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Siegal Lifelong Learning

Senior Scholars

Senior Scholars

Senior Scholars is an 11-week program that meets three afternoons per week and features academic lectures by university faculty and local experts on a variety of topics. While the format is lecture style, the afternoons are informal and interactive with an opportunity to ask questions and discuss the topics of the day. The Senior Scholars Council, an elected group of volunteers, helps with the program’s administration and participates in planning the classes.

Senior Scholars is supported by a generous gift from the Jane and Jon Outcalt Foundation.

EUROPEAN UNION: HISTORY, STRUCTURE, FUTURE
KENNETH LEDFORD, Associate Professor of History and Law, Case Western Reserve University

Tuesdays, January 31- April 18 (NO CLASS MARCH 14)
1:30-3:30 p.m.

 

THE WARREN COURT
BARBARA GREENBERG, Magistrate, Bedford Municipal Court; Magistrate, Cuyahoga County Juvenile Court Community Diversion Program

Wednesdays, February 1-March 8
1:30-3:30 p.m.

 

THE GAME’S AFOOT … AGAIN: RE-IMAGININGS OF SHERLOCK HOLMES
JOANNE PODIS, Emerita Professor of English, Ursuline College

Thursdays, February 2- March 2
1:30-3:30 p.m.

 

NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE
JEFF KAREM, Professor of English, Cleveland State University

Thursdays, March 9-April 20 (NO CLASS MARCH 16)
1:30-3:30p.m.

 

RELIGIONS IN/OF OHIO
KRISTEN TOBEY, Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of Theology and Religious Studies, John Carroll University

Wednesdays, March 22-April 19
1:30–3:30p.m.


The College Club of Cleveland | Members: $235 Nonmembers: $260 | REGISTER >

 

Tuesdays, January 31–April 25 | 1:30–3:30 p.m.

No class March 7 and 14


Kenneth Ledford, Associate Professor of History and Law, Case Western Reserve University

 

At the end of World War II, western European political leaders embarked upon a project of European integration as an economic and political project to maintain European independence between the superpowers of the United States and the Soviet Union and a neo-liberal economic project to spur economic growth to maintain the welfare state. From modest beginnings of the European Coal and Steel Community in 1952, the European Union emerged in the twenty-first century as an impressive economic power with its own currency. But limits on the political integration of Europe, resurgent nationalism and populism, challenges from economic crises and refugee crises, and the first effort by a Member State to withdraw from the EU all seem to call the project of European integration into question. This course will explore the origins and evolution of the European Union, its structure and functioning including limits to its powers, and forecast its future in the face of its manifold challenges.


The College Club of Cleveland | Members: $115; Nonmembers: $135 | REGISTER >

 

Week 1:  
EU History Lecture Spring 2017 Week 1 Class notes       
Senior Scholars European Union Spring 2017 Week 1 January 31 Powerpoint
 
Week 2:
EU History Lecture Spring 2017 Week 2 Class notes
Senior Scholars European Union Spring 2017 Week 2 February 7 Powerpoint

Wednesdays, February 1–March 8 | 1:30–3:30 p.m.

 

Barbara Greenberg, Magistrate, Bedford Municipal Court; Magistrate, Cuyahoga County Juvenile Court Community Diversion Program

 

The United States Supreme Court, from 1953 to 1969, was a most unique time in the Court’s history. With the death of Chief Justice Vinton, in 1953, President Eisenhower nominated and with the advice, consent and confirmation from the Senate, California Governor Earl Warren was seated as the new Chief Justice. Believing Governor Warren was a strict conservative in his political leanings, President Eisenhower and our country were in for a surprise. The eighteen men, seated with him over the next sixteen years, will review, interpret, and decide the cases before them in the most far reaching decisions possible. Those outcomes still reverberate today. Our classes will look at the men on this Court, and will focus on the landmark decisions during these many years.

 

The College Club of Cleveland | Members: $115; Nonmembers: $135 | REGISTER >

Wednesdays, March 22–April 19 | 1:30–3:30 p.m.


Kristen Tobey, Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of Theology and Religious Studies, John Carroll University

 

This course investigates the rich religious history and contemporary religious demographics of the region we now call Ohio, which has served as an incubator for several well-known religious groups and significant religious modes. The timeline of the course will stretch from the ancient mound-builders into present day, though much of our material will come from the 19th century. During that century, Ohio was an important site for a number of religious groups including the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (Mormon Church), the Shakers, the Quakers, and the Amish. Also, during the 19th century, several Protestant groups developed and refined their proselytization styles in Ohio, and Cleveland was home to one of the largest Catholic populations in the United States, inspiring (false) rumors that the Pope intended to establish another Vatican in the area. 


The College Club of Cleveland | Members: $115; Nonmembers: $135 | REGISTER >

 

Thursdays, February 2–March 2 | 1:30–3:30 p.m.


Joanne Podis, Emerita Professor of English, Ursuline College

 

This course will explore reasons for the ongoing popularity of Sherlock Holmes, Arthur Conan Doyle’s most famous creation, and will examine film adaptations through the decades, beginning with those in the 1930s featuring Basil Rathbone as Holmes and concluding with the most recent iteration on PBS, with Benedict Cumberbatch as the immortal detective. Discussions will center on how the adaptations faithfully reproduce, or creatively reinterpret, their source materials. The original stories featured in the film adaptations are as follows: The Hound of the Baskervilles; The Red-Headed League; A Scandal in Bohemia; and The Final Problem.


The College Club of Cleveland | Members: $115; Nonmembers: $135 | REGISTER >

 

Thursdays, March 9–April 20 | 1:30–3:30 p.m.

No class March 16


Jeff Karem, Professor of English, Cleveland State University

 

This course provides a sampling of the wide spectrum of Native American literature from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Our study will be geographically diverse, encompassing texts by Native Americans from the Southeast, Midwest, Southwest, and Northwest. The course begins with native texts from the nineteenth century, including folktales and non-fiction, and concludes with recent Native American fiction and poetry. A key goal of this course is considering the diverse and evolving shape of Native American literature, particularly how these texts have addressed Native encounters with the U.S. government, the changing state of nature on the continent, the challenges of the reservation system, and the tensions between tradition and innovation in modern Native American life.


The College Club of Cleveland | Members: $115; Nonmembers: $135 | REGISTER >