reserve University Emeriti Academy, an organization administered through the CWRU Office of the Provost, which is intended to foster closer continuing relationships with emeriti faculty after they retire from full-time employment.

 

Tuesday, May 22 | 5:30 p.m.

 

Fred Turek, Director of the Center for Sleep & Circadian Biology, Charles & Emma Morrison Professor, Northwestern University

 

Is sleep a manifestation of the mind or the brain? Genes interact in complex ways to regulate circadian rhythms and these complexities affect our health in unforeseen ways. The neurochemical, molecular, and cellular events involved arise from a central biological clock located in the brain's hypothalamus. When you sleep and wake can regulate the timing of the circadian clock. Advanced age or unusual sleep-wake patterns can interrupt behavioral and endocrine rhythms, leading to central nervous and other diseases -even affect our intestinal microbiota! Come learn how sleep affects your health!

 

Program Schedule:
5:30 p.m. – Coffee and Sign-In
6 p.m. – Lecture
7 p.m. – Dinner with OSS faculty and fellows
7:30 p.m. – Q&A and Dessert

 

Cleveland Museum of Natural History | Lifelong Learning Members: $42; Nonmembers: $48 | REGISTER >

Presented in collaboration with the Case Western Reserve University Emeriti Academy, an organization administered through the CWRU Office of the Provost, which is intended to foster closer continuing relationships with emeriti faculty after they retire from full-time employment. 

Wednesday, May 23 | noon–1:30 p.m.

 

Luke Reader, SAGES Lecturer, CWRU

 

On June 23, 2016, Britain voted to leave the European Union. But why? Britain has had a contentious relationship with the EU since it joined 1973, but does this explain why it left? Was Brexit an expression of British populism in a year of populist upheavals?

Were voters deceived by the post-truth environment in which we seem now to be living? In this course, we'll address these questions and more as we examine the consequences of Britain's exit from the EU.

 

Judson Park | Lifelong Learning Members: $25; Nonmembers: $30 (includes lunch) | REGISTER >

Tuesday, May 29 | 5:30 p.m.

 

Kingman Strohl, Chief of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University 

 

It seems paradoxical that with life as precarious as it is, humans spend a third of their lives out of touch with their surroundings. How could such a thing evolve? Even weirder, a few species have evolved the ability to sleep with one half their brain at a time so the other half remains awake to keep an eye out for predators. Contrary to popular belief, sleep is not over-rated. In fact, it's so important to our physiology that prolonged sleep deprivation results in death. The rotation of the earth on its axis influences the physiology of all organisms, has played a vital role in the evolution of sleep and affects our daily lives in ways we may not suspect!

 

Program Schedule:
5:30 p.m. – Coffee and Sign-In
6 p.m. – Lecture
7 p.m. – Dinner with OSS faculty and fellows
7:30 p.m. – Q&A and Dessert

 

CWRU, Tinkham Veale University Center | Lifelong Learning Members: $42; Nonmembers: $48 | REGISTER > 

Presented in collaboration with the Case Western Reserve University Emeriti Academy, an organization administered through the CWRU Office of the Provost, which is intended to foster closer continuing relationships with emeriti faculty after they retire from full-time employment.

June 2018

Sunday, June 3 6 p.m. Reception with Light Hors d'oeuvres; 7 p.m. Lecture

 

Alan Levenson, Schusterman/Josey Chair in Judaic History, The University of Oklahoma

 

What is anti–Semitism and why does it persist? Theodor Herzl believed Jew hatred was a result of the Jews’ economic activities. Benedict Spinoza attributed it to the Jews' self–imposed separation from their non–Jewish neighbors. Others considered anti–Semitism to be the product of suppressed Christian rage over Jesus’ death (carried out by Romans but blamed on Jews). But what about contemporary Iran's obsession with Israel and the Holocaust? Or anti–Semitism in Malaysia, one of several countries with few Jews, but plenty of animosity? Professor Alan Levenson unpacks the conundrum of this Great Hatred.

Join us at 6 p.m. for a reception with light Hors-d'oeuvres, followed by Alan Levenson's lecture at 7 p.m.

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: free; Nonmembers: $10 | Advance registration required | REGISTER >

REGISTER FOR ALL ALAN LEVENSON EVENTS >

Alan Levenson’s visit is made possible by the generous support of Karen and Richard Spector

 

 

Tuesday, June 5 | 1:30-3:30 p.m.

 

Alan Levenson, Schusterman/Josey Chair in Judaic History, The University of Oklahoma

 

The Founding Fathers drew on the language and teachings of the Bible in their public rhetoric. But how religious were they? This lecture looks back at some of the first debates around religion in American public life and examines the ways in which this history continues to be debated in school curriculums today.

(Part of The Bible in Public Life Series) 

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: $10; Nonmembers: $15 | Advance registration required | REGISTER >

REGISTER FOR ALL ALAN LEVENSON EVENTS >

Alan Levenson’s visit is made possible by the generous support of Karen and Richard Spector

 

 

Wednesday, June 6 | 1:30-3:30 p.m.

 

Alan Levenson, Schusterman/Josey Chair in Judaic History, The University of Oklahoma

 

From the Puritans of colonial New England to the Framers of the U.S. Constitution, Americans looked to the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) for guidance as they established their new social structures. When George Washington wrote to the Hebrew Congregation at Newport, Rhode Island, citing the right to sit peacefully “underneath vine and fig tree,” he employed a verse well–known to the country’s Founding Fathers. What was the impact of this religious text on the country’s secular governance structures, and on the founding of civil society?

(Part of The Bible in Public Life Series) 

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: $10; Nonmembers: $15 | Advance registration required | REGISTER >

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Alan Levenson’s visit is made possible by the generous support of Karen and Richard Spector

 

 

Thursday, June 7 | 10-11:30 a.m.

 

Alan Levenson, Schusterman/Josey Chair in Judaic History, The University of Oklahoma

 

Back by popular demand, our Jewish Lives Book Series explores the stories of influential personalities whose Jewish experiences shaped their contributions to culture, science and politics. Professor Alan Levenson kicks off this year’s series with a reflection on the book Jacob, Unexpected Patriarch. A powerful hero of the Bible, Jacob is also one of its most complex and enigmatic figures. Join Levenson for an intriguing perspective and a dynamic view. This taste of our summer series will pique your interest for more!

(Jewish Lives Series Kick-Off

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: free; Nonmembers: $5 | Advance registration required | REGISTER >

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Alan Levenson’s visit is made possible by the generous support of Karen and Richard Spector

 

 

 

 

Thursday, June 7 | 1:30-3:30 p.m.

 

Alan Levenson, Schusterman/Josey Chair in Judaic History, The University of Oklahoma

 

Can government buildings put the Ten Commandments on display? Should they be treated as a symbol of America's legal heritage, or as a constitutionally inappropriate encroachment of religion in the public sphere? This lecture examines two landmark Supreme Court cases (2005), and their current implications.

(Part of The Bible in Public Life Series) 

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: $10; Nonmembers: $15 | Advance registration required | REGISTER >

REGISTER FOR ALL ALAN LEVENSON EVENTS >

Alan Levenson’s visit is made possible by the generous support of Karen and Richard Spector

 

 

 

 

Thursday, June 7 | 7 p.m.

 

Alan Levenson, Schusterman/Josey Chair in Judaic History, The University of Oklahoma

 

Award-winning author Margaret Atwood wrote her chilling dystopian novel The Handmaid's Tale in the 1980s. Today, the book has re-emerged as a new popular television series and has soared again to the bestseller list. This lecture explores the way Atwood draws on the stories of the Bible, revisits them, and imbues them with new messages and meanings.

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: $free; Nonmembers: $10 | Advance registration required | REGISTER >

REGISTER FOR ALL ALAN LEVENSON EVENTS >

Alan Levenson’s visit is made possible by the generous support of Karen and Richard Spector