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Department of Biomedical Engineering
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2017

Friday, December 15, 2017
NEC Seminar

9:00 AM, Nord 400

Speaker: Kristen Gelenitis
Advisor: Prof. Triolo

Title: Exploiting C-FINE Selectivity to Prolong Moment Output with Neural Stimulation

Abstract:
Implanted nerve cuffs in the lower extremities of individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) have been successful in allowing recipients to achieve standing with electrical stimulation. Current systems use constant, simultaneous stimulation of the knee extensor muscles through multiple contacts on the femoral nerve to achieve the necessary knee moment output. However, constant stimulation can induce rapid fatigue of the targeted muscles which can limit standing durations. In order to offset the effect of fatigue, increase maximal standing times, and improve the consistency of clinical outcomes, more advanced stimulation paradigms that reduce the duty cycle of each muscle by alternating the stimulation delivered through each contact have been investigated. Previous work in our lab has demonstrated the ability of these paradigms to effectively prolong moment output in humans. The study presented in this talk focuses on an analogous animal model that will be used to understand how to better control these stimulation paradigms in clinical applications.

NOTE: This is the final NEC seminar for 2017.

Friday, Decenber 8, 2017
NP Seminar

8:30 AM, Wolstein Research Building Room 1413

Speaker: Parag G. Patil, MD, PhD
Associate Professor
University of Michigan

Title: Vive La Difference: Managing Structural and Functional Diversity in DBS for Movement Disorders  See flyer

Abstract:
Our brains are like faces - we each have one but no two are quite the same. The same holds true for individuals with Parkinson disease and tremor, as well as for candidates for other neuromodulation and neuroprosthetic therapies. Commonalities and generalizations guide therapeutic development and scientific inquiry. At the same time, our success in managing diversity determines the quality of care that we deliver to our patients. At the Universityof Michigan, we have taken a multidisciplinary approach to patient selection and an atlas-independent image-analytical and electrophysiological modeling approsch to outcome evaluation. We believe that this collaborative, neurogengineering approach to DBS will allow us to individually optimize therapy benefits and deepen understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying successful DBS.

Friday, December 1, 2017
NEC Seminar

9:00 AM, NORD 400
Speaker: Hillary Bedell
Advisor: Prof. Capadona
Title: The effects of dual targeting of an innate immune receptor pathway and mechanical mismatch of the tissue-electrode interface on the neuroinflammatory response to intracortical microelectrodes

Abstract: Intracortical microelectrodes afford researchers an effective tool to precisely monitor neural spiking activity for both applications in neuroscience research and the restoration of function through a brain computer interface (BCI). Unfortunately, the neural signals detected by these electrodes decline over time. Previous work from our lab has indicated that a specific innate immune receptor pathway is a viable target to improve intracortical microelectrode recordings. Our lab has also demonstrated that use of a softening material, whose modulus more closely matches that of the brain, for an electrode decreases the inflammatory response at both acute and chronic time points. In the study presented in this talk, we evaluate the combinatorial targeting of both the innate immune receptor pathway and the mechanical mismatch using a different softening electrode made from a thiolene-acrylate shape memory polymer (SMP). Using immunohistochemistry at 2 and 16 week end time points we demonstrate that the SMP microelectrode in fact resulted in a significant increased inflammatory response over a control silicon electrode despite more desirable mechanical properties. Hypotheses to explain this surprising result will be explored.

Friday, November 17, 2017 CANCELED due to a scheduling conflict
NEC Seminar

9:00 AM, NORD 400

Speaker: Platon Lukyanenko
Advisor: Prof. Tyler

Title: Towards an Independent 4-Degree-Of-Freedom Prosthetic Hand Controller

Abstract:
Past results (presented by H Dewald on 11/10/17) indicate that a stable 3 degree-of-freedom prosthetic hand controller can be designed for transradial amputees through a VR based data-collection and then online posture-matching-evaluation task using implanted EMG electrodes through a KNN approach. Such an approach provides a controller comparable to intact-hand performance in the context of time-to-target, and which remains stable for many months.

There is, however, a large difference between a 3 and 4 DoF controller in the context of assumptions which can be made, data which can be collected, and subsequently the requirements imposed on a prospective control method. This talk will examine several hypothetical cases which must be addressed by such a controller, difficulties with present methods, and several prospective approaches for overcoming current controller limitations including context-dependent thresholding and class-specific PCA.

Friday, November 10, 2017
NEC Seminar

9:00 AM, NORD 400

Speaker: Hedrik Dewald
Advisor: Prof. Kirsch

Title: Simultaneous and Independent Control of a Virtual Three-Degree of Freedom Prosthetic Hand using Implanted Intramuscular Electrodes

Abstract:
Eight bi-polar electromyographic electrodes were surgically placed within residual muscles of a transradial amputee. End of range-of-motion posture tasks were used to collect training data for various controllers of simultaneous velocity for three degrees of freedom of a virtual reality hand - hand aperture, wrist flexion/extension, and wrist rotation. Machine learning approaches were used to convert magnitude and frequency-related features of the EMG signals into continuous joint velocities. A virtual reality posture matching task was used to test online system performance, with performance of the subject's intact hand measured by electrogoniometer and used as a position controller considered the standard for comparison. Results show comparable performance in time-to-target between machine learning algorithms and the intact hand, but reduced path efficiency. Long-term controller performance was also found to be stable, with no need for retraining.

Friday, November 3, 2017
NP Seminar

8:30 AM, BRB 105

Speaker: Sherif M Elbasiouny, PhD, PE, PEng
Assistant Professor
Wright State University

Title: Neuroengineering Approaches in Neuroprosthetics and Neurodegeneration  Download flyer

Abstract:
This talk will present how neuroengineering approaches are making advances in the fields of neuroprosthetics and neurodegeneration. In neuroprosthetics, state-of-the art prostheses use the EMG signal to decode the amputee's motor intent; however, the EMG signal does not provide accurate information on the finer characteristics of the desired movement, making them inadequate to control the sophisticated movements of modern prostheses. This talk will present our effort in developing a new technology based on the motor neuron (motoneuron) firing signals. Using computational approaches, we have constructed a multi-scale, highly realistic computational model of the spinal sensorimotor circuit under different neuromodulatory states. This model was used as a research platform to develop novel, robust motor decoder algorithms based on the motoneuron firing behavior for closed-loop control of prosthetic movement.

In neurodegeneration, this talk will present a novel cross-disciplinary neuroengineering approach that we developed to examine the cellular abnormalities underlying motoneuron degeneration in the fatal neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In addition to understanding how the motoneuron regulates its excitability under disease conditions, this approach has uncovered cellular abnormalities masked from experimental investigation and identified novel drug targets, leading to a novel ALS treatment.

Friday, October 27, 2017
NEC Seminar

9:00 AM, NORD 400

Speaker: Elizabeth Heald
Advisor: Prof. Peckham

Title: Myoelectric Signals as Neuroprosthetic Control Sources: A Potential Application for Below-Injury EMG activity in SCI

Abstract:
Motor neuroprostheses expand the functional abilities of individuals with chronic SCI to a level that cannot currently be achieved with any other intervention. Current clinical implementations of these systems utilize myoelectric activity from non-paralyzed muscles as command signals to control the functional output of the device. As neuroprosthetic technology improves, there is an increased need for command signals to control the additional functionality that can be provided to users. Our previous work has demonstrated the presence of volitional EMG activity in the lower extremity in a majority of subjects with chronic, motor complete cervical SCI. This activity may be suitable to serve as a command signal in a neuroprosthetic system. In this presentation, I will review how recorded EMG signals are translated into functional movements in clinical upper extremity neuroprostheses. I will then present our plans to implement biofeedback training paradigms with the goal of improving myoelectric signal quality from below-injury muscles, and our interface for evaluating the suitability of these signals for neuroprosthetic control.

Friday, October 20, 2017
NP Seminar

8:30 AM, BRB 105

Speaker: James Patton, PhD
Professor, Bioengineering
University of Illinois Chicago

Title: Models of Motor Control and Learning in Therapeutic Rehabilitation

Abstract:
It has been shown to be powerful to leverage what we know (i.e., existing models) about neural adaptation in neurorehabilitation. These models stem from how people learn through mistakes, and several techniques on using such models might dictate better training conditions helped by robotic technology. However, the clinical trials model has not proven to be effective test because of few samples and restrictive inclusion criteria. This talk will show how such "small data" problems lend themselves well to scrutiny and interrogation from modern predictive modeling and validation techniques, suggesting a more "organic" model for gathering data.

Friday, October 6, 2017
NEC Seminar

9:00 AM, Nord 400

Speakers: Breanne Christie "Latency Of The Perceived Sensation Evoked By Peripheral Nerve Stimulation In People With Lower Limb Amputations" and Dan Young "Restoring Thought-Controlled Movements After Paralysis: Artifact Reduction Techniques for iBCI Control of FES Actuated Movements"

Friday, September 29, 2017
NEC Seminar

9:00 AM, Nord 400

Speaker: Jesssica de Abreau
Advisor: Prof. Robert Kirsch
Title: Characterization of object interaction effects for improving the functional performance of FES-iBCI systems

Abstract:
Spinal cord injuries (SCI) affect more than 276,000 patients in the United States, severely impairing activities of daily living. Lesions in the upper spinal cord may lead to tetraplegia, causing paralysis of the four limbs. Previous surveys of patients with tetraplegia report that regaining arm and hand function is ranked as the highest priority for improving quality of life. In BrainGate, we combine functional electrical stimulation (FES) with intracortical brain computer interfaces (iBCI) to bridge spinal cord injuries and restore motor function to patients with paralyzed upper limbs. Our system relies on two intracortical electrode arrays implanted in the primary motor cortex, used to decode motor intent. A percutaneous FES system is used to provide arm and hand muscle stimulation, reproducing the intended movement. Recently, our study has provided the first proof-of-concept of a combined FES-iBCI neuroprosthesis in restoring upper limb function to patients with tetraplegia. Our system allowed our participant to move his own arm to execute functional tasks such as feeding and drinking.

In this talk, we will discuss the effects of object interaction and how they might affect the performance of FES-iBCI systems. Object interaction effects have been briefly mentioned in literature in the context of iBCIs. The effect of object interaction has been described as a repulsive force field surrounding an object with which the participant intends to interact, particularly in tasks in the physical world and with many of degrees of freedom. Here, we discuss experiments to investigate and characterize the effects of object interaction in FES-BCI neuroprostheses. This investigation will allow further insight into strategies for neural control of kinematics during functional tasks.

Friday, September 22, 2017
NEC Seminar

9:00 AM, Nord 400

Speaker: Sydney Song
Advisor: Prof. Capadona
Title: A Combined Approach to Reducing Neuroinflammation in Response to Intracortical Microelectrodes

Abstract
To ensure long-term consistent neural recordings, next-generation intracortical microelectrodes are being developed with an increased emphasis on reducing the neuroinflammatory response. This increased emphasis stems from the improved understanding of the multifaceted role that inflammation may play in disrupting both biologic and non-biologic components of the overall neural interface circuit. To combat neuroinflammation and improve recording quality, the field is actively progressing from traditional inorganic materials towards approaches that either minimizes the microelectrode footprint or that incorporate compliant materials, bioactive molecules, conducting polymers or nanomaterials. However, the immune-privileged cortical tissue introduces an added complexity compared to other biomedical applications that remains to be fully understood. The Capadona Lab utilizes basic science techniques to provide a more complete mechanistic understanding of the molecular and biological-mediated failure modes for intracortical microelectrodes. The current study investigates a combination of mechanism associated with neuroinflammatory-mediated microelectrode failure.

Specifically, one mechanism for microelectrode failure we investigate is neuroinflammation and subsequent neurodegeneration. We approach this mechanism by impeding the signaling pathway leading to activation of immune cells. Another mechanism for failure we investigate is the micro-motion of the stiff device in soft brain. We approach this mechanism by using a compliant material to reduce injury. Previous studies have shown promise in both of these approaches. We hypothesize that two approaches to reducing tissue damage, one from biological, and one from material science, when combined, will further reduce the brain injury due to intracortical recording devices.

Friday, September 15, 2017
NP Seminar

8:30 AM, Nord 400

Speaker: Robert Turner, PhD
Professor, Dept. of Neurobiology and Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition, University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine
Title: How Does DBS Work? Insights From Neurophysiology

Abstract
Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a surgical therapy proven to be highly effective for a variety of neurologic disorders including essential tremor, Parkinson's disease, and dystonia. It is surprising then that considerable mystery remains about the mechanism of action of DBS (i.e., understanding how DBS "works" to ameliorate symptoms). This seminar will review recent studies of the effects of DBS on neuronal activity, including some performed in the lab, with the goal of showing how DBS may work by attenuating the transmission of abnormal "pathologic" neuronal activity across the affected brain circuits.

Friday, September 8, 2017
9:00 AM, Nord 400

Speaker: Ryan Reyes
Advisor: Prof. Ronald Triolo
Title: Development of a "Muscle First" Motor-Assisted Hybrid Exoskeleton for Walking After Paraplegia

Abstract: Traditional commercial exoskeletons enable persons paralyzed by spinal cord injury (SCI) to regain some ambulatory function. However, the majority of commercially available exoskeletons are fully motorized, and thus perform all the movement required for ambulation. Thus, their users do not experience all the physiological health benefits of exercising the large lower extremity muscles. We are developing a "Muscle First" Motor-Assisted Hybrid Exoskeleton, which uses implanted neural stimulation to activate the leg muscles in order to generate the majority of the forces required for ambulation. The exoskeleton provides the bracing necessary for stability and to shape limb trajectories, while providing rest periods for the stimulated muscles. The Motor-Assisted Hybrid Exoskeleton provides just enough additional joint moment to produce repeatable stepping motions as muscles fatigue. This enables a smaller, lighter exoskeleton, coordinated ambulation, as well as the physiological benefits discussed above. The research presented here details the current technology development and the initial forays into determining the best methods for coordinated muscular and motorized control.

Friday, September 1, 2017
9:00 AM, Nord 400

Speaker: Christopher Delianides
Advisor: Prof. Ronald Triolo
Title: Electrical Stimulation of the Upper Sciatic for Strong Hip Extension and Balanced Ankle Moments in SCI Patients

Abstract: In the United States alone, there are nearly 300,000 people living with spinal cord injury (SCI), with around 17,000 new cases every year. Electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves can be an effective method of generating contractions of the otherwise paralyzed muscles, leading to increased independence and improvement in markers of overall health. Previous work on the femoral and distal sciatic nerves using composite flat interface nerve electrodes (C-FINEs) has demonstrated a high degree of selectivity for activation of quadriceps and ankle musculature, as well as the superiority of these cuff electrodes over more commonly used intramuscular electrodes with respect to long-term stability and surgical complexity. Activation of knee extensors and ankle dorsiflexors and plantar flexors in this manner provided recipients with new options for achieving standing and stepping motions. Continuation of this work seeks to increase the capabilities of these patients with the addition of strong hip extension generated by the hamstrings, requiring cuff placement more proximal on the sciatic nerve than has been previously attempted. Proximal placement along the nerve also provides the challenge of selective activation of ankle musculature for balancing plantar/dorsiflexion and ankle inversion/eversion. The research presented here details the exploratory phase of this proposal, including histology and cadaver work, intraoperative testing, and fascicular modeling of responses to electrical impulse, as well as development of a novel transducer for intraoperative ankle moment measurement.

Friday, August 25, 2017
NEC Seminar
9:00 AM, Nord 400

Speaker: Kiley Armstrong
Advisor: Prof. Ronald Triolo
Title: Automatic Detection of Destabilizing Wheelchair Conditions.

Abstract: Nearly 42% of injurious events after SCI are caused by wheelchair tips and falls. Constant neural stimulation of the otherwise paralyzed core, hip, and trunk muscles can stabilize seated posture, as well as return users to erect sitting positions in response to applied disturbances. The goal of this study is to automatically detect potentially destabilizing conditions encountered by manual wheelchair users and activate the appropriate muscles to prevent falls and stabilize the seated operator. Wireless inertial measurement units containing tri-axial acceleration and gyroscopic sensors were mounted on the wheelchair frame with 4 individuals with low cervical and thoracic level injuries. An algorithm utilizing the accelerometer and gyroscopic data was constructed to detect and classify the turn and collision events, and trigger appropriate stimulus patterns. The research in this presentation investigated the detection accuracy of the algorithm, as well as the feasibility for modulated stimulation to hip and trunk extensor muscles to restore erect sitting posture after a destabilizing event.

Wednesday, August 23, 2017
NP Seminar - 3:00PM Wolstein Research Bldg Room 1413
Speaker: Marmar Vaseghi, MD, PhD
Title: Parasympathetic dysfunction in cardiac disease and the role of vagal nerve stimulation in treatment of ventricular arrhythmias. PDF

Abstract: Myocardial infarction causes sympathetic activation and parasympathetic dysfunction, which act in concert to increase the risk of sudden death due to ventricular arrhythmias. Although blockade of the sympathetic nervous system has been invaluable in the treatment of patients with heart failure and ventricular arrhythmias, little is know about the mechanisms underlying parasympathetic dysfunction.
New data is delineating consequences of myocardial infarction on parasympathetic myocardial neurotransmitter levels and on the function of parasympathetic cardiac and extra-cardiac ganglia, pointing to a decrease central parasympathetic drive as the reason behind the parasympathetic abnormalities observed in heart failure. Increasing parasympathetic drive with vagal nerve stimulation and elucidating its electrophysiological effects in the ventricle in the setting of chronic myocardial infarction could present an important avenue for treatment of patients heart failure and ventricular arrhythmias. However, the degree and frequency of vagal nerve stimulation has yet to be elucidated, particularly given the controversial results of this therapy in clinical trials of heart failure patients. Any effects of vagal nerve stimulation, however, on treatment of ventricular tachycardia after myocardial infarction could serve as important option for patients with cardiomyopathy, who present with VT storm and recurrent defibrillator shocks, despite standard medical therapy and ablation procedures.

Friday, August 11, 2017
NEC Seminar
9:00 AM, Nord 400

The NEC seminar will consist of four short presentations by undergraduates who are completing their summer internships.

Keith Dona (PI: Capadona)
Keying Chen (PI: Evon Ereifej)
Josh Rosenberg (PI: Matt Schiefer)
Miranda Anderson-Kenney (PI: Dustin Tyler)

Friday, August 4, 2017
NEC Seminar
9:00 AM, Nord 400

Speaker: Chia-Chu Chiang, Ph.D.
Title: Identifying two traveling waves in the epileptic brain by voltage imaging

Abstract: Fast and slow neural waves have been observed to propagate in the human brain during seizures. Yet the nature of these waves is difficult to study in a surgical setting. Here we report an observation of two different traveling waves propagating in the in-vitro epileptic hippocampus at speeds similar to those in the human brain. A fast and a slow traveling wave were recorded simultaneously with a genetically encoded voltage sensitive fluorescent protein (VSFP Butterfly 1.2) and a high speed camera. The results of this study indicate that the fast wave is NMDA-sensitive but the slow wave is not. Image analysis and model simulation demonstrate that the slow wave is moving slowly, generating the fast wave and is therefore a moving source of the epileptiform activity. This slow moving source is associated with a propagating neural calcium wave detected with calcium dye (OGB-1) but is independent of NMDA receptors, not related to ATP release, and much faster than those previously recorded potassium waves. Our model simulation suggests that the slow traveling neural source can propagate by the ephaptic effect like epileptiform activity. These findings provide an alternative explanation for slow propagation seizure wavefronts associated with fast propagating interictal spikes.

Friday, July 28, 2017
NEC Seminar
9:00 AM, Nord 400

Speaker: Joseph Marmerstein
Advisor: Prof. Durand
Title: Chronic Recording of Rat Vagal Nerve Activity with Carbon Nanotube Yarn Electrodes

Abstract: The study of small peripheral nerves such as those in the autonomic nervous system holds great promise for the detection and treatment of a variety of pathologies. In particular, the vagus nerve, which is a highway of autonomic activity, has been receiving increased attention due to it's interaction with nearly every internal organ in the body. Dr. Durand's group has developed a novel way for interfacing with these nerves, via carbon nanotube (CNT) yarn microelectrodes. CNT yarn electrodes were implanted in the left cervical vagus nerve of rats over a 3+month period, and vagal activity was recorded chronically during a variety of physiological challenges applied to the anesthetized rat. Recently, a new recording set-up has allowed for extended recordings of vagal activity in awake, behaving animals, which will allow for new experiments and studies to be performed.

Friday, July 21, 2017
NEC Seminar
9:00 AM, Nord 400

Speaker: Kelsey Bower
Advisor: Prof. McIntyre
Title: Modeling Deep Brain Stimulation of Branched Axon Terminals

Abstract: Optogenetic studies of neural pathways have been instrumental in dissecting the neural circuitry involved in DBS for Parkinson's Disease (PD). Recent optogenetic studies of the hyperdirect pathway have suggested that stimulation of this pathway may be sufficient for improving the motor symptoms of PD. Computational models consisting of relevant anatomy and the DBS electrode can be a useful tool for optimizing DBS for specific pathways.

State-of-the-art DBS models utilize multi-compartment double-cable models to predict the neural response to extracellular stimulation. These models have been shown to effectively reproduce results from in vivo electrophysiological studies and are generally accepted as the gold-standard for predicting neural activation. The accuracy of these predictions, however, is dependent on the structural accuracy of the axon model, as small changes in the axon structure can result in large changes in the predicted neural response. This is especially relevant in STN DBS; axons projecting to the subthalamic region exhibit a branched terminating structure, yet most neural models neglect to consider this termination. The goal of this project is to evaluate how the axon terminal affects action potential generation in response to extracellular stimulation, and identify the errors in neural activation prediction associated with ignoring this structural characteristic.

Friday, July 14, 2017
NEC Seminar
9:00 AM, Nord 400

Speaker: Griffin Rial
Advisor: Dr. Jeffrey Capadona
Title: I-Corps@Ohio: Assessing the Commercial Viability of University Technologies with Panel Discussion to Follow

Abstract: Research in the Capadona lab focuses on understanding and mitigating deleterious aspects of the neuroinflammatory response to implanted devices in the brain. Recently, we have developed and tested an anti-inflammatory coating and its efficacy on intracortical microelectrodes with the goal of translating the technology to patients.

Over the past 10 weeks, we participated in the I-Corps@Ohio program. This program is modeled after an NSF program, and funded through the Ohio Department of Education. The goal of this program is to assess the commercial viability of a technology developed in an academic research setting. Using a lean startup process, we conducted 100 customer discovery interviews to test if a commercial market exists for our technology. In the process, we became aware of additional clinical needs for our technology, and modified our commercialization pathway. In this seminar, Griffin will present an overview of the I-Corps@Ohio program, and tell you about our team's lessons learned and final conclusions.

Following an overview of the I-Corps program, Griffin will moderate a panel composed of other Case students who participated in the I-Corps program this summer. The panel will include Zhehao Zhang (Gratzl Lab), Jacob Antunes (Viswanath Lab), and Youjoung Kim (Portillo Lab). They will discuss their I-Corps experience, and answer any questions the audience may have.

Monday, July 10, 2017
10:30 AM, Wolstein Research Building
Room 6136

Speaker: Sohail (Muhammad) Moor, University of Calgary
Title: Studying cortical effects of deep brain stimulation using optical imaging.

Friday, July 7, 2017
NEC Seminar
9:00 AM, Nord 400
Speaker: Brian Sanner
Title: High density in-line connector for serviceable high-channel count implantable systems

Functional electrical stimulation (FES) and electrode recording systems are being used for an increasingly broad array of clinical treatments. As these systems become more complex they approach the physical limitation of implantable real-estate within the body to contain the many electrically isolated leads. Furthermore, with the continual advancement of technology it is likely that there will be many evolutions of technology during a patient's lifetime. Further, if there is a component failure, replacement of an entire system could induce unnecessary surgical risk, as well as require the removal and replacement of successful components. This might not be possible or might result in less performance in the replacement system. A high density 34-channel pad and pin in-line connector that is of comparable size to the 8-channel in-line Medtronic connector currently approved for clinical use was developed by our collaborator, Dr. Shire at Cornell University. It has undergone saline soak testing, and just completed its first in vivo test in the feline model where it was implanted for over six months. The next step is in vivo animal model testing of the connector in-line with a peripheral nerve cuff electrode to evaluate its performance in use for FES.

Friday, June 16, 2017
NEC Seminar
9:00 AM, Nord 400

Speaker: Dennis Bourbeau, PhD
Title: Electrical stimulation to improve bowel function

Background: Neurogenic bowel dysfunction is a common concern for persons with spinal cord injury(SCI), which may result in slowed colonic motility, chronic constipation, and fecal incontinence. It adversely affects quality of life and typically requires rigorous bowel care routines, which often involves significant time expenditure for the individual and/or caregivers. We aim to develop an alternative approach using functional electrical stimulation to restore bowel function for persons with neurogenic bowel dysfunction. The objectives of this study were to determine if reflex colonic activity can be elicited by electrical stimulation of the colon and to identify the effect of stimulation variables, such as stimulation pattern and electrode location.

Methods: Acute experiments were conducted in nine neurally intact cats under chloralose anesthesia. Proximal colon, distal colon, and rectum were electrically stimulated with continuous and burst patterns. Proximal colon, distal colon, and rectal pressures were recorded via balloon catheters. Pressure amplitude was the primary outcome measure, and rate of pressure change and onset delay were secondary measures.

Results: Electrical stimulation of the colon evoked localized colon contractions in the colon segment directly below the electrodes in all cats. Constant frequency stimulation produced ischemia and a tetanic colon contraction, but burst pattern stimulation at similar amplitudes did not alter tissue appearance, and colonic pressures increased more slowly. Colon pressures increased with increasing stimulus amplitude, frequency, pulse width, and burst number. Rectal stimulation did not evoke significant colon responses without affecting limb responses simultaneously. Proximal colon stimulation resulted in only proximal colon pressure increases. Distal colon stimulation generated both distal and proximal colon pressure increases. Isoflurane anesthesia eliminated proximal pressure responses and reduced distal pressure responses, suggesting that reflex pathways were activated via distal colon stimulation.

Conclusion: Colonic pressures can be produced via both direct and reflex pathways using electrical colon stimulation. A neural stimulation approach has the potential to improve colonic motility. Further preclinical work is needed, including study of SCI animal models, prior to translation to human clinical research.

Friday, June 9, 2017
NEC Seminar
9:00 AM, Nord 400

Speaker: Anisha Rastogi
Mentor: Dr. Ajiboye
Title: Evaluation of intracortical neural activity during attempted force production across multiple hand grasp configurations

Background: Intracortical brain computer interfaces (iBCIs) have the potential to restore hand grasping in individuals with tetraplegia. While most human-operated iBCIs have utilized only kinematic information from motor cortex, natural grasping and object interaction also requires the use of force-related information. We have previously demonstrated that neural modulation to attempted hand grasping forces is preserved in one individual with tetraplegia. However, this study only evaluated neural modulation during attempted power grasping. Previous literature has shown that the motor cortex encodes activity that are tuned over a variety of movement parameters, which include both grasping force and hand grasp configuration. Here, we evaluate the extent to which hand grasp configuration affects force-related neural activity, as well as the ability to discriminate between different levels of force. Methods: Participants of the BrainGate2 Clinical Trial were asked to attempt to produce four discrete force levels (light, medium, hard, no force) with the dominant upper limb, using a power grasp and one of three pincer grasps. During the task, we obtained full broadband neural recordings from two, 96-channel microelectrode arrays (Blackrock Microsystems, Salt Lake City, UT) in the dominant motor cortex. From each channel, we extracted and characterized single unit activity and two time-varying neural features (spike firing rates and high frequency spike power). Features were used as inputs to a linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier to offline-discriminate force levels produced during each hand grasping configuration. Results and Conclusions: We found that most neural features exhibit force modulation that is dependent upon hand grasp configuration. On a population level, classification performance (our ability to predict the users' attempted force level from neural activity) exceeded chance levels for all hand grasping configurations. However, we found that individual force levels were best discriminated during attempted power grasping. These results could affect how we decode forces in a closed-loop iBCI system.

Friday, June 2. 2017
NEC Seminar
9:00 AM, Nord 400

Speaker: Ivana Cuberovic
Mentor: Prof. Dustin Tyler
Title: Experience with high density composite flat interface nerve electrodes on a sensory restoration application.

Abstract: While prostheses have undergone many mechanical advancements in recent years, they still do not provide natural and intuitive feedback to users. To restore sensation, four subjects have been implanted with nerve cuff electrodes over the past five years. In two subjects, the implanted components included eight-channel Flat Interface Nerve Electrodes (FINEs), four-channel spiral cuff electrodes, and spring and pin connectors. The other two subjects have systems consisting of fifteen-channel High Density Composite Flat Interface Nerve Electrodes (HD C-FINEs) and eight-in-line connectors. An initial comparison of the systems with respect to sensory stability is presented here.
Both systems evoke focal tactile sensations across the phantom hand. Many of the evoked sensations are in functionally useful locations, including the fingertips, ulnar border, and palm. As expected, the fifteen channel system provides fuller coverage of the hand. Unexpectedly, the C-FINE systems exhibit increased variance in reported locations for a given contact, both as a function of time and as a function of elbow angle.

Friday, May 26. 2017
NEC Seminar
9:00 AM, Nord 400

Speaker: Emily Graczyk
Mentor: Prof. Dustin Tyler
Title: Impact of sensory feedback on user experience, prosthesis use, and activity performance: Results from the first home study of a sensory enabled prosthesis

Abstract: While neural prostheses to restore sensory feedback to upper limb amputees have the potential to improve task performance and quality of life, studies of sensory restoration systems (SRSs) have only been conducted in controlled laboratory environments. In this study, for the first time, two subjects used a SRS autonomously in a home setting. Because the experience of using an SRS for an extended period of time and in new settings is likely to have multifaceted impacts on the participants, a battery of functional tests, surveys, and user experience interviews were conducted. The SRS consisted of an Ottobock VariPlus Speed prosthetic hand customized with an embedded aperture sensor and fingertip pressure sensors on the thumb, index, and middle fingers, an external nerve stimulator with a custom sensory stimulation program, and cabling to connect the stimulator to percutaneous leads connected to FINEs around the participants' median nerves. The stimulator mapped pressure signals from the finger sensors into stimulation pulse trains and delivered the stimulation to individual electrode contacts in the FINE. The two trials of the take home SRS were successfully completed and demonstrate initial feasibility. Subjects were able to independently don and doff the SRS, change stimulation settings, and calibrate the prosthetic sensors. Stimulation parameters and sensation locations remained stable throughout the duration of the study. The subjects wore the SRS longer and reported using their prosthesis to do more activities when sensation was enabled. Interviews and usage logs indicated that subjects preferred using the prosthesis with sensory feedback. Robustness, reliability, and ease of use are critical design features for an SRS.

Friday, May 19, 2017
Seminar
11 AM Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute, room NE1-205

Speaker: Dr. Luis Alvarez
Title: Neural Culture Screening Platform to Accelerate Regenerative Electrode Design

Dr. Luis Alvarez will be presenting "Neural Culture Screening Platform to Accelerate Regenerative Electrode Design" in the APT Center Distinguished Lecture Series. Dr. Alvarez is the founding Principal Investigator of the Regenerative Biology Research Group (www.regenbiogroup.org) at the National Cancer Institute where he leads a team of investigators to develop translational regenerative medical approaches to address loss of function resulting from combat trauma and cancer. Dr. Alvarez will discuss his group's development of a neural culture platform that can be used to screen biologically-active surface coatings and mechanical properties and applications of the platform in material selection for neural electrodes, in drug screening, or as selective neural guide where precise spatial control over axon placement is required either pre- or post-extension.

Map & Directions | Dr. Alvarez biography and Abstract

Friday, May 19, 2017
NEC Seminar
9:00 AM, Nord 400

Speaker: Nick Couturier
Mentor: Prof. Dominique Durand
Title: Low-frequency fiber tract stimulation for seizure suppression in cortical epilepsies

Abstract: Frontal Lobe Epilepsy (FLE) is the second most common form of focal epileptic disorders. FLE is characterized by highly diverse seizure symptoms often delaying accurate diagnosis. Unlike the more common temporal lobe epilepsy, FLE tends to be more refractory to anti-epileptic drug treatment accounting for up to half of all intractable epilepsies. Furthermore, the success rate of surgical resections for neocortical seizures is only 50-60% compared to 75% for temporal lobectomy. A novel treatment for refractory epilepsy of neocortical origin is investigated based on the success of previous studies in deep brain stimulation for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. We previously reported seizure suppression of 90% in animal models as well as in patients. Seizure suppression is achieved through direct stimulation of the fiber tracts connecting structures in both hemispheres of the brain. We stimulate at low frequencies between 1-10 Hz to elicit a long-lasting hyperpolarization in the post-synaptic neurons. For epileptic foci in the frontal cortex, we stimulate the corpus callosum acutely for 30 minutes to suppress seizures both during stimulation as well as after stimulation. Initial experiments demonstrate significant seizure suppression in an acute cortical model of epilepsy. Additional acute experiments, as well as chronic experiments, are being planned to validate the effectiveness of fiber tract stimulation for seizure suppression.

Friday, May 12, 2017
NP Seminar - Industry Round Table & Reception
8:30 AM, Wolstein Research Building, Room 1413

Speakers: Maria Bennett, MS, President and CEO, SPR Therapeutics. Steve Fening, PhD, Director, Case-Coulter Translational Research Partnership

Download flyer [pdf]

Friday, April 28, 2017
NEC Seminar
9:00 AM, Nord 400
Speaker: Brian Sanner
Advisor: Dr. Dustin Tyler
Title: TBA

Friday, April 21, 2017
NEC Seminar

9:00 AM, Nord 400
Speaker: Breanne Christie
PI
: Dr. Dustin Tyler and Dr. Ron Triolo

Title: "Long-Term Stability of Stimulating Spiral Nerve Cuff Electrodes on Human Peripheral Nerves"

Abstract: Electrical stimulation of the peripheral nerves has been shown to be effective in restoring sensory and motor functions in the lower and upper extremities. This neural stimulation can be applied via non-penetrating spiral nerve cuff electrodes, though minimal information has been published regarding their long-term performance for multiple years after implantation. Since 2005, fourteen human volunteers with cervical or thoracic spinal cord injuries, or upper limb amputation, were chronically implanted with a total of 50 spiral nerve cuff electrodes on nine different nerves (mean time post-implant 6.7+3.1 years). The spiral nerve cuffs examined remain functional in motor and sensory neuroprostheses for 5-11 years after implantation. They exhibit stable charge thresholds, clinically relevant recruitment properties, and good muscle selectivity. Non-penetrating spiral nerve cuff electrodes appear to be a suitable option for long-term clinical use on human peripheral nerves in implanted neuroprostheses.

Friday, March 31, 2017
NEC Seminar
9:00 AM, Nord 400

Speaker: Max Freeberg
Mentor: Prof. Triolo
Title: TBA
Abstract: TBA

Friday, March 24, 2017
NEC Seminar
9:00 AM, Nord 400

Speaker: David Cunningham, Ph.D.
Human Performance and Engineering Laboratory
Kessler Foundation Research Center
Title: Tailoring brain stimulation to the nature of rehabilitative therapies and their unique mechanisms of neuroplasticity

Abstract:
Over the past decade there has been growing interest in combining non-invasive brain stimulation with rehabilitation in order to accelerate rehabilitative outcomes in patients with chronic stroke. The primary application of non-invasive brain stimulation has involved augmenting mechanisms of neuroplasticity which are unique to intensively training the paretic limb and restraining or otherwise discouraging movement of the non-paretic limb. However, several groups have discussed the importance of bilateral therapies, involving the paretic and non-paretic limb simultaneously, as they may provide a more feasible alternative, especially for patients with a greater disability. Still, because there is limited understanding of what neurophysiologic mechanisms underlie bilateral therapies there has been a lack of discussion on how to pair non-invasive brain stimulation in order to complement bilateral task practice. Further, the pairing of non-invasive brain stimulation with therapy has also failed to consider mechanisms of neuromuscular fatigue which occurs over the duration of a therapeutic session. This talk presents two experiments which investigates the mechanisms of bilateral therapy and neuromuscular fatigue and discusses tailoring non-invasive brain stimulation based on their unique mechanisms of neuroplasticity.

Friday, March 17, 2017
Note Time and Location Changes
12:00PM, Wickenden 321

Speaker: Frank Willett
Mentor: A. Bolu Ajiboye, Ph.D.

Title: (Dissertation Defense) "Intracortical Brain-Computer Interfaces: Modeling the Feedback Control Loop, Improving Decoder Performance, and Restoring Upper Limb Function with Muscle Stimulation"

Abstract:
Intracortical brain-computer interfaces (iBCIs) can help to restore movement and communication to people with chronic tetraplegia by recording neural activity from the motor cortex and translating it into the motion of an external device (typically a computer cursor or robotic arm). In this work, we focus on three avenues for advancement: (1) better understanding the feedback control loop created by the interaction between the user and the iBCI, (2) leveraging that understanding to improve the performance of decoding algorithms that translate neural activity into movement, and (3) restoring control over a person's own arm and hand by using a combined iBCI and muscle stimulation system.

In Chapters 2-3, we develop a deeper understanding of how linear decoders operate in closed-loop. Using data from the BrainGate2 pilot clinical trial, we develop a feedback control model that describes how users modulate their neural activity to move towards their target, stop accurately, and correct for movement errors. We use the model to characterize the errors made by linear decoders and find that they are signal-independent (i.e. they do not scale with the size of the user's motor command). As a consequence, we show that linear decoders only work well within a narrow range of movement scales and perform poorly when both precise and gross movements are required, in contrast to able-bodied movements that achieve success over a wide range of scales.

In Chapters 4-6, we explore three avenues for improving decoder performance based on the above results. First, we improve the linear decoder's ability to enable movements of different scales by adding a separate decoding pathway that can extract non-linear movement scale information from the neural activity. We show that this new pathway improves the user's ability to stop precisely on the target without sacrificing movement speed. Second, we show that our feedback control model can be used to optimize decoder performance by predicting, via simulation, which parameters will lead to the best closed-loop performance. Third, we test whether the feedback control model can improve decoder calibration by more accurately estimating the user's intended movements. Contrary to expectation, we found that all intention estimation methods we tested performed equivalently, despite differing significantly in their ability to accurately describe user intent.

In Chapters 7-8, we make progress towards a combined iBCI and functional electrical stimulation (FES) system that can restore motion to a person's own arm and hand. In a non-human primate model, we develop and test a new decoding method that enables direct cortical control over muscle stimulation and that can be calibrated automatically (without the need for expert design of muscle stimulation patterns). Finally, we demonstrate, for the first time, a person in the BrainGate2 pilot clinical trial using a combined FES + iBCI system to make continuously controlled, multi-joint reaching and grasping movements to match target postures and to complete functional tasks (eating mashed potatoes and drinking from a cup of coffee).

Friday, March 10, 2017
8:30 AM, Wolstein Research Building, Room 1413
NP Seminar

Speaker: Benjamin D. Greenberg, MD PhD
Center for Neurorestoration and Neurotechnology
Providence VA Medical Center
Title: Brain Circuit-Based Treatments for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A model for Neuropsychiatry

Friday, February 24, 2017
Nord 400, 9:00 AM
NEC Seminar

Speaker: Cale Crowder
Advisor: Dr. Robert Kirsch
Title: System Identification of the Human Motor Cortex

Abstract: Cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) can result in paralysis of all four limbs - a condition known as tetraplegia. Recently, our research group demonstrated an intramuscular functional electrical stimulation (FES) system controlled by an intracortical brain computer interface (BCI) implanted in the human motor cortex. The combined FES-BCI system was able to restore limited movement to a study participant's paralyzed arm. While the participant was able to perform simple tasks, such as self-feeding, self-drinking, and self-bathing, the FES-BCI system was inconsistent in its behavior. The purpose of the present study is to simplify the FES-BCI system controller in order to achieve better performance. Our objective is to extract additional information from the motor cortex in order to decrease the mental energy exerted by our participant in controlling the FES-BCI system. To extract additional information from the motor cortex, we are utilizing so-called "system identification," which uses established methods to build a model of a physiological system. During this seminar, we will describe the challenges of using a FES-BCI system, provide an introduction to system identification, and demonstrate, via modeling, how system identification can be used to extract information from the human motor cortex.

Friday, February 24, 2017
Seminar
11am, Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute, in room NE1-205

Dr. Peter Adamczyk will be presenting "Semi-Active Foot Prostheses for Low-Power Gait Restoration" in the APT Center Distinguished Lecture Series. Dr. Adamczyk directs the UW Biomechatronics, Assistive Devices, Gait Engineering and Rehabilitation Laboratory (UW BADGER Lab), at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, which aims to enhance physical and functional recovery from orthopedic and neurological injury through advanced robotic devices. Dr. Adamczyk will discuss his group's work on the mechanisms by which these injuries impair normal motion and coordination, and target interventions to encourage recovery and/or provide biomechanical assistance.

Dr. Adamczyk's presentation information is attached, as well as a map and parking directions.

Lab Website: http://uwbadgerlab.engr.wisc.edu/

Call for individual meetings

If you would like to meet with Dr. Adamczyk, please email Andrew Shoffstall (andrew.shoffstall@case.edu) by Friday, February 17th, with your availability for the following times and locations:

Cleveland Clinic: Friday, February 24th, from 8am - 11am
Case Western Reserve University: Friday, February 24th, from 2pm - 5pm

Map and Parking directions | Adamczyk Talk Info

Friday, February 17, 2017
Nord 400, 9:00 AM
NEC Seminar

Speaker: Daniel Young
Advisor: Dr. Bolu Ajiboye
Title: Artifact Reduction Techniques Enable Neural Control of FES Actuated Movements

Abstract
Hundreds of thousands of people live with loss of motor function due to spinal cord injury (SCI) and have indicated strong interest in neuroprosthetics that restore arm movements. Functional Electrical Stimulation has restored independence to people with spinal cord injuries, enabling activities such as eating, writing, and grooming. Intracortical brain computer interfaces (iBCI's) have been explored as potential command interfaces for neuroprosthetics because they can record neural activity related to complex reaching kinematics (10+ degrees of freedom) in humans with paralysis. In order to restore thought-controlled arm and hand movements after paralysis, our group implanted one participant with two recording intracortical microelectrodes in the left primary motor cortex and 24 stimulating intramuscular electrodes in the right limb.
However, iBCI's utilize precise recordings of microvolt sized signals while FES generates relatively larger electric fields in the paralyzed limbs. Electrical artifacts during stimulation can interfere with extracting accurate movement intentions and may limit the usefulness of iBCIs for control of FES prostheses. This work characterizes the stimulation artifacts we recorded on the intracortical microelectrodes and demonstrates their effect on our system performance. We implemented three cleaning methods for reducing the artifacts and present results comparing their effectiveness. The best cleaning method reduced artifact sizes by 2+ orders of magnitude and fully recovered neural information during stimulation periods. This method can be easily implemented in real time, enabling closed-loop brain control of both intramuscular and surface FES prosthetics.

Friday, February 10, 2017
8:30 AM, Wolstein 1413
NP Seminar

Speaker: Andre Machado, M.D.
Title: TBA

Friday, February 3, 2017
No Seminar

Friday, January 27, 2017
NEC Seminar

Nord 400, 9:00 AM
Speaker: Kubinar Gunalan
Advisor: Prof. Cameron McIntyre
Title: Methods to predict axonal activation in patient-specific models of deep brain stimulation

Abstract: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic region is an established clinical therapy for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. Most computational models of DBS predict the generation of action potentials in axons surrounding the stimulating electrode and clinical software tools employing axon stimulation models are now commonly used to estimate the volume of tissue activated. However, the simplifying assumptions used in various DBS models can have a substantial impact on the stimulation predictions. I will review a range of different computational models for predicting axonal activation, including McNeal-type, Warman-type, and Butson-type models, and evaluate their accuracy in the context of clinical subthalamic DBS. In general, the results demonstrate that simplified models perform poorly when compared to detailed McNeal-type models.

Friday, January 20, 2017
Neural Prosthesis Seminar

Wolstein Auditorium, 8:30 AM
Speaker: Stephen B. McMahon
Div. Neuroscience, Kings College London
Title: Chronic pain mechanisms and how they may be affected by spinal cord stimulation

Friday, January 13, 2017
NEC Seminar

Nord 400, 9:00 AM
Speaker: Rajat Shivacharan
Advisor: Prof. Dominique Durand

Title: Can neural activity propagate via electric fields?

Abstract: Although electric fields are frequently overlooked due to more prominent neuron to neuron communication such as synaptic transmission, current studies on epileptiform behavior strongly suggest electric field transmission can play an important role in neural propagation. Experiments conducted in our lab have shown that propagation of epileptiform behavior in rodent hippocampi propagates at a unique speed of 0.1 m/s and can take place in the absence of synaptic transmission, leaving electric field as the logical mode of transmission. However, none of these studies show that the spontaneous bursting activity is solely generated from electric fields. Using in vitro experiments, we test the hypothesis that spontaneous epileptiform activity in the hippocampus can propagate via electric fields.


2016

NOTE: No NEC seminars are scheduled for Friday, December 23 or Friday, December 30.

December 16, 2016
NEC Seminar

9:00 am, NORD 400
Speaker: Hillary Bedell
Advisor: Prof. Jeff Capadona
Title: Inhibiting CD14 on blood derived cells improves microelectrode performance

Abstract: Action potentials from individual neurons can be recorded from intracortical microelectrodes affording these devices much potential in basic research and rehabilitation applications. Unfortunately, the quality of the neural signal decreases over time. Neuroinflammatory mechanisms play a major role in intracortical microelectrode failure. Two of the biological pathways that contribute to the failure of these devices are the breakdown of the blood brain barrier with subsequent myeloid cell infiltration and the Cluster of Differentiation 14 (CD14) pathway. CD14 is a key co receptor involved in the recognition of extravasated serum proteins and cellular damage in the brain resulting from intracortical microelectrode implantation. My work aims to delineate the role of the CD14 pathway on infiltrating macrophages versus resident microglia and its effect on microelectrode performance. This study identifies a clear link between specific inflammatory/immunity pathways and the long-term performance of intracortical microelectrodes.

NOTE: special time and day
NP Seminar
Friday, December 9 - Wolstein Auditorium, 8:30 AM
Speaker: Jennifer L. Collinger, PhD; University of Pittsburgh, PM&R and VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System
Title: Intracortical sensorimotor neuroprosthetics for controlling a robotic arm and hand.

December 2, 2016
NEC Seminar

9:00 am, NORD 400
Speaker: Thomas Eggers
Advisor: Prof. Dominique Durand
Title: Extracting Neural Signals from Multi-Channel FINEs

Abstract: Upper limb amputations affect tens of thousands of individuals in the US alone. Recent advances in prosthesis design offer realistic hands capable lifelike movement, although mechanisms to control these advanced devices are not well developed. This is particularly true for transhumeral amputees, in which few residual muscles of the upper limb which can be interfaced with remain. To address this issue, we investigated using a multi-channel FINE to extract motor command signals directly from multi-fasciculated nerves. In this talk I will present our results from a chronic study recording sciatic activity in canines.

NOTE: special time and day
NP Seminar
Monday, November 14 - BRB 105, 12:15 pm
Speaker: Kris Famm, PhD - Vice President for Bioelectronics at GlaxoSmithKline
Title: Bioelectronic Medicine C-Created: Where We Stand on the Journey Towards Making Precision Neuromodulation Deliver Transformational Benefits for Patients Suffering from Chronic Disease

Nov 11, 2016
NEC Seminar

9:00 am, NORD 400
Speaker: John Hermann
Advisor: Prof. Jeff Capadona
Title: Therapeutic Inhibition of Innate Immunity to Improve Intracortical Microelectrode Longevity

Abstract: Signals recorded from intracortical microelectrodes can be used to control assistive devices for paralyzed individuals. However, intracortical microelectrodes often fail to consistently record usable signals over chronic time periods. Neuroinflammatory mechanisms related to the implanted electrode are hypothesized to contribute to intracortical microelectrode failures. Innate immunity pathways involving Toll-like receptors recognize molecular patterns associated with tissue damage and invading pathogens to promote inflammation. Thus, we hypothesize that inhibition of specific innate immunity pathways will improve the longevity of intracortical microelectrodes. We evaluated the effects of administering a small molecule inhibitor to the innate immunity co-receptor CD14 in mice implanted with intracortical microelectrodes by analyzing single unit activity and endpoint histology.

Nov 4, 2016
NEC Seminar

9:00 am, NORD 400
Speaker: Elizabeth Heald
Advisor: Prof. P.H. Peckham
Title: Volitional Myoelectric Activity in Lower Extremity of Human Subjects with Chronic Motor Complete Spinal Cord Injury

Note: I will be presenting this talk at the Society for Neuroscience annual meeting in San Diego on November 15. I will preview this 15-minute presentation with the NEC audience and will be looking for feedback and suggestions.

Abstract: Clinically, human spinal cord injuries (SCIs) are classified, based on the presence or absence of visible or palpable muscle contraction in key muscles below the injury, into motor incomplete or complete injuries. While this classification can be useful, the clinical exam does not include electrophysiological testing, and thus it lacks sensitivity to differentiate small levels of residual ability. Previous studies have demonstrated the presence of intact neuronal axons across the spinal cord lesion, even in those clinically diagnosed with complete SCI. Though in the past such low-level below-injury activity may have had limited utility, today’s rehabilitative and restorative technologies might be able to use this activity to assist or restore function to a person with SCI. Thus, quantifying residual volitional motor activity below the SCI is an important task, and a first step toward using this activity in a useful manner. In this talk, I will present the results of EMG screening from muscles of the lower extremity in 24 subjects with chronic, cervical SCI who had been classified as motor complete.

Oct 28, 2016
NEC Seminar

9:00 am, NORD 400
Speaker: Hamid Charkhkar
Advisor: Prof. Ronald Triolo
Title: Restoring natural sensation in lower limb amputees

Abstract: Over 85% of amputations in the United States involve the lower limb. The lower-limb amputees have increased risk for trips and falls, compromised ability to negotiate uneven terrain, decreased gait symmetry, and impaired balance at least in part due to the lack of appropriate sensory input. Except for the mechanical loads transferred to the residuum, or conscious visual attention, no lower limb prosthesis offers a permanent and reliable method to provide natural sensory feedback of the missing limb. Although there have been numerous attempts to provide such feedback via tactile or over-skin sensory substitution, nothing to date has successfully restored natural sensation that could be perceived immediately and directly as coming from the phantom limb. In this talk, I will share our latest findings on utilizing high-density electrode cuffs to restore sensation in the missing limb of a long-term (48 years) traumatic below-knee amputee.

Oct 21, 2016
Neuroprosthesis Seminar

Wolstein Research Building, Room 1413
Speaker: Rafael Carbunaru, Ph.D. VP Research and Development, Boston Scientific Neuromodulation
Title: Development of Advanced Neurostimulation Systems

Oct 14, 2016
NEC Seminar

9:00 am, NORD 400
Speaker: Hendrik Dewald
Advisor: Robert Kirsch
Title: Implanted EMG Prosthetic Control for Transradial Amputees

Abstract: Our work focuses on using electromyographic (EMG) signals from intramuscular electrodes for improved prosthetic control in transradial amputees. More advanced multi-degree of freedom (DOF) hands require more, and often simultaneous, commands to provide a more natural and intuitive interface. Numerous intramuscular electrodes will provide a more stable and selective acquisition system for the machine learning approach of an Artificial Neural Network (ANN). This presentation will cover work done over the past year using temporary fine wire intramuscular electrodes as well as permanently implanted percutaneous electrodes, focusing on virtual reality posture matching performance under varying conditions.

Sept 23, 2016
NEC Seminar

9:00 am, NORD 400
Speaker: Dr. Mohit Shivdasani
Senior Research Fellow
Bionics Institute, Australia
Title: The Bionic Vision Australia Suprachoroidal Retinal Prosthesis – Journey from Benchtop to Clinical Trials
Abstract: Over the last decade, retinal prostheses have emerged as the only regulatory-approved technology to restore vision in patients with profound blindness due to photoreceptor dystrophies such as Retinitis Pigmentosa. These devices work by electrically stimulating surviving retinal neurons via an array of electrodes, to elicit the perception of light flashes termed phosphenes. Multiple electrodes can be stimulated to build up the perception of an image using individual phosphenes. Several groups around the world including our own at Bionic Vision Australia have developed prostheses designed to provide useful vision for patients. In terms of anatomical placement, we have chosen to implant the retinal electrode array between the sclera and the choroid (suprachoroidal space). This approach provides unique advantages including the unprecedented ease of surgical implantation, robust mechanical stability in situ over the long term, the ability to cover a large area of the visual field and importantly, minimal risk of retinal trauma during and after insertion of the electrode array. This presentation will cover an overview the preclinical work required to realise such a prosthesis that went from benchtop research led to a world first phase-I clinical trial of this approach in just over three years. Results from the clinical trial will also be presented.

Sept 16, 2016
NEC Seminar

9:00 am, NORD 400
Speaker: Griffin Rial
Advisor: Prof. Capadona
Title: The Use of Antioxidant Therapies to Reduce Inflammation and Improve Performance of Intracortical Microelectrodes
Abstract: Intracortical microelectrode technology seeks to improve the quality of life of and restore function to severely paralyzed individuals. However, current clinical applications are limited due to their inability to adequately record neural information over long periods of time. The Capadona Lab is investigating the mechanism behind electrode failure. We have identified oxidative stress pathways as sources of both material-based and biological-based failure mechanisms. Current research is investigating the use of local antioxidant therapies to improve recording performance. Our lab is covalently attaching a biomimetic anti-oxidant molecule to the surface of the microelectrodes to assess its ability to improve recording function.

Sept 2, 2016
NEC Seminar

9:00 am, NORD 400
Speaker: Andrew Bazyk
Advisor: Dr. Jay Alberts
Title: Transforming Multiple Sclerosis Care Through Use of Mobile Technology and Large Data Analysis

Abstract: Advances in technology have allowed for an opportunity to collect both greater quantities and higher quality data. Our lab has developed an iPad based platform to objectively and quantitatively assess neurological function, with advantages over current clinical assessments. The goal of our current work is to better characterize Multiple Sclerosis using this platform. With a better characterization of Multiple Sclerosis, we hope to be able to more accurately track disease progression, provide interventions before an emergency room visit is needed and make predictions on how an individual will respond to medication.

August 26, 2016
NEC Seminar

9:00 am, NORD 400
Speaker: Joseph Marmerstein
Advisor: Dr. Durand
Title: Measuring Neural Activity in Small Peripheral Nerves with Carbon Nanotube Yarn Electrodes

Abstract: The study of small peripheral nerves such as those in the autonomic nervous system holds great promise for the detection and treatment of  a variety of pathologies. Dr. Durand's group has developed a novel way for interfacing with these nerves, via carbon nanotube (CNT) yarn electrodes. CNT yarn electrodes were implanted in the left cervical vagus and left glossopharyngeal nerves of rats over a 2+month period. During that period, the rats underwent a variety of physiological challenges while neural activity was recorded. Additionally, we introduce the use of CLARITY to stain and image whole peripheral nerves without disturbing the implanted electrodes. CLARITY is a technique developed by Dr. Karl Deisseroth (Stanford) which fixes proteins in place, and then clears out lipid bilayers, making the tissue nearly transparent and allowing fluorescent probes to diffuse through the tissue.

August 12, 2016
NEC Seminar

9:00 am, NORD 400
Speaker: Kelsey Bower
Advisor: Prof. McIntyre
Title: A Multimodal Imaging-Based Detailed Anatomical Model of the Human Head and Neck

Abstract: Computational models of the human body have long been used to conduct safety simulations for implanted medical devices. However, full body models often lack the necessary complexity required to conduct accurate studies of a specific organ system, especially with regard to medical devices in or near the head. Complex models of specific organ systems have proven to be time-consuming to develop, but are nonetheless necessary to evaluate and ensure the accuracy of computational simulations. In this study a detailed anatomical model of the human head was developed that includes an unprecedented number of distinct structures at submillimeter spatial resolution, representing one of the most detailed image-based anatomical head models available for computational life sciences.

August 5, 2016
NEC Seminar

9:00 am, NORD 400
Speaker: Platon Lukyanenko
Advisor: Dustin Tyler
Title: Mapping EMG to user intent in trans-radial amputee and able-bodied subjects

Abstract: A major part of research in the Tyler lab is focused on the DARPA haptix project. Among other things, the project requires the creation of a controller for a prosthetic hand which smoothly and independently controls three or more degrees of freedom in an intuitive manner. The presentation will cover progress on the data analysis component of this project. Data from able-bodied and implanted amputee subjects is mapped to expected user intent through Neural Networks.

July 29, 2016
NEC Seminar

9:00 am, NORD 400
Speaker: Brian Sanner
Advisor: Dr. Triolo
Title: Analysis of peripheral nerve electrical stimulation paradigms to reduce muscle fatigue

Abstract: For roughly two decades, Dr. Triolo’s Lab has been implanting electrical stimulators in individuals with spinal cord injury to use peripheral nerves to activate muscles that enable standing tasks to be performed. Current methods use constant stimulation of all relevant muscle groups, which causes rapid muscle fatigue, reducing functionality. Dr. Lee Fisher has shown that more advanced stimulation paradigms can prolong the time to fatigue. The advanced stimulation methods required frequent, manual tuning of parameters, which was time consuming and not practical for translational use. This study uses the cat model to test the exploitation of selectivity in stimulation, as well as sensitivity analysis of the available parameters, so the work can be translated to automate tuning of the stimulation paradigms. In addition, the data provided will act as control data for the future development of peripheral nerve interfaces for selective stimulation.

July 15, 2016
NEC Seminar

9:00 am, NORD 400
Speaker: Dr. Brooke Odle
Advisors: Dr. Musa Audu and Dr. Ronald Triolo
Title: Novel Controllers to Assume and Maintain Non-Erect, Task-Dependent Postures with Standing Neuroprostheses

Abstract: Neuroprostheses utilizing functional neuromuscular stimulation enable individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) to stand erect from seated position in their wheelchairs. To maintain erect posture, these devices supply constant supramaximal stimulation to the nerves/muscles of the lower extremities and trunk. Current stimulation patterns are customized to maintain a single erect posture. To assume a task-dependent (forward or side leaning) posture other than the nominal erect standing position, users must exert upper extremity (UE) force on a support device, such as a walker or countertop. These postural adjustments compromise the users’ UE function and standing balance. To address these issues, this work aims to develop and evaluate new controllers to enable users to assume and maintain non-erect, task-dependent postures. These advanced control systems should ultimately expand standing work volume, enable access to locations impossible to reach from the wheelchair or single vertical posture, reduce user effort and enhance safety and independence in home and community environments.

July 8, 2016
NEC Seminar

9:00 am, NORD 400
Speaker: Anisha Rastogi
Advisor: A. Bolu Ajiboye
Title: Evaluating force representation in motor cortex of an intracortical BCI user with chronic tetraplegia

Abstract: Intracortical brain-computer interfaces (iBCIs) have emerged as a promising assistive technology for restoring hand grasping in individuals with tetraplegia. To date, most BCIs have focused on decoding position- and velocity-related information, or kinematics, from the motor cortex, in order to control the motion of external effectors. However, natural hand grasping involves a combination of kinematic and kinetic (force-related) information. Incorporating kinetics into brain-computer interfaces could therefore enhance BCI functionality; however, the nature of how force is represented in the brain is not fully elucidated in individuals with chronic tetraplegia, who are incapable of executing forces. In this study, we characterize the extent of force-related neural modulation in a person with tetraplegia, and we assess the feasibility of incorporating force-modulated neural signals into human iBCI's. Specifically, we collected intracortical neural recordings from an individual with cervical spinal cord injury, while he observed, imagined, and attempted to produce four discrete levels of force. We extracted time-varying features from the neural data; assessed the extent of their modulation during the force task; and used them as inputs to a machine learning algorithm that predicted the participant's observed, imagined, and attempted force levels offline. Offline discrimination performance and the number of neural features tuned to force production tends to be greatest during attempted force, and least pronounced when production is observed. Additionally, tuned features exhibit various temporal profiles, with some tuned to the preparatory phase of force production, others tuned to active force production, and still others tuned to both phases. These results suggest that force-related information is retained in motor cortex in individuals with tetraplegia, and that it is feasible to incorporate cortical activity during attempted force production into iBCIs that restore hand grasping function.

June 24, 2016
NEC Seminar

9:00 am, NORD 400
Speaker: Nicholas Couturier
Advisor: Prof. Durand
Title: Sensory Stimulation for the Suppression of Seizures.

Abstract: Low Frequency Electrical Stimulation (LFES) has proven to be effective as an alternative treatment for refractory epilepsy. However, LFES requires brain surgery and deep implantation of electrodes in the brain. We investigated whether a non-invasive implementation of this method using low frequency sensory stimulation (LFSS) could provide an effective alternative to surgical resection or electrical stimulation for temporal lobe epilepsy.

June 17, 2016
NEC Seminar

9:00 am, NORD 400
Speaker: Ivana Cuberovic
Advisor: Prof. Dustin Tyler
Title: Implant of next generation cuff technology towards improving spatial selectivity of sensory feedback.

Abstract: Major amputation affects approximately 1.6 million people across the US. The majority of prosthetics development efforts have focused on designing mechanically anthropomorphic hands. In addition to intuitive motor control, restoring sensation of the missing limb is crucial for restoring normal capability. Furthermore, evoked sensations must be in functionally relevant locations. I hypothesize that nerve cuffs with higher contact density and use of multi-contact stimulation will improve our ability to selectively provide sensations across the hand. To address these goals, a 37-year-old male trans-radial amputee has been implanted with the next generation nerve cuff electrodes and stimulator technology. Beyond new hardware, achieving localized sensory percepts across the hand requires developing methods for rapid mapping. To that end, I present preliminary data on the use of intraoperative ultrasound to develop patient-specific, in-situ nerve models.

June 10, 2016
NEC Seminar

9:00 am, NORD 400
Speaker: Breanne Christie
Advisor: Dr. Ron Triolo and Dr. Dustin Tyler
Title: Long-Term Stability of Stimulating Multi-Contact Nerve Cuff Electrodes on Human Femoral Nerves

Abstract: Nerve cuff electrodes with multiple embedded conducting contacts are capable of selectively stimulating branches of the human femoral nerve. They can be used in neuroprostheses for the restoration of standing and stepping in people with spinal cord injury. The purpose of this study was to determine the long-term stability of multi-contact cuff electrodes in two human neuroprosthesis recipients in terms of charge threshold, joint moment, and selectivity for multiple years after implantation.

June 3, 2016
NEC Seminar

9:00 am, NORD 400
Speaker: Sarah Chang
Advisor: Dr. Ronald Triolo
Title: A Stimulation-Driven Exoskeleton for Walking after Paraplegia

Abstract: Stepping after paralysis due to spinal cord injury has been achieved using technologies such as neuromuscular stimulation, passive lower extremity bracing, powered lower limb exoskeletons, and hybrid neuroprostheses. This study evaluated our first successful implementation of a self-contained "muscle-first" hybrid neuroprosthesis and tested the system with three individuals with spinal cord injury.

May 27, 2016
NEC Seminar

9:00 am, NORD 400
Speaker: Natalie Cole
Advisor: Prof. Bolu Ajiboye
Title: Static synergy model used to reproduce time-varying muscle activation

Abstract: A long standing theory of motor control is that the neuromotor system simplifies control of multi-degree-of-freedom movements by recruiting coordinated patterns of muscle activation (muscle synergies), which are combined to produce motor output. Previous studies have extracted synergy patterns from animal models and human subjects.  It has been shown that muscle synergies can be extracted from a subset of hand postures and used to reconstruct a larger variety of hand shapes.  The hypothesis of this study was that the multiple degrees of freedom in muscle activation in the human hand can be reduced to a set of static synergistic activations from a sample of electromyographic (EMG) data and those synergies can be scaled to produce a variety of time-varying functional output.  In able-bodied persons, we recorded EMG from twelve intrinsic and extrinsic hand muscles.  Each subject performed static hand postures and dynamic functional tasks with object manipulation.  Synergies were extracted from average EMG recordings during static hand postures using a cross-validated non-negative matrix factorization decomposition algorithm. For each subject, the synergy model was used to reconstruct time-series EMG data.  It has been concluded that a static synergy model extracted from hand postures can explain the temporal changes in muscle activation during functional tasks and further investigation into using synergies in a motor control scheme is feasible.

May 20, 2016
NEC Seminar

9:00 am, NORD 400
Speaker: Swarna Solanki
Advisor: Prof. Kirsch
Title: Continuous estimation of needed upper extremity force assistance in cervical spinal cord injury

Abstract: A high cervical (C1-C4) spinal cord injury results in extensive paralysis of the upper extremity. Generally, these individuals cannot elevate their arms to accomplish activities of daily living and require assistance from care-givers or rehabilitative devices. We have found that devices designed to reanimate the paralyzed limb can enhance the action of muscles remaining under voluntary control. This study aims to evaluate the ability of individuals in this population to volitionally generate and control forces at their hand and continuously predict the force assistance required during a task.

May 13, 2016
FES Center NP Seminar

8:30 am, BRB 105
Speaker: Edward F. Chang, MD
Associate Professor in Residence of Neurological Surgery and Physiology
University of California, San Francisco
Co-Director, Center for Neural Engineering at UC Berkeley and San Francisco

Live stream video link at www.FEScenter.org/Seminar

April 22, 2016
FES Center NP Distinguished Seminar

8:30 am, Wolstein Auditorium
Speaker: Geoffrey Ling, MD, PhD
Associate Professor, Neurosciences Critical Care
Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine
The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Title: Innovating for Medicine using a DARPA approach

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April 15, 2016
NEC Seminar

9:00 am, NORD 400
Speaker: Emily Graczyk
Advisor: Prof. Tyler
Title: The neural basis of perceived intensity in natural and artificial touch

Abstract: Electrical stimulation of sensory nerves is a powerful tool for studying neural coding, because it can activate neural populations in ways natural stimulation cannot. Chronic electrical interfaces with the nerve can also be used to restore sensation to patients who have lost it. In the present study, we sought to elucidate the neural basis of perceived intensity in the sense of touch by assessing the sensory correlates of varying two parameters of nerve stimulation, pulse frequency and pulse width, that each has a distinct effect on the evoked neural activity. Specifically, two amputees, chronically implanted with peripheral nerve electrodes, performed each of three psychophysical tasks - intensity discrimination, magnitude scaling, and intensity matching - based on electrical stimulation. We found that stimulation pulse width and pulse frequency have systematic, cooperative effects on perceived tactile intensity and that the artificial tactile sensations can be reliably matched to skin indentations on the intact limb. We then identified a single quantity, derived from the stimulation parameters, that predicts the magnitude of artificial tactile percepts across all testing conditions. Based on principles of fiber recruitment, we deduced that this quantity determines the population spike count in the activated neural population. We conclude that population spike count drives the magnitude of tactile percepts and that sensory magnitude can be manipulated systematically by varying a single stimulation quantity.

April 8, 2016
NEC Seminar

9:00 am, NORD 400
Speaker: Max Freeberg
Advisor: Prof. Ron Triolo
Title: Tracking the Safety and Stability of Compliant, Composite, Flat Interface Nerve Electrodes (C-FINE)

Abstract: Functional neuromuscular stimulation can restore function to individuals with upper motor neuron injuries, such as spinal cord injury or stroke. Nerve cuff electrodes offer a potentially stable and selective method of activating peripheral nerves. The safety and stability of these interfaces is of paramount importance in creating a chronically functional interface. Here we report the pre-operative, intra-operative, and post-operative testing to track the safety and stability of the first-in-man implant of two 8-contact Compliant, Composite, Flat Interface Nerve Electrodes (C-FINE) on the femoral nerves of a man with a cervical level spinal cord injury. The electrodes have thus far had minimal impact on safety measures, including nerve conduction velocity, compound muscle action potential amplitude, and appearance of fibrillations. Recorded EMG and moment responses to electrode stimulation have remained stable while thresholds have risen as expected compared to implant.

April 7, 2016
FES Seminar

8:30 am, BRB 105
Speaker: Stephen J. Lewis, PhD
Professor of Pediatrics and Pharmacology
School of MedicineCase Western Reserve University
Title: Autonomic Nerves Regulate Nociceptive Processing

Abstract: Modulation of autonomic nerve activity affords opportunities to affect peripheral end-organ function by changing the firing rate of efferent (direct modulation) and/or sensory (direct and reflex modulation) fibers. Modulation of autonomic sensory nerve input to the brain also affects most neural circuits controlling basic physiological functions such as blood pressure, body temperature and breathing. It is also clear that sensory input from autonomic nerves that are not seen as traditional nociceptive processors influence nociceptive status. This presentation focuses on (1) the changes in nociceptive status in lightly-anesthetized adult male Sprague-Dawley rats resulting from activation or transection of peripheral autonomic and sensory nerves including, A. Vagal and hypoglossal structures (e.g., nodose ganglia, cervical vagus, sub-diaphragmatic vagus, aortic depressor nerve, superior laryngeal nerve, recurrent laryngeal nerve, inferior pharyngeal nerve, hypoglossal nerve, extra-carotid sinus nerve), B. Glossopharyngeal structures (e.g., petrosal ganglion, glossopharyngeal nerve, carotid sinus nerve), and C. Sympathetic structures (e.g., stellate ganglion, superior cervical ganglion, cervical sympathetic chain, and (2) the ability of the above manipulations to modify cardiopulmonary nociceptive input as elicited by systemic injections of 5-hydroxytrytamine. The results clearly implicate many of these peripheral structures in the tonic processing of nociceptive input independently of their traditional roles in regulation of cardiorespiratory function.

April 1, 2016
NEC Seminar

9:00am, NORD 400
Speaker: Frank Willett
Advisor: Professor Bolu Ajiboye
Title: Doubling brain-computer interface performance by using movement scale information from the motor cortex

Abstract: Intracortical brain-computer interfaces can restore movement to people with severe paralysis by recording movement signals from the brain and translating them into motion of an external effector (such as a robotic arm or computer cursor). In the first part of the talk, I will present evidence of novel "movement scale" information present in the neural activity of the primary motor cortex. Using only a linear transformation, it is possible to extract a one-dimensional signal from the neural activity that is small when the user wants to stop or make precise movements and is large when the user wants to make big movements (regardless of the movement direction). This signal is completely separate from typically-used aspects of the neural activity and is thus ignored by standard algorithms. In the second part of the talk, I will present a new decoding algorithm that incorporates the movement scale information. Using the new algorithm, our study participant can make computer cursor movements with a speed-to-precision ratio double that of currently used algorithms.

March 25, 2016
NEC Seminar

9:00am, NORD 400
Speaker: Cale Crowder
Advisor: Dr. Robert Kirsch
Title: Goal decoding from the human primary motor cortex for restoration of movement following spinal cord injury

Abstract: Cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) can result in paralysis of all four limbs — a condition known as tetraplegia. Recently, our research group has combined brain computer interfaces with percutaneous functional electrical stimulation (BCI-FES) to allow a tetraplegic study participant with a C4-level SCI to move his paralyzed arm with multiple degrees of freedom. Using this system, the participant was able to successfully drink coffee from a mug. In this seminar, we will discuss some of the known limitations of our system, and we will suggest methods for optimizing BCI-FES system performance. In particular, we will propose to couple an optimized system controller with a theoretical motor cortical goal-decoder. We hypothesize that this goal decoder will provide information regarding the endpoint of intended movements.

February 26, 2016
NEC Seminar

9:00am, NORD 400
Speaker: Dan Young
Advisor: Dr. Ajiboye
Title: Comparison of coordinate frames for cortical control of virtual and FES reach and grasp

Abstract: Human reaching movements can be described in an intrinsic, body-centered, joint based coordinate frame, or in an extrinsic global coordinate frame. Numerous studies show that both coordinate frames may be encoded by separate populations of neurons, but the optimal coordinate frame for implementing closed loop brain control of an arm neuroprosthesis is currently unknown. Using virtual reality, we studied one BrainGate2 clinical trial participant’s ability to control arm movements using both coordinate frames. This work helped inform our implementation of BCI control of a percutaneous FES system. In this talk, I present results from our virtual reality studies as well as demonstrations of the first cortically controlled FES system to restore reach and grasp to a person with chronic tetraplegia.

February 19, 2016
Neural Prosthesis Seminar

8:30am, BRB 105
Speaker: Elias Veizi MD, PhD
Title: Challenges in the Development of Novel Treatment Strategies for Neuropathic Pain: Clinical Applications of Neurostimulation

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Abstract
Neuropathic pain is a challenging condition to treat. It might best be considered as a collection of various pain states with a common feature being symptoms suggestive of dysfunction of peripheral nerves. Significant progress has been made in understanding of neurophysiologic changes that accompany peripheral nerve dysfunction. The development of therapeutic options for the treatment of neuropathic pain is complicated. Advances in technology along with emergence of new indications have expanded the clinical applications of electrical neuromodulation for treatment of neuropathic pain.

February 12, 2016
NEC Seminar

9:00am, NORD 400
Speaker: Kabilar Gunalan
Advisor: Prof. McIntyre
Title: Axon pathways activated during therapeutic deep brain stimulation

Abstract: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic region is an established clinical therapy for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. A fundamental biophysical effect of DBS is the generation of action potentials in axons surrounding the stimulating electrode. The subthalamic region is made up of multiple axonal pathways, and it is unclear which of these pathways are directly responsible for the therapeutic benefit (or side effects) generated by DBS. The goal of this work is to quantify the specific pathways directly activated by clinical DBS settings using patient-specific computational models of DBS. We have found that clinically effective stimulation most likely activates the subthalamopallidal, hyperdirect, and cerebellothalamic pathways. Further, preferential stimulation of different pathways is possible but is dependent upon the patient-specific anatomy, electrode position, and stimulation parameter settings.

February 5, 2016
NEC Seminar

9:00am, NORD 400
Speaker: Anneke Frankemolle
Advisor: Prof. McIntyre
Title: Stimulation induced dysarthria

Abstract: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subthalamic nucleus is an established therapy for patients with Parkinson’s disease. Although DBS improves the patients’ motor symptoms, it is associated with side effects. One of the most disabling side effects, from a patient’s perspective, is dysarthria: a motor speech disorder that leads to loss in communication and social isolation.

Activation of specific pathways is suspected to be responsible for stimulation induced side effects. This project will systematically couple clinical speech outcomes with patient-specific computational models to identify the pathways that are involved with dysarthria. Such coupling would assist in adjusting the stimulation parameters to avoid dysarthria and consequently improve the patient’s quality of life.

January 22, 2016
NEC Seminar
9:00am, NORD 400
Speaker: Dr. Colin Drummond
Title: I am a researcher, why is medical billing relevant to me?

Abstract: Gone are the days when the practical application of scientific discoveries had self-evident value in the marketplace. Although researchers and designers have always considered “cost” as a parameter of interest, “reimbursement” looms much larger now in an era of accountable care and razor-thin hospital profit margins. This presentation provides an overview of the basics of medical coding, device coding and reimbursement today, as well as offering perspectives on the relevance this has on everyone connected to medical device and system development. Some of the dynamics that impact investability in new products are discussed, wherein “value” to various stakeholders often transcends cost and performance.

Dr. Drummond: In January 2015, Dr. Drummond re-joined the Department of Biomedical Engineering as Professor and Assistant Chair with a specific focus on expanding experiential design courses and professional practice preparation; he is also the Faculty Director for the Masters of Engineering and Management Program. Colin’s research on healthcare IT, informatics, entrepreneurship and innovation is balanced by translational research in biosensors and informatics, resulting in collaboration and secondary appointments in the School of Medicine and the University Hospitals Case Medical Center. Most recently, Colin was with the School of Nursing. From 2008-2013, Colin was the Director of the Coulter-Case Translational Research Partnership (CCTRP) in the Department of Biomedical Engineering. He received his doctorate degree from Syracuse University in 1985 and an MBA in 1997. Professor Drummond spent 20 years in industry before joining CWRU in 2008.

January 15, 2016
Neural Prosthesis Seminar

8:30am, BRB 105
Speaker: Jerry Silver, PhD
Title: Functional Regeneration Beyond the Glial Scar. Flyer
This seminar will be webstreamed; please view the live webstream at http://www.fescenter.org/Seminar


2015

December 18, 2015
Neural Prosthesis Seminar

8:30am, BRB 105
Speaker: Lena Ting, PhD
Title: Neuromechanical Principles Underlying Sensorimotor Modularity: Implications for Rehabilitation

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Abstract
solutions for movement. Although the theoretical and experimental evidence is debated, I will present arguments for consistent structures in motor patterns, i.e., motor modules, that are neuromechanical solutions for movement that are particular to an individual and shaped by evolutionary, developmental, and learning processes. In particular, I will demonstrate how computational analysis of muscle activity in gait and balance reveal consistent structure in muscle coordination that coordinate muscles to achieve motor goals requiring multi-joint movement. Moreover, both individual differences and trial by trial adaptation of these structures reflect higher, task-level modulation of motor goals. As such, different aspects of the modular structure of neuromotor output may be attributable to neural computations at different levels of the nervous system. Therefore, examining how such modular organization is disrupted in and improved through rehabilitation in spinal cord injury, stroke, and Parkinson’s disease may lead to a better understanding of the causal nature of modularity and its underlying neural substrates.

November 20, 2015
NEC Seminar
9:00am, NORD 400
Speaker: John Herman
Title: Innate Immune Inhibition to Enhance Intracortical Microelectrode Performance
Advisor: Prof. Capadona

Abstract: Intracortical microelectrodes have enormous potential in both basic research and rehabilitation applications. Unfortunately, widespread implementation of intracortical microelectrodes is limited due to inconsistent recording quality over time. Neuroinflammatory mechanisms are hypothesized to contribute to loss of recording quality. Innate immune pathways promote inflammation in response to molecular patterns associated with tissue damage. Thus, we hypothesize that inhibition of innate immune pathways will improve the quality and stability of intracortical microelectrode recordings over time. In this study we examine the role of innate immune receptors in the neuroinflammatory response to implanted intracortical microelectrodes using knockout mice as well as systemically administered small molecule inhibitors. Further, we examine the effect of innate immune inhibition on intracortical microelectrode recording quality over time.

November 13, 2015
Neural Prosthesis Seminar

8:30am, Biomedical Research Building, Room 105
Speaker: Polina Anikeeva, PhD
Assistant Professor, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Title: Interrogating Neural Circuits with Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials

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Abstract
The mammalian nervous system is often compared to an electrical circuit, and its dynamics and function are governed by ionic currents across the membranes of neurons. Many neurological disorders are characterized by inhibited/amplified neural activity in a particular region or lack of communication between the two regions of the nervous system. Current approaches to treatment of these disorders have limited effectiveness, and often rely on mechanically invasive and bulky devices. There is a pressing need for biocompatible materials and devices allowing for precise minimally invasive manipulation and monitoring of neural activity.

In Bioelectronics Group, we are taking two complimentary materials approaches to neural recording and stimulation: (1) Flexible polymer and hybrid optoelectronic fibers for intimate neural interfaces; (2) Magnetic nanomaterials for minimally invasive manipulation of neural activity. In my talk, I will illustrate how a fabrication process inspired by optical fiber production yields flexible multifunctional probes capable of optical, electronic and pharmacological interfaces with neural tissues in vivo1,2. I will then demonstrate how these fiber-based neural probes can be tailored to applications within a specific part of nervous system such as the brain or spinal cord. Finally, my talk will cover materials synthesis and physics that enable minimally invasive neural stimulation via functional fusion of magnetic nanomaterials and ion channels on neuronal membranes3. I will describe applications of the remote magnetothermal paradigm in stimulation of intact brain circuits, and illustrate how materials design can enable multiple interrogation modalities with alternating magnetic fields.

November 6, 2015
NEC Seminar

Cancelled

October 30, 2015
NEC Seminar
9:00am, NORD 400
Speaker: Elizabeth Heald
Title: An Investigation of Below-Injury Myoelectric Signals in Complete SCI
Advisor: Prof. Peckham

Abstract: Having a sufficient number and quality of control sources is a very important component of our goal of restoring multiple functions in a neuroprosthetic system. We are investigating the use of below-injury EMG as a possible source for control. In most subjects diagnosed with complete SCI, we are still able to record some EMG activity from distal below-injury muscles. This presentation will detail our plans to implement a biofeedback-based training protocol for improving the command signal properties of these signals. Successful implementation of this training could lead to below-injury signals being incorporated into a multi-function neuroprosthetic system.

October 23, 2015
NEC Seminar

9:00am, NORD 400
Presenter: Julie Murphy
Advisor: Dr. Ron Triolo
Title: Developing Selective Stimulation Paradigms with a 16-channel C-FINE

Abstract: Standing after spinal cord injury using electrical stimulation depends on, among many other factors, how much moment the stimulated muscles can produce and how long they can produce that moment. Nerve cuff electrodes with multiple channels can be used to selectively stimulate different synergistic muscles in a revolving pattern in order to give fibers a chance to rest and ideally prolong standing. To find the optimal parameter set to achieve this goal, a C-FINE (compliant flat interface nerve electrode) will be chronically implanted on the feline sciatic to stimulate ankle plantar and dorsiflexors. This seminar will discuss the initial selectivity results during acute feline implants and the plans to develop a controller to automatically tune stimulation paradigms to produce a constant ankle moment.

October 16, 2015
NEC Seminar

9:00am, NORD 400
Presenters: Tom Mortimer and Andrew Shoffstall
Title: Every Graduate of the Neural Engineering Center Should Know before leaving Case
Fun Topic: What Many Women Think Men Should Know, Especially Those Male Products of Neural Engineering Center

October 9, 2015
NEC Seminar

9:00am, NORD 400
Speaker: Luis Gonzales-Reyes
Title: GABAergic interneurons are the cellular source of the morphogen protein Sonic Hedgehog in the adult hippocampus. Anatomical, optogentic and toxicological evidence

Abstract
Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is a trophic protein that induces proliferation and differentiation in the CNS during development and is potentially involved in neuroplasticity and neural repair in the adult brain. Although, Shh has been shown to influence dentate gyrus (DG) adult neurogenesis, both the cellular source of the molecule and the mechanism of Shh release in the adult brain remain undetermined. Recently, it has been reported that optogenetic stimulation of GABA neurons has a regulatory effect on adult neurogenesis, but it is still not understood how GABAergic neurons can induce both trophic and inhibitory actions simultaneously. Here, we used immunohistochemistry, optogenetic and toxicological strategies to evaluate the source of Shh in the hippocampus. We found that GABAergic neurons in the hilus and SGZ neurogenic niches are the source of local Shh in the DG. This finding suggests that many of the actions attributed to GABA transmission can operate through the Shh signaling pathway. Selective stimulation of GABA neurons from the hilus using optogenetic leads to upregulation of Shh pathway members transcription (Shh, Ptc-1, Gli-1,2,3) in the DG. The GABAergic neurons that express Shh were selectively resistant to kainic acid toxicity, showing that Shh confers a survival advantage to Shh positive GABAergic neurons in DG and CA1/CA3 sub-regions of the hippocampus. Furthermore, stimulation of Shh signaling pathway by a Smoothened agonist induced antiepileptic effects in the KA model of epilepsy.

October 2, 2015
Neural Prosthesis Seminar

8:30am, Tinkham Veale Senior Classroom, Room 134
Speaker: D Michael Ackermann, PhD
President and CEO
Oculeve Incorporated
Title: Neurostimulation Therapy for Dry Eye & Spinning Out a Med-Tech Start-up from a University

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Abstract
Oculeve Incorporated was founded from the Stanford University Biodesign program in 2012. The company developed a neurostimulation therapy for dry eye disease, which has since been approved in Europe, Canada and Australia. The product is currently undergoing it's US pivotal trial, and the company was recently acquired by Allergan, Inc. The lecture will tell the Oculeve story with focus on the spin-out from the University.

September 25, 2015
NEC Seminar

9:00 am NORD 400
Speaker: Allison Hess-Dunning, Ph.D.
Title: Bio-inspired Systems Toward Locally-Responsive Brain Interfaces

Long-term, reliable interfaces to the nervous system require seamless integration between the engineered device and the biological system. Existing intracortical interfaces integrate poorly with the tissue, resulting in challenges relating to long-term viability and reliability. A tissue-like polymer nanocomposite enhances bio-integration, but requires innovative microfabrication strategies to be built into a functional device. During this talk, I will describe the development of a mechanically-dynamic neural probe for electrical signal recording. The neural probe serves as the first step toward locally-responsive devices capable not only of neural recording, but also other modalities of interfacing with tissue. Specifically, neurochemical sensing and microfluidic drug delivery capabilities currently under development will be discussed.

September 11, 2015
NEC Seminar

9:00am NORD 400
Speaker: Andrew Shoffstall, Ph.D.
Title: "Healthcare Strategy Consulting: What It Is and My Lessons Learned"

Topics Covered:
* Overview of types of consulting careers available with a Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering
* Types of projects a healthcare strategy consultant works on
* The consulting process (day-to-day)
* Key takeaways for researchers and NEC

September 4, 2015
NEC Seminar

9:00am NORD 400
Dr. Nathan Makowski
Title: Title: Improving walking after stroke with an implanted neuroprosthesis for hip, knee and ankle control: a case report

Stroke is a leading cause of disability and many stroke survivors have difficulty walking. Through weakness and impaired coordination, patients lose movement at the hip, knee, and ankle. Many patients would benefit from an intervention that addresses impairment at each joint. A fully implanted Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) system to improve walking was tested in a participant after stroke.

The FES system was implanted with channels to assist hip, knee, and ankle movement. After implantation, a stimulation pattern that coordinated stimulation timing was created to assist with movement. The participant practiced walking with stimulation in the laboratory. The participant was evaluated three times: 1) before training without stimulation, 2) after training without stimulation, and 3) after training with stimulation. The data demonstrate the contributions of a multi-channel FES system to post-stroke walking and compare the effects of training and walking with the device on and off.

August 14, 2015
NEC Seminar

9:00am NORD 400
Remy Niman: Development of an Ankle Moment Transducer for Intraoperative Testing of Nerve Cuff Electrodes
Advisor: RJ Triolo

Joonhyuk Lee: Application of a Viable Closed-Loop Sensor System in FES Cycling
Advisor RJ Triolo

Nathan Kostick: title TBA
Advisor DM Duran

August 14, 2015
NEC Seminar

9:00am NORD 400
Speaker: Ivana Cuberovic
Advisor: Prof. Tyler
Title: "Toward Creating a Sensation of Stereognosis in Amputees using Nerve Stimulation"

Current efforts to restore sensation in upper limb amputees through extraneural electrical stimulation have proven successful at generating sensations at individual locations. Sensory neuropsychology shows that spatio-temporal combination of individual sensations results in more complex percepts such as motion or shape perception. Specifically, stereognosis (tactile object recognition) requires the integration of cutaneous and proprioceptive feedback across the hand. We hypothesize that we can recreate the perception of stereognosis using electrical stimulation. Current hardware is limited in its ability to produce such stimuli patterns, thus necessitating the development of more flexible hardware. This presentation will give an overview of our lab’s current efforts towards eliciting stereognosis and will provide details on key aspects of software development for improved control of stimulation.

August 13, 2015
Neuromodulation presentation

10:00 am, Wolstein 6th floor classroom
Speaker: Cora de Hemptinne, Ph.D., University of California San Francisco
Subject: Therapeutic deep brain stimulation reduces cortical phase-amplitude coupling in Parkinson's disease.

August 7, 2015
NEC Seminar

9:00am, NORD 400
Speaker: Nicholas Couturier
Advisor: Dr. Durand
Title: “Sensory Stimulation for the Suppression of Seizures”

Low Frequency Electrical Stimulation (LFES) has proven to be effective as an alternative treatment for refractory epilepsy. However, LFES requires brain surgery and deep implantation of electrodes in the brain. We investigated whether a non-invasive implementation of this method using low frequency sensory stimulation (LFSS) could provide an effective alternative to surgical resection or electrical stimulation for temporal lobe epilepsy.

July 31, 2015
NEC Seminar

9:00am, NORD 400
Speaker: Aditya Girish
Advisor: Prof. Erin Lavik
Title: “Hemostatic Nanoparticles: Applications in Blast Trauma & Maximizing Clotting Parameters”

Blast trauma injuries account for the overwhelming majority of battlefield deaths. Primary blast injury leads to uncontrolled hemorrhage in sensitive organs, including the brain and spinal cord, which is linked with the high mortality rates. Despite advances in protective equipment that can increase chances of surviving blasts, victims often face a reduction in cognitive ability and endure severe psychological problems. Past studies involving rodents subjected to full body blasts have validated hemostatic nanoparticles as an intervention to stave off life-threatening hemorrhage. Ongoing blast trauma experiments in collaboration with Virignia Tech have focused on using drug-loaded hemostatic nanoparticles, and evaluating behavioral outcomes in surviving rodents as metrics of neurological state post-injury. Concurrent in vitro work focuses on re-engineering nanoparticles in order to further enhance and accelerate the clotting process upon severe injury.

July 24, 2015
NEC Seminar

9:00am, NORD 400
Speaker: Rajat Shivacharan
Title: “ Can neural activity propagate via electric fields?”

Although electric fields are frequently overlooked due to more prominent neuron to neuron communication such as synaptic transmission, current studies on epileptiform behavior strongly suggest electric field transmission can play an important role in neural propagation. Experiments conducted in our lab have shown that propagation of epileptiform behavior in rodent hippocampi propagates at a unique speed of 0.1 m/s and can take place in the absence of synaptic transmission, leaving electric field as the logical mode of transmission. However, none of these studies show that the spontaneous bursting activity is solely generated from electric fields. Using in vitro experiments, we test the hypothesis that spontaneous epileptiform activity in the hippocampus can propagate via electric fields.

July 10, 2015
NEC Seminar

9:00am, NORD 400
Speaker: Hillary Bedell
Advisor: Dr. Capadona
Title: “Targeting peripheral blood-derived cells to reduce inflammation at the neural interface”

We are in the “Era of the Brain”. A large part of the United States’ current BRAIN Initiative is to develop new and improve existing technologies used to drastically increase our understanding of the brain, both healthy and diseased states. Our lab is part of an ongoing effort to understand why devices fail so we can improve existing technologies to perform to their full potential. One of the devices used to increase our knowledge of the brain and aid in rehabilitation for patients with neurological disorders is the intracortical microelectrode. Our lab has previously identified two biological pathways that play a role in the failure of these devices: the breakdown of the blood brain barrier with subsequent myeloid cell infiltration and a specific inflammatory pathway. The overarching goal of my project is to learn more about the role infiltrating blood-derived cells play in the failure of intracortical microelectrodes to identify a more translational therapeutic approach. Over the past year I have spent my time on my first aim: determining if the CD14 pathway and infiltration of myeloid cells are interconnected. Thus, in my presentation I will detail the background of my project and the steps taken to date.

June 24, 2015
Special Lecture
1:00pm, NORD 400
Speaker: Manfred Franke
Title: Practical Point of View on Patents

We will answer a few questions to start with and then dive into Q&A to make things more practical:

- What is worth covering with IP - aka "Does it enable a new device path, treatment approach or even industry direction?"
- Why it is worth covering as IP - aka "It's $ 5 to 10 k to secure a patent. Does the patent have a true shot at returning that with a factor of 10x or more?"
- Who to approach to decide on q1 and q2 - a good friend aware of the field, one's own PI, Wayne and Case TTO, eventually Tarolli et al.
- What's the patenting process like with Case and Tarolli et al?
- Why "first patent then publish" and what that means (coversheet provisional a day before posters out etc.)

The plan is for about 30 minutes of lecture to get the basics covered and the questions listed above answered. Te remaining 30 minutes are for Q&A with examples students can provide or some that I will have as a backup.

Background:
Students generally learn that to "Write a paper!" is the most important step to graduate school while ignoring the potential that intellectual property (IP) can provide. Students know of the existence of patents, trademarks etc. but have often no idea how IP may be beneficial for them today at Case. Some students even consider patents a bad thing "because knowledge should be public and everyone's to own" without understanding that that's exactly what patents do. By giving students an idea on how to present a conception to others with drawings, formulations and bullet points, I further hope to ease their first steps in the process of deciding it's patentability and getting their message conveyed to Case's Tech Transfer Office (Case TTO).

The lecture is coordinated with Bob Kirsch, Colin Drummond, Wayne Hawthorn (Case TTO), Stephen Fening (Case Coulter) and Craig Hayden (Tarolli et al).

June 12, 2015
NEC Seminar

9:00am, NORD 400
Speaker: Emily Graczyk
Advisor: Dr. Tyler
Title: “Creating tactile sensation: population coding by extraneural nerve stimulation”

Recent literature suggests that coding of tactile sensation in the periphery may depend on the summated responses of a population of activated neurons rather than individual neuron firing rates. By stimulating peripheral nerves with extraneural cuffs, we are able to stimulate populations of sensory neurons and may be able to better replicate innate neural coding than is possible with intraneural electrodes. We are investigating the psychometrics of tactile sensation intensity resulting from peripheral nerve stimulation within the context of population coding. Our goals are to understand how stimulation manipulations affect the intensity of perceived sensations in human subjects and to use our findings in conjunction with models of electrical nerve excitation to further elucidate tactile coding in the peripheral nerve.

June 5, 2015
NEC Seminar

9:00am, NORD 400
Speaker: Frank Willett
Advisor: Dr. Ajiboye
Title: “A Feedback Control Model of Brain-Computer Interfacing”

Intracortical brain-computer interfaces (iBCIs) seek to restore movement and communication to paralyzed individuals by recording cortical neural activity and re-routing it to an external device, such as a robotic arm or computer cursor. iBCIs create a novel feedback loop whose dynamics are determined by the plant (e.g., the mechanical properties of a robotic arm), the noise properties created when decoding from a limited number of stochastic neurons, and the control strategy adopted by the user. Here, we model the feedback loop that emerges when the user’s cortical activity is mapped to 2D cursor velocity with first order smoothing dynamics. Our model can simulate subject-specific reaching movements that are visually indistinguishable from those of three human participants (BrainGate 2 clinical trial) and whose quantitative aspects (movement time, reach straightness, etc.) match those of the user accurately. Using novel methods, we show that the user’s control strategy and use of visual feedback is proficient and adapted to the dynamics of the cursor. The main performance limiting factor appears to be signal independent decoding noise, which pushes the cursor about randomly and does not scale in proportion to the user’s motor command (making it present even when the user intends to stop). Our model could improve iBCI performance by enabling researchers to optimize system parameters in a user-specific way and test more innovations than would be possible in a real user. Our control strategy model could also improve decoder building procedures by more accurately parameterizing the user’s intent.

May 29, 2015
NEC Seminar

9:00am, NORD 400
Speaker: Anna Crawford
Advisor: Dr. Ron Triolo
Title: “Automatic Detection of Destabilizing Wheelchair Conditions for Modulating Actions of Neuroprostheses to Maintain Seated Posture”

Many individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) use wheelchairs as their predominate form of transportation resulting in injuries related to wheelchair related incidents. Functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) has been shown to be effective in wheelchair population over level ground at a comfortable speed, but less effective in other more strenuous tasks. FNS has also been shown to be able to return users to an erect position after a disturbance. The goal of this study is to use wireless sensor accelerometer and gyroscopic technology in order to detect potentially disturbing conditions. By detecting potentially disturbing events, appropriate FNS can be applied in order to keep the user more stable in their chair and prevent injury.

May 22, 2015
NEC Seminar

9:00am, NORD 400
Speaker: Sarah Chang
Advisor: Dr. Ron Triolo
Title: “Designing Orthotic Mechanisms to Control the Stand-to-Sit Maneuver for Individuals with Paraplegia ”

Individuals with paraplegia can use functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) to accomplish sit-to-stand, standing, and stand-to-sit maneuvers. Stand-to-sit (STS) requires eccentric contractions or lengthening of the active quadriceps muscle. However, eccentric contractions are not well controlled with FNS due to a lack of feedback to the extensor muscles during the maneuver. STS using only FNS results in large impact forces at initial contact with the seating surface, high knee angular velocities, and a heavy reliance on the upper limbs. In this study, we are designing and evaluating two different orthotic approaches for controlling the stand-to-sit transition for recipients of implanted neuroprostheses with spinal cord injury.

May 15, 2015
NEC Seminar

9:00am, NORD 400
Speaker: Anisha Rastogi
Advisor: Prof. Bolu Ajiboye
Title: “Role of Motor Imagery in Modulation of the Motor Cortex ”

Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) can potentially replace or restore lost motor functions in paralyzed patients by utilizing voluntary, movement-related neural signals to control external effectors. The goal of our work is to elucidate the role of motor imagery – defined as the conscious, kinesthetic imagination of movements – in BCI performance. According to several research endeavors, BCI users do not typically use conscious motor imagery to perform closed-loop BCI control, unless instructed to do so. However, previous literature has suggested that a person’s skill at motor imagery is correlated to their ability to voluntarily modulate neural activity within the motor cortex, the typical source of command signals for BCIs. Our work seeks to determine whether motor imagery training, which has been shown to enhance neural modulation of the motor cortex, translates to improved BCI performance. We also investigate the role of motor imagery in pre-surgical planning of electrode placement for invasive BCIs.

April 20, 2015
Epilepsy Grand Rounds
8:00 AM
Frohring Auditorium, Room 105 of the Biomedical Research Building
Speaker: Nitin Tandon, MD, Associate Professor, Neurosurgery & Pediatric Surgery, University of Texas Medical School.
Topic: Windows on the Mind: Insights into Human Cognition from Intracranial Recordings

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April 10, 2015
MAE Seminar

12:30pm, Glennan, 421
Speaker: Thomas Bulea Ph.D.
Title: Mobile Brain Imaging for Device Augmented Neurorehabilitation

Abstract
Recent advances in neuroimaging have resulted in techniques that are capable of recording human brain activity in a wide range of environments. Noninvasive methods now enable the study of cortical activity during mobile activities and therefore offer tremendous potential to improve understanding of human motor control and accelerate new therapies for neurological impairments. The Functional and Applied Biomechanics Section of the National Institutes of Health is developing new ways to harness these imaging modalities to improve motor rehabilitation of individuals with central nervous system injuries, with a particular focus on pediatric populations. This talk will illustrate state-of-the art mobile neuroimaging as one component of a multi-modal motion capture laboratory for developing innovative neurorehabilitation paradigms. We will discuss recent advances developed in our lab, including application of powered exoskeletons, surface functional electrical stimulation (FES), user-driven treadmills, and other device augmented therapies for gait rehabilitation in adults and children with cerebral palsy. This work will be explored in the context of other relevant advances to discuss future directions for improving functional recovery in individuals with neurological disorders.

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April 3, 2015
NEC Seminar

9:00am, NORD 400
Speaker: Natalie Cole
Title: Using Extracted Muscle Coordination Patterns for Motor Control

Abstract
Functional Electrical Stimulation has been used to restore hand function to individuals with spinal cord injury at the C5 and C6 levels. The goal of our work is to develop a generalizable and systematic method for creating muscle coordination patterns for producing a wide variety of hand patterns. Current literature has suggested that the neuromotor system coordinates complex movements through a hierarchical system known as muscle synergies, where groups of muscles, rather than individual muscles, are controlled. Our work aims to quantify the underlying synergy patterns of muscle activation during hand manipulation tasks during activities of daily living, specifically teasing out their spatial and temporal correlations. These extracted patterns can then be used to develop improved FES hand systems.

March 20, 2015
Neural Prosthesis Seminar

8:30am, BRB 105
Speaker: Leo Cohen, MD
Chief, Human Cortical Physiology
and Stroke Neurorehabilitation Section
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
Title: “Learning, Reward and Brain Stimulation in Neurorehabilitation”

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Abstract
Exercise and training have long been used to improve motor function after stroke. Better training strategies and therapies based on motor learning principles to enhance the effects of these rehabilitative protocols are currently being developed for poststroke disability. Improvement in our understanding of the neuroplastic processes associated with poststroke motor impairment and understanding of the mechanisms of neuroplasticity is crucial to this effect. Reward has proven an influential factor in neuroplasticity and as a tool to enhance training effects. Pharmacological, biological and electrophysiological interventions that enhance neuroplasticity are explored to further expand the boundaries of poststroke rehabilitation. This presentation aims to provide a focused overview of neuroplasticity associated with motor learning and reward in health and after injury and its interactions. Experimental interventions are being developed to manipulate neuroplasticity to enhance motor rehabilitation in humans. Possible differences in motor skill learning affected after stroke will be discussed.

March 12, 2015
Ph.D. Dissertation Defense

9:00am, NORD 400
Speaker: Brian Murphy, Ph.D. Candidate
Advisor: A. Bolu Ajiboye, Ph.D.
Title: "Subsurface Cortical Recordings for Prediction of Hand Grasp Function"

Abstract: Roughly 130,000 people in the US suffer from high level spinal cord injury resulting in loss of hand function. Brain-machine interfaces (BMI) combined with functional electrical stimulation (FES) have the potential to restore movement to paralyzed individuals’ arms and hands. Cortical signals related to grasp have been studied in non-human primates as well as in humans but primarily from surface cortical structures. Imaging studies suggest that some subsurface cortical areas, such as inside of central sulcus and the insular cortex, are also active during hand grasping and force tasks. These regions are hard to record from using traditional invasive BMI technologies such as electrocorticographic grids and microelectrode arrays. Stereoencephalographic (SEEG) depth electrodes could provide a means to record signals from these hard to reach subsurface areas. This project aimed to determine if signals related to hand grasp posture and force could be recorded from these subsurface structures and if they could be used for prediction of grasp posture or force.

This study demonstrated that signals from SEEG electrodes could be used to differentiate between resting and movement or force production periods. It also showed that these signals could be used to classify and decode grasp force level in some participants and could be used to classify between different combinations of grasp postures. In two participants, it was also shown that imagined grasping trials could be discriminated from rest periods but different imagined grasps could not be discriminated. The signals recorded from the motor cortex wall of central sulcus and primary sensory cortex gave the best classification and decoding accuracies. Contacts placed in insular cortex also gave above chance classification of move versus rest for some participants. The results of this study show that signals recorded from subsurface cortical areas (especially the motor bank of central sulcus) using SEEG depth electrodes can be used for prediction of grasp posture and force level and should be considered as implantation sites for further BMI studies.

March 6, 2015
NEC Seminar

9:00am, NORD 400
Speaker: Anneke Frankemolle
Advisor: Dr. McIntyre
Title: “Improving speech quality in Parkinson’s disease patients with deep brain stimulation”

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subthalamic nucleus is an established therapy for patients with Parkinson’s disease. Although DBS improves the patients’ motor symptoms, it is associated with adverse effects. One of the most disabling adverse effects, from a patient’s perspective, is dysarthria: a motor speech disorder that leads to loss in communication and social isolation.

Activation of specific pathways is suspected to be responsible for stimulation induced adverse effects. We propose to systematically couple clinical speech outcomes with patient-specific neurostimulation models to identify the pathways that are involved with dysarthria. Such coupling would assist in adjusting the stimulation parameters to avoid dysarthria and consequently improve the patient’s quality of life.

February 24, 2015
Ph.D. Dissertation Defense

1:00pm, Wickenden Building, Room 307
Speaker: Mingming Zhang, PhD Candidate
Advisor: Prof. Durand
Title: "Septo-temporal Patterns and Mechanisms of Neural Propagation"

Abstract:
Understanding how neural signal conduction is important for learning normal brain functions and delivering neuromodulation therapy. However, it is not clear how in many cases neural activity propagates in the brain. To study neural propagation, we adopted the unfolded hippocampus in-vitro preparation from rodent animals. The combination of the unfolded hippocampus with penetrating microelectrode array (PMEA) is a powerful tool to monitor neural signal propagation in a large area of the hippocampal network.

Previous studies in the unfolded hippocampus using PMEA show that 4-AP-induced spontaneous activity could propagate in a diagonal wave front across the entire hippocampus. Further experiments showed that propagation is independent of either synaptic transmission or gap junction conductions, but is consistent with an electrical field effect. In addition, in a train of activity with various firing spikes. This could be interpreted by a change in the propagating direction. However, it was determined that the source of the spikes moved within the hippocampus. This particular pattern is consistent over a large number of experiments in different hippocampal preparation from both sides of the brain hemisphere.
Overall, this study shows spiking activity in the hippocampus can take place at a speed of about 0.12 m/s. The prevalence of non-synaptic propagation across several experimental approaches suggests that there exists a common mechanism mediating the neural signal travelling in the brain associated with the change of extracellular electrical field. Moreover, further analysis shows that source of these spikes is itself moving by a slower speed of about 0.01 m/s. Therefore, these results indicate a novel type of neural activity propagation mechanisms in the hippocampus. This could be important to explain how neural activity can be synchronized across neural tissue.

February 6, 2015
NEC Seminar

9:00am, NORD 400
Speaker: Yazan Dweiri
Advisor: Prof. Durand
Title: “Selective recording of physiological activity within peripheral nerves: Chronic study in Canine”

There is a growing interest in the field of peripheral nerve interface as an approach to revolutionize prosthetics. The neural activity controlling the action of skeletal muscles are accessible directly from the PNS and can be utilized to provide command signals for an intuitive control of advanced robotic arms with high degrees-of-freedom. The aim of the presented study is to reliably record the activity of individual sources (fascicle or synergistic fascicles) within an intact nerve using the flat interface nerve electrode (FINE). We chronically recorded the physiological activity within the sciatic nerve of dogs during normal gate, then independently recover the activity of the two main sources within the nerve at the FINE implant site, and then compared it with the two muscles outcomes controlled by these sources (Ankle joint movement). The presentation will include an overview on the FINE recording setup and the source localization algorithm, the chronological progression of FINE stability, recording quality and source recovery over 6 month period (two dogs), and demonstration of the accuracy of source recovery as a binary classifier of fascicular activity using ROC analysis.

January 23, 2015
NEC Seminar

9:00am, NORD 400
Speaker: Jingle Jiang
Advisor: Dr. Dawn Taylor
Title: Validation of a new noise reduction algorithm for multichannel neural recordings

Abstract
Accurately determining when an action potential or 'spike' occurs (detection) and then accurately attributing each spike waveform to its appropriate neuron (sorting) is essential for all neuroscience research that relies on extracellular neural recordings. However, the existence of both biological and non-biological noise makes accurate spike detection and sorting a challenge. In this talk, I will present an assessment of our new algorithm for reducing background noise in
multichannel neural recordings. The new method can be used for both online and offline spike sorting. We will provide evidence that our new noise reduction algorithm results in higher signal-to-noise ratios which lead to more spikes detected and more accurate sorting than traditional methods. Results from both simulation and real data will be presented.

January 16, 2015
Neural Prosthesis Seminar

8:00am, Kulas Auditorium
Speaker: Philip N. Sabes, PhD
UCSF Department of Physiology
UC Berkeley/UCSF Center for Neural Engineering and Prosthetics
Title: “A Learning-Based Approach to Artificial Proprioception”

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Abstract
Proprioception—the sense of the body's position in space—is important to natural movement planning and execution and will likewise be necessary for successful motor prostheses and brain–machine interfaces (BMIs). I will present our recent work on the development of a learning-based approach to delivering artificial proprioceptive feedback. This work is motivated by the theoretical observation that movement planning and control rely on information from multiple sensory modalities, and that these signals are combined in a statistically optimal and highly adaptive manner. We have shown how a simple network model can learn to perform such multisensory processing, driven only by the common statistics of its inputs, e.g., by spatiotemporal correlations between sensory modalities. When then demonstrated that the same principle can be used to train animals to use an artificial sensory signal. In particular, we paired known visual feedback with an initially unfamiliar (and non-biomimetic) multichannel intracortical microstimulation signal that provided continuous information about hand position relative to an unseen target. After learning, the animals were able to use this signal to guide naturalistic movements. Furthermore, they combined the artificial signal with vision to form an optimal estimate of hand position. These results demonstrate that a learning-based approach can be used to provide a rich artificial sensory feedback signal, suggesting a new strategy for restoring proprioception to patients using BMIs, as well as a powerful new tool for studying the adaptive mechanisms of sensory integration.

January 9,2015
NEC Seminar

9:00am, Wickenden 322
Speaker: Kabilar Gunalan
Title: Developing Tools for the Theoretical Characterization of Pathway Activation during Subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation
Advisor: Cameron McIntyre

Abstract
Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for movement disorders; however, the mechanisms of action are not well understood. Computational modeling can be used to understand the quantitative effects of stimulation on the surrounding neural tissue. We explore the steps taken to develop accurate anatomical reconstructions of known fiber tracts that are potentially modulated during therapeutic subthalamic DBS.


2014

December 19, 2014 CANCELED
NEC Seminar

9:00am, Wickenden 322
Speaker: Jingle Jiang
Advisor: Dawn Taylor

Abstract
Accurately determining when an action potential or 'spike' occurs (detection) and then accurately attributing each spike waveform to its appropriate neuron (sorting) is essential for all neuroscience research that relies on extracellular neural recordings. However, the existence of both biological and non-biological noise makes accurate spike detection and sorting a challenge. In this talk, I will present an assessment of our new algorithm for reducing background noise in multichannel neural recordings. The new method can be used for both online and offline spike sorting. We will provide evidence that our new noise reduction algorithm results in higher signal-to-noise ratios which lead to more spikes detected and more accurate sorting than traditional methods. Results from both simulation and real data will be presented.

December 12, 2014
Neural Prosthesis Seminar

8:30am, Biometrics Research Building 105
Speaker: Mario Romero-Ortega, PhD

December 12, 2014
Neurology Grand Rounds

8:00 AM – 9:00 AM, Kulas Auditorium
“Deep Brain Stimulation”
Jens Volkmann, MD, PhD
Chairman, Department of Neurology
Julius-Maximilians-University, Würzburg, Germany

December 5, 2014: NEC seminar
9:00am, Nord 400
Speaker: Julie Murphy
Title: Selective Nerve Stimulation to Delay the Onset of Muscle Fatigue
Advisors: Dr. Ron Triolo and Dr. Dustin Tyler

Abstract: Individuals with a lower cervical or thoracic level spinal cord injury can stand using functional neuromuscular stimulation. While many individuals have been able to stand long enough to perform important activities of daily living such as getting dressed or transferring from bed to a wheelchair, there is a lot of variation in the onset of muscle fatigue, which consequently affects the length of time each individual is able to stand. By selectively stimulating fascicles within a nerve, the activation of synergistic muscles can be rotated to allow muscles to rest and recover while maintaining a constant joint moment. While initial results in human participants looks promising, tuning of these advanced stimulation paradigms needs to be automated and optimized to find the stimulation parameters that will best delay the onset of muscle fatigue.

November 21, 2014
Neural Prosthesis Seminar

8:30am, Biometrics Research Building 105
Speaker: Lonnie D. Shea, PhD
Title: "Biomaterial Bridges and Delivery Systems in CNS Repair"

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Abstract: Systems and strategies for promoting tissue growth provide enabling technologies for either enhancing regeneration for diseased or injured tissues, or to investigate abnormal tissue formation such as cancer. Given the complexity inherent in tissues, my laboratory is working towards the concept of "Systems Tissue Engineering", which indicates the dual need i) to develop systems capable of presenting combinations of factors that drive tissue growth, as well as ii) to incorporate systems biology approaches that can identify the appropriate combination of factors. Biomaterial scaffolds represent a central component of many approaches and provide the enabling tools for creating an environment and/or deliver factors that can direct cellular processes toward tissue formation. We have developed scaffolds with the objective of providing factors to stimulate growth and also blocking factors that inhibit regeneration, and will illustrate this approach through our work in the area of spinal cord injury, as well as the development of nanoparticles for modulating the immune response in a model of multiple sclerosis.

October 31, 2014: NEC seminar
9:00am, Nord 400

Speaker: Jessica Nguyen
Title: A Materials Approach to Reduce Inflammation at the Neural Interface
Advisor: Dr. Capadona

Abstract: Single unit neural recordings from intracortical microelectrodes can be used to control external devices and restore volitional control for patients with motor disabilities. Unfortunately, clinical use is limited due to inconsistency in recording quality and device lifetime . Our lab focuses on modulating the characteristics of the surrounding tissue and improving the proximity of neuronal cell bodies to improve microelectrode function. Here, I will present on the effects of material compliance coupled with antioxidant delivery to reduce neuroinflammation and potentially improve microelectrode recording.

Neural Prosthesis Seminar Series 2014-2015 brochure here.

10-17-2014: NP Seminar 8:00 a.m.
Speaker: Dr. Nader Pouratian
Assistant Professor, UCLA Dept. of Neurosurgery
Location: Kulas Auditorium University Hospitals

9-19-2014: Neural Prothesis Seminar
8:30 a.m., BRB 105

Dr. Jeffrey Capadona
Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering
Case Western Reserve University
Departments of Biomedical Engineering, Neurology, and Neurosurgery
"Biologically 'Inspired' Approaches to Enable Next-Generation Intracortical Microelectrodes"

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Abstract: To ensure long-term consistent neural recordings, next-generation intracortical microelectrodes are being developed with an increased emphasis on reducing the neuro-inflammatory response. The increased emphasis stems from the improved understanding of the multifaceted role that inflammation may play in disrupting both biologic and abiologic components of the overall neural interface circuit. To combat neuro-inflammation and improve recording quality, the field is actively progressing from traditional inorganic materials towards approaches that either minimizes the microelectrode footprint or that incorporate compliant materials, bioactive molecules, conducting polymers or nanomaterials. However, the immune-privileged cortical tissue introduces an added complexity compared to other biomedical applications that remains to be fully understood. The Capadona Lab utilizes basic science techniques to provide a more complete mechanistic understanding of the molecular and biological-mediated failure modes for intracortical microelectrodes. Their increased understanding provides the framework for the development of targeted materials-based and therapeutic attempts to impact intracortical microelectrode performance. This seminar will provide an overview of the recent highlights and promising strategies to enable long-term clinical successes of intracortical microelectrodes.

9-11-2014: Neurosciences Seminar
12:10 p.m., BRB 105

Dr. Cameron McIntyre
Case Western Reserve University
Departments of Biomedical Engineering, Neurology, and Neurosurgery
"From Biophysics to Clinical Practice: Scientific Development of DBS Technology"
Host: Dr. Richard Zigmond

8-22-2014: NEC Friday Seminar Series 9:00am
Nord 400. The following presentations:

Speaker: Kelsey Aamoth
Title: Portable Stimulation System with Enhanced Memory to Record Continuous Data
Advisor: Dr. Ken Gustafson

Speaker: Santiago Guerra Nieto
Title: Interfacing FES bike for patients with implanted stimulation systems
Advisor: Dr. Ronald Triolo

Speaker: Maria Lesieutre
Title: A Hybrid Neuromechanical Ambulatory Assist System
Adviser: Dr. Ronald Triolo

Speaker: Nicholas Schindler
Title: Synthesizing PLA-PEG Nanoparticles with a Fluidic Nanoprecipitation System for Industrial Scale Up
Advisor: Dr. Erin Lavik

Speaker: Remy Niman
Title: Designing an Ankle Moment Transducer for Intraoperative Testing.
Adviser: Dr. Ronald Triolo

Speaker: Benjamin Nudelman
Title: Development of Trunk and Lower Extremity Musculoskeletal Models
Advisor: Dr. Musa Audu

Speaker: Nishant Uppal
Title: Evaluating the viability and efficacy of hemostatic nanoparticles in porcine liver injury models: interpreting and analyzing surgical data
Bench Mentor: DaShawn Hickman
PI: Dr. Erin Lavik

8-15-2014: NEC Friday Seminar 9:00am
Speaker: Emily Graczyk
Title: "Sense of proprioception resulting from peripheral nerve stimulation in limb loss subjects"
Advisor: Dustin Tyler
Location: Nord 400

Abstract: Individuals who have lost a limb can regain some motor function with the use of myoelectric prostheses. However, these prostheses cannot provide natural somatosensory feedback, and users must rely on visual and auditory cues to complete tasks. We have previously shown that stimulation through extraneural peripheral nerve cuff electrodes implanted in the upper limb can provide a sense of touch or pressure on the missing hand. I will present preliminary evidence that peripheral nerve stimulation can also elicit proprioception, or the sense of limb positioning and movement, in the missing hand of upper limb amputees. The goals of the project are to characterize the proprioceptive sensations resulting from stimulation of the median, ulnar, and radial nerves and to determine the relationship between proprioception and muscle activity. We hypothesize that the perceived joint in motion depends on the stimulation channel and that the specific movement perceived depends on the stimulation pattern and parameters. Restored proprioception, along with restored touch, may improve an amputee’s functional performance with a myoelectric prosthesis.

8-8-2014: NEC Friday Seminar 9:00am
Speaker: Chen Qiu
Title: "Propagation of Neural Activity by Endogenous Electrical Field"
Advisor: Dominique Durand
Location: Nord 400

Abstract: Recent experiments have shown that certain neural activity travels at a speed of 0.1m/s without synaptic transmission or gap junctions, and this speed is too high for ionic diffusion, suggesting that there exists another underlying governing mechanism. Field effect is known to modulate spiking patterns and firing timing, and here we tested the hypothesis that endogenous field generated by neural firing can be sufficient to induce activity propagations with computer simulations and experiment in-vitro. Simulation results showed that field effects alone could indeed mediate transverse propagation across three layers of neurons in both pathological and physiological conditions with a speed of 0.12 ~ 0.097 m/s and 0.11~ 0.035m/s, respectively, upon spiking initiation of the first layer, resulting endogenous field amplitudes of ~3-~6mV/mm. Further, the model predicted that smaller extracellular space generates higher propagation speeds, while other parameters that do not affect field amplitude have no significant influence on speed. In-vitro experiments in hippocampus (unfolded or longitudinal slice) recorded the same speed and field amplitude during events, and confirmed that changes in osmolarity (extracellular space volume) inversely influences propagation speed. Taken together, these results showed that despite its weak amplitude, the electric field effect can be solely responsible for neural activity propagation with a speed of 0.1m/s. This phenomenon could be important to explain the slow propagation of epileptic activity in the brain and is consistent with the propagation of theta waves in the cortex.

8-1-2014: NEC Friday Seminar 9:00am
Speaker: Brian Murphy
Title: "Can stereotactic depth electrodes be used to classify grasp posture and force commands for a hand neuroprosthesis?"
Advisor: Dr. Bolu Ajiboye
Location: Nord 400

Abstract: Functional electrical stimulation (FES) systems have allowed the restoration of functional grasp to paralyzed persons by utilizing residual movement as command sources. By using signals taken directly from the brain, it may be possible to control a wider range of grasps and grasp forces than these current signals allow. Much of the cortical tissue in the brain is tucked away inside of folds (sulci) and difficult to record from directly by electrodes traditionally used for brain computer interface work. Our study focuses on field potential signals recorded from stereotactic depth electrodes placed through these folds and how well they can be used to classify grasp posture and grasp force.

7-25-2014: NEC Friday Seminar 9:00am
Speaker: Frank Willett
Title: "The Cortex as an Adaptive Controller and its implications for Brain-Machine Interfaces."
Advisors: Dr. Taylor and Dr. Ajiboye
Location: Nord 400

Abstract: A brain-machine interface can restore movement to people with paralysis by artificially reconnecting cortical neurons to a computer cursor, robotic arm, or even an implanted functional electrical stimulation (FES) system. In one popular view, neurons in the motor cortex express (or "encode") a set of movement parameters (hand velocity, goal position, joint torque, etc.) by varying their firing rate as a fixed function of the movement parameters. It is then the job of the brain-machine interface to "decode" these movement parameters from the neural activity and feed them to an external device. In this talk, I take the opposing view that the motor cortical network is an adaptive controller that learns to express a control signal suited to whatever brain-machine interface is presented to it. I will discuss two pieces of work motivated by this viewpoint. In my research with Dr. Taylor, we designed a brain-machine interface to connect cortical neurons directly to muscle stimulators implanted in a paralyzed arm. This system requires the user’s brain to adapt to a novel, biomechanically complex system. In my research with Dr. Ajiboye, I developed a subject-specific model of closed-loop brain control that takes into account visual feedback delay, neural noise properties, and the user's control strategy. This model views the cortex as a controller and can be used to optimize parameters in a brain-machine interface.

7-18-2014: NEC Friday Seminar 9:00am
Speaker: Kyle Tepe
Title: "Using EMG to Modulate Trunk Stimulation during Manual Wheelchair Propulsion following Spinal Cord Injury."
Advisor: Dr. Ron Triolo
Location: Nord 400

Abstract: Paralysis of the trunk and hip musculature in persons with spinal cord injury can lead to postural instability while propelling a manual wheelchair. Manual wheelchair propulsion is known to be mechanically inefficient, and a high prevalence of shoulder pain has been reported by users. It has been shown that constant, low-level stimulation of the hip and trunk extensors can improve the mechanics of wheelchair propulsion during comfortable speed propulsion. This study seeks to examine benefits of EMG-controlled trunk stimulation modulated over the propulsion cycle to further improve propulsion technique at comfortable speeds and to expand these benefits to strenuous wheelchair tasks.

7-11-2014: There will be no NEC Friday Seminar.

Speakers for the summer will be:
07-18: Kyle Tepe
07-25: Frank Willit
08-01: Chen Qui
08-08: Brian Murphy

July 1, 2014:

Prof Erin Lavik of the Neural Engineering Center at Case Western Reserve University and her colleagues have developed super-clotting balls that can stop bleeding at many sites and improve survival. The super-clotting balls can last up to two weeks as a dry powder and can be made into a solution rapidly by just adding a salt or sugar water mixture. The research has been featured on the BBC, foxnews and Popular Mechanics.

Also see CWRU artificial platelet therapy for blast and trauma victims one step closer to human trials.

6-20-2014: NEC Friday Seminar 9:00am
Speaker: Meg Lashof-Sullivan
Title: "Hemostatic Nanoparticles for Treatment of Blast Trauma."
Advisor: Erin Lavik
Location: Nord 400

Abstract: Blast trauma accounts for 79% of combat related injuries and results in multi-organ hemorrhaging. Early treatment of bleeding is key to improving the odds of survival. Hemostatic nanoparticles administered intravenously in a mouse blast trauma model increase survival in the short term, and do not have any complications out to three weeks. Additionally, such particles can be loaded with drugs to provide treatment directly at the injury site. Treatment with hemostatic nanoparticles loaded with the steroid dexamethasone improves physiological recovery and reduces anxiety-related behavior in preliminary testing in a rat blast trauma model. These particles have the potential to enhance recovery from traumatic injuries.

6-13-2014: NEC Seminar 9:00 am
Speaker: Nicholas Couturier
Advisor: Prof. Durand
Title: Sensorty Stimulation for the Suppression of Seizures

Abstract: Low Frequency Electrical Stimulation (LFES) has proven to be effective as an alternative treatment for refractory epilepsy. However, LFES requires brain surgery and deep implantation of electrodes in the brain. We investigated whether a non-invasive implementation of this method using low frequency sensory stimulation (LFSS) could provide an effective alternative to surgical resection or electrical stimulation for temporal lobe epilepsy.

6-6-2014: NEC Seminar 9:00 am
Speaker: Natalie Cole
Advisor: Prof. Ajiboye
Title: Extracting underlying muscle coordination patterns of hand function.

Abstract: Functional Electrical Stimulation has been used to restore hand function to individuals with spinal cord injury at the C5 and C6 levels. The goal of our work is to develop a generalizable and systematic method for creating muscle coordination patterns for producing a wide variety of hand patterns. Current literature has suggested that the neuromotor system coordinates complex movements through a hierarchical system known as muscle synergies, where groups of muscles, rather than individual muscles, are controlled. Our work aims to quantify the underlying synergy patterns of muscle activation during hand manipulation tasks during activities of daily living, specifically teasing out their spatial and temporal correlations. These extracted patterns can then be used to develop improved FES hand systems.

5-30-2014: NP Seminar 9:00 am
Speaker: Evon Ereifej
Title: Improving the Neural Electrode Interface by Surface Topography Modifications
Location: Nord Hall, Room 400

Abstract: Neural electrode devices hold great promise to help people with the restoration of lost functions, however, research is lacking in the biomaterial design of a stable, long-term device. Current devices lack long term functionality, most have been found unable to record neural activity within weeks after implantation due to the development of glial scar tissue. Surface topography modifications can alter cell alignment, adhesion, proliferation, migration, and gene expression. Results presented here show alterations of the surface topography reduce the inflammatory response. Mimicking the surface topography of the native brain environment shows great promise to reduce the inflammatory response to neural electrodes, which may potentially improve signal strength and device longevity.

5-23-2014: NP Seminar 9:00 am
Speaker: Mingming Zhang
Title: The Mechanism of Neural Propagation
Location: Nord Hall, Room 400
Advisor: Prof. Durand
Abstract: With a custom-made micro-electrode array, it is feasible to investigate the neural propagation in a 2-D hippocampal tissue preparation. Previous studies in the laboratory reveal that the spontaneous neural propagation moves at a speed of about 0.1 m/s, diagonally across the entire tissue preparation. Electrical field effects could most likely explain why the neural activity propagates at such a speed. Recent analysis shows that the focus of each propagating event varies from different individual neural spiking events, but with a repeatable pattern. With Doppler Effect, we confirm that there is a moving focus in this neural propagation.

5-19-2014: Epilespy Grand Rounds 8:00 am
Speaker: Brian Litt, MD, Professor of Neurology and Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
Title: Engineering Technology to Treat Epilepsy
Location: BRB 105

5-16-2014: NP Seminar 8:00 am
Speaker: Mark Tuszynski, UCSD, Professor of Neurosciences, Director of the Center for Neural Repair
Location: Kulas Auditorium, UH

This laboratory studies anatomical, electrophysiological and functional plasticity in the intact and injured adult central nervous system. We focus in particular on the functional role of growth factors in modulating plasticity. Models studied in the lab include: 1) mechanisms of learning and memory in the intact adult brain, 2) plasticity and cell degeneration in models of aging and Alzheimer's disease, and 3) axonal plasticity and regeneration after spinal cord injury. In rodent and primate models of spinal cord injury, we examine the influences of growth factors and extracellular matrix molecules in modulating axonal responses to injury and the ability of these substances to promote axonal regeneration. In models of basal forebrain and cortical degeneration in rodents and primates, the ability of neurotrophic factors delivered by gene therapy to modulate cellular plasticity and survival. These studies are relevant to the understanding of aging and neuronal loss in Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's Disease. In the intact brain, we examine changes in neuronal structure and function that occur during normal learning, and the role of neurotrophic factors in modulating these changes.

1-17-2014: NP Seminar 8:30 am
Speaker: Michael Moffit, PhD
Title: Introduction to Boston Scientific SCS and DBS Systems: Technical Capabilities of the Systems, and What it Takes to go From Concept to Product
Location: Biomedical Research Building 105

Abstract
Boston Scientific develops and sells spinal cord stimulation systems for pain management and deep brain stimulation systems for Parkinson’s disease and dystonia. A feature of these systems that will be described is the use of independent current sources for each supported contact, and this capability enhances the opportunity to control the electric field, which may be important for fine tuning in a region of interest and for stability of the stimulation. The independent current sources enable advanced programming algorithms that will be described. Also, the process of going from concept to product is a substantial endeavor, with team members contributing in many roles, and these roles will be described.


2013

Congratulations to Frank Willet and Elizabeth Thrraikill who both won an NSF Graduate Student Fellowship. They will be working with Dr. Ajoboye, Taylor and Peckham

Congratulations to Dr. Bolu Ajiboye for winning the Srinivasa P Biomedical Engineering award.

12-13-2013: NEC Friday Seminar
Speaker: Dr. Doe Kumsa
Title: Sulfuric acid medium is a viable tool to explore the underlying principles governing the Shannon safe limit for neural tissues."
The primary aim of our project is to understand the electrochemistry of neural stimulating electrodes as charge injection is increased from safe values to unsafe values. Recognizing the fact that the same reactants and reactions are being studied whether we use either sulfuric acid or an animal will allow for the use of conductive sulfuric acid as a medium. Our use of sulfuric acid has helped us establish a protocol relevant for experiments with animal implanted electrodes.

11-22-2013: NEC Friday Seminar
Speaker: Elizabeth Heald
Title: "A new use for “paralyzed” muscles in persons with SCI"

11-8-2013: NEC Friday Seminar
Speaker: Kelsey Potter
Title: "Drinking Wine Might Just Improve the Biocompatibility of Devices Implanted into the Brain!"

11-1-2013: NEC Friday Seminar
Speaker: Daniel Tan
Title: "The 1st practical sensory restoration system in amputees"

10-18-2013: NEC Friday Seminar
Speaker: JingLe Jiang
Title: Impedance Spectroscopy: what it can and cannot tell us about intracortical microelectrode recording quality

10-11-2013: NP Seminar cancelled

10-4-2013: NEC Friday Seminar
Speaker: DaShawn Hickman
Title: "Stopping spinal cord injury before it starts"

9-20-2013: Neural Prosthesis Seminar
8:30 AM, BRB 105

Speaker: Richard M. Greenwald, PhD
Title: "Translation of Engineering Advances and Technology to Clinical Use"

9-13-2013: NEC Friday Seminar
Speaker: John Hermann
Title: "Disruption of Toll-like receptor signaling to improve cortical microelectrode integration"

9-6-2013: NEC Friday Seminar
Speaker: Brian Murphy
Title: "Grasp posture and force commands recorded from depth electrodes in the brain"

8-23-2013: NEC Friday Seminar
Speaker: Swarna Solanki
Title: "Cooperative Control: Using voluntary control to enhance upper extremity movement restoration"

8-16-2013: NEC Friday Seminar
Speaker: Frank Willit
Title: "Direct cortical control of muscle stimulators in a simulated upper-limb neuroprosthesis"

8-9-2013: NEC Friday Seminar
Speaker: Natalie Brill

8-2-2013: NEC Friday Seminar
Speaker: Max Freeberg
Title: "Chronic Response of the Cat Sciatic, Median, and Ulnar Nerves to a Compliant, Composite Flat Interface Nerve Electrode (C-FINE)"

7-26-2013: NEC Friday Seminar
Speaker: James Liao
Title: "A Closed-Loop Brain-Computer-Interface Simulation"

7-19-2013: NEC Friday Seminar CANCELLED
Speaker: Daniel Tan
Title: "Nerve Stimulation for Sensory Feedback"

7-12-2013: NEC Friday Seminar

6-28-2013: NEC Friday Seminar
Speaker: Madhu Ravikumar
Title: "Molecular Mediators of Neurodegeneration at the Electrode-Tissue Interface"

6-21-2013: NEC Friday Seminar

6-14-2013: NEC Friday Seminar
Speaker: Margaret Sullivan
Title: "Development of Temperature Stable Hemostatic Nanoparticles"
Location: Wickenden 105

6-7-2013: NEC Friday Seminar
Speaker: Rick Arlow
Title: "Theoretical principles underlying antidromic activation of axon arbors and implications in deep brain stimulation"

5-31-2013: NEC Friday Seminar
Speaker: Thomas Ladas
Title: "Seizure Reduction in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Using 1Hz Optical Stimulation."

5-24-2013: No NP Series

5-17-2013: No NP Series

5-10-2013: NEC Friday Seminar
Speaker: Manfred Franke
Title: "Applying the combined DC and HFAC waveforms to provide onset-free neural block"

4-26-2013: NEC Friday Seminar
Speaker: Tazan Dweiri
Title: "Recording Peripheral Nerve Activity with FINE: Chronic Reliability Study in canine"

4-12-2013: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 400 NORD
Speaker: Andrew Shoffstall
Title: "Synthetic platelets in small and large animal models of trauma

4-5-2013: No Friday Seminar at 9:00 a.m.

4-5-2013: Neurology Grand Rounds
8:00 a.m., Biomedical Research Building (BRB), Room 105. Reception immediately following in BRB Lobby
Title: "Fire, Fantoms, and Fugu: Sodium Channels from Squid to Clinic"
Hosts: Dr. Richard Zigmond, Dr. Robert Kirsch, and Dr. Anthony Furlan

4-4-2013: Neurosciences Seminar and The Distinguished Neural Prosthesis Lecture
12:30 p.m., Room E501, School of Medicine, Robbins Bldg./East Wing
Title: "Chasing Men on Fire: Na Channels and Neurological Disorders"

3-29-2013: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 400 NORD
Speaker: Aaron Hadley
Title: "Neural Network Detection of Swallowing from Palatometry"
Advisor: Dr. Dustin Tyler

3-22-2013: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 400 NORD
Speaker: Andrew Shoffstal
Advisor: Dr. Erin Lavik

3-15-2013: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 400 NORD
Speaker: Chris Pulliam
Advisor: Dr. Robert Kirsch

3-8-2013: NP Series
9:00 am, Room 400 NORD
Advisor: Dr. Cameron McIntyre

3-1-2013: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 400 NORD
Speaker: Kabi Bunalan
Advisor: Dr. Cameron McIntyre

2-22-2013: NP Series
8:30 am, BRB 105
Speaker:

2-15-2013: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 400 NORD
Speaker: Smruta Koppaka
Title: A self-righting closed-loop controller for seated balance after spinal cord injury using FES
Advisor: Dr. Dustin Tyler

2-8-2013: NP Series
8:30 am, BRB
Speaker: Tom Sugar

2-1-2013: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 400 NORD
Speaker: Sarah Chang
Title: Hybrid Neuroprothesis to Restore Walking After Spinal Cord Injury
Advisor: Dr. Ron Triolo

1-25-2013: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 400 NORD
Speaker: Kyle Taljan
Title: An Introduction to Diffusion Weighted MRI and Potential Applications
Advisor: Dr. Cameron McIntyre

1-11-2013:NP Series
8:30 Dr. Michael Staton-Hicks, MD
Inamori Center


2012

12-14-2012: NP Series
8:30 Krisna Kumar, MD BRB 105

12-7-2012: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 400 NORD
Speaker: Jessica Nguyen
Advisor: Dr. Jeff Capadona

11-30-2012: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 400 NORD
Speaker: Kumsa Doe

11-16-2012: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 400 NORD
Speaker: Erik Peterson
Advisor: Dr. Dustin Tyler
Title: Motor Neuron Activation in Peripheral Nerves Using Infrared Neural Stimulation

11-9-2012: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 400 NORD
Speaker: J. Thomas Mortimer
Title: Mechanisms of Stimulation Induced Tissue Damage: A Career Long Pursuit (1967 to Present)

11-2-2012: NP Series
8:30 Martha Morrell, MD Room E501 SOM

10-26-2012: BMES
9:00 am., Room 400 Wickenden

10-19-2012: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 400 NORD
Speaker: Ming Ming Zhang
Advisor: Dr. Dominique Durand

10-12-2012: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Erik Peterson
Advisor: Dr. Dustin Tyler
Title: Combining Electrical and Infrarred Neural Stimulation

10-10-2012: NP Series
7:15 am, Robbins Building School of Medicine Room E 501
Speaker: Jaimie Henderson, MD

10-5-2012: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Ming Ming Zhang
Advisor: Dr. Dominique Durand

10-4-2012: NP Series
12:10pm, Robbins Building School of Medicine Room E 501
Speaker: Dr. Roman Giger

9-28-2012: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Kyle Talian
Advisor: Dr. Cameron McIntyre

9-20-2012: NP Series
9:30 am, Wolstein 1413
Speaker: Jose M. Carmena, Ph.D.
Neural Adaptations To a Brain-Machine Interface

9-14-2012: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Kelsey Potter
Advisor: Dr. Jeff Capadona
Title: Molecular Approaches to Control Neuronal Populations Surrounding Implanted Central Nervous System Devices

9-7-2012: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Nathan Makowski
Advisor: Dr. Patrick Crago

8-31-2012: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Brian Murphy
Advisor: Dr. Bolu Ajiboye
Title: Direct Brain Control for Hand Grasp Restoration in Paralyzed Individuals

8-24-2012: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speakers: Nathan Makowski, Peter Cooman, Frank Willet, James Liao
EMBS Practice
Titles:
COOMAN: Control of a Time-Delayed 5 Degrees of Freedom Arm Model for Use in Upper Extremity Functional Electrical Stimulation.

WILLET: Compensating for Delays in Brain-Machine Interfaces by Decoding Intended Future Movement

LIAO: Predicting the initiation of minimum-jerk submovements in three-dimensional target-oriented human arm trajectories

8-17-2012: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Natalie Brill
Advisor: Dr. Dustin Tyler
Title: Optimization of High Density Nerve Cuff Stimulation

8-10-2012: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Lydia Everhart
Advisor: Dr.Erin Lavik
Title:

8-7-2012: Congratulations to Dr. Jeffrey Capadona on receipt of the 2011 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers [PECASE] more...

Electrochemical Measurement Workshop
August 6-10, 2012 See Flyer

8-3-2012: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Jingle Jiang
Advisor: Dr. Dustin Tyler
Title: Development of a Bluetooth Palatometer for Dysphagia Management

7-27-2012: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Swarna Solanki
Advisor: Dr. Robert Kirsch

7-20-2012: PRESENTATION
9:00 am, SOM E501
Speaker: Dr. Cameron McIntyre
Title: Neural Engineering Investigation of Deep Brain Stimulation [pdf]

7-20-2012: NEC Friday Seminar Cancelled

7-13-2012: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: James Liao
Advisor: Dr. Robert Kirsch
Title: Modeling Human Arm Reaching for a Closed-Looped Simulator of a BCI

7-6-2012: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Yang Wang
Advisor: Dr. Dominque Durand

6-29-2012: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Daniel Tan
Advisor: Dr. Dustin Tyler
Title: Implant for Human Sensory Stimulation

6-22-2012: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Patrick Crago
Title: Combined electrically and physiologically evoked neural activity, with application in augmenting voluntary force.

6-8-2012: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Ilya Kolb
Advisor: Dr. Dustin Tyler
Title: Interfascicilar Recording on the Rabbit Sciatic Nerve

5-25-2012: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Matthew Iorio
Advisor: Dr. Robert Kirsch

5-18-2012: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Matthew Iorio
Advisor: Dr. Robert Kirsch

5-11-2012: NP Series
BRB 105
Speaker: Angela Belcher, PhD MIT

5-4-2012: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Sheela Toprani Tang
Advisor: Dr. Dominique Durand

4-27-2012: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Madhu Ravikumar
Advisor: Dr. Jeff Capadona

4-20-2012: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Margaret Sullivan
Advisor: Dr. Erin Lavik

4-13-2012: NP Series
BRB 105
Speaker: Michael Yaszemski, M.D., Ph.D., Mayo Clinic

4-6-2012: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Rick Arlow
Advisor: Dr. Cameron McIntyre

3-30-2012: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Thomas Ladas
Advisor: Dr. Dominique Durand

3-23-2012: NP Series
BRB 105
Speaker: Ed Boyden, Ph.D., MIT

3-16-2012: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Manfred Franke
Advisor: Dr. Ken Gustafson
Title: Electrical Bladder Maintenance in Felines With Chronic-SCI Through HFAC Conduction Block of the Pudendal Nerve

3-9-2012: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Peter Cooman
Advisor: Dr. Robert Kirsch

3-2-2012: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Yazan Dweiri
Advisor: Dr. Dominique Durand

2-24-2012: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker:
Advisor:

2-17-2012: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Aaron Hadley
Advisor: Dr. Dustin Tyler

2-10-2012: NP Series
8:30 am, BRB 105
Speaker: Dr. William Durfee, University of Minnesota
Title:

2-3-2012: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Andrew Shoffstal
Advisor: Dr. Erin Lavik
Title: Synthetic Platelets to Halt Bleeding After Spinal Cord Injury

1-27-2012: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Chris Pulliam
Advisor: Dr. Robert Kirsch

1-20-2012: NP Series
8:30 am, BRB 105
Speaker: Dr. Feng Zhang, MIT
Title: Neuroengineeriing: Molecular and Optical Axis of Control


2011

12-16-2011: NP Series
9:00 am, BRB 105
Speaker: Dr. Andre Machado

12-9-2011: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Kabi Gunalan
Title: Elucidating the Fiber Paths Associated with Side Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease
Advisor: Dr. Robert Kirsch

12-2-2011: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Smruta Koppaka
Advisor: Dr. Dustin Tyler

11-18-2011: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Jaime McCoin
Title: Sensory Stimulation Reduces Spastic EUS Reflexes After Chronis SCI
Advisor: Dr. Cameron McIntyre

11-11-2011: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Jessica Nguyen
Title: Local Microglia Cell Ablation at the Cortical Tissue-Electrode Interface
Advisor: Dr. Ken Gustafson

11-4-2011: NP Series
8:30 am, NORD 310
Speaker: Dr. Marc Schieber, MD, PhD

10-28-2011: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Eric Peterston
Title: Peripheral Nerve Stimulation Using Focused Infrared Light
Advisor: Dr. Dustin Tyler

10-21-2011: NP Series
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Susan Harkema, PhD

10-7-2011: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: BMES Students

Kelsey Potter: Modulation of Neural Degeneration at the Cortical-Tissue Device Interface Through Molecular Control of the Inflammatory Response.

Madhu Ravikuman: Molecular Approaches to Study and Modulate Neurodegeneration at the Brain-Neural Prostheses Interface.

Bharath Velagapudi. : A Transgenic Study of Molecular Mediators of Neural Degeneration at the Cortical-tissue Device Interface

Smruta Koppaka: TBD

9-30-2011: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Kelsey Potter
Title: The Inflammatory Response to Intra-Cortical Electrodes: Systemic Anti-oxidants Improve Neuronal Density
Advisor: Dr. Jeff Capadona

9-23-2011: NEC Friday Seminar: CANCELLED
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Eric Peterson
Advisor: Dr. Dustin Tyler

9-16-2011: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Ming Ming Zhang
Title: Detecting the Propagation of Seizure-Like Activity in Intact Hippocampus In-Vitro
Advisor:

9-9-2011: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: NP Series. Ravi Belamkonda
Advisor: Dr. Jeff Capadona

9-2-2011: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Swarna Solanki
Advisor: Dr. Robert Kirsch

8-26-2011: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speakers: Students attending EMBS
Including: Tom Bulea, Lee Fisher, Yang Wang, David Tang, Nathan Makowski.
Posters by: Max Freeberg, Matt Schiefer

8-19-2011: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Nathan Makowski
Advisor: Dr. Patrick Crago

8-12-2011: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Natalie Brill
Title: "Optimization of Nerve Cuff Stimulation Using Genetic Algorithm Search Methods"
Advisor: Dr. Dustin Tyler

8-5-2011: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Harrison Kalodimos
Title: "Co-Adaptive Decoding of Muscle Activations From Motor Cortex"
Advisor: Dr. Dawn M. Taylor

7-29-2011: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: James Liao
Title: "Towards a Simulation of a Brain-Computer-Interface for Control of an Arm Prosthesis in Individuals with High Tetraplegia"
Advisor: Dr. Robert Kirsch

7-22-2011: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Nemath Farhan Syed Shah
Title: "Flat Interface Nerve Electrode for Tracking of Breathing"
Advisor: Dr. Dustin Tyler

7-15-2011: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Yang Wang
Advisor: Dr. Dominque Durand

7-8-2011: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Daniel Tan
Title: "Nerve Stimulation for Sensory Feedback"
Advisor: Dr. Dustin Tyler

7-1-2011: NEC Friday Seminar Cancelled

6-24-2011: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Brian Murphy
Title: "How Many Commands Are Needed To Reach A Set Of Functional, Upper Extremity Task Postures?"
Advisor: Dr. Robert Kirsch

6-22-2011: Dissertation Defense
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Tom Foutz
Title: "Energy Efficient Neural Stimulation"
Advisor: Dr. Cameron McIntyre

6-17-2011: NEC Friday Seminar Cancelled
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Kathy Ward

6-10-2011: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Christa Wheeler Moss
Title: "Investigation of Below Injury Muscles Signals for Neuroprosthetic Control"
Advisor: Dr. P. Hunter Peckham

6-3-2011: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: David Tang
Title: Bilateral Epileptic Seizure Suppression With Deep Brain Electrical Stimulations
Advisor: Dr. Dominique Durand

5-27-2011: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Matthew Iorio
Title: "An EMG and Model-Based Continuous Adaptive Controller for Upper Extremity Neuroprostheses."
Advisor: Dr. Robert Kirsch

5-13-2011: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Sheela Toprani Tang

5-6-2011: NEC Friday Seminar CANCELLED
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Matthew Iorio

4-29-2011: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Hyun Joo Park
Title: "Motion Control of Neuromuscular Skeletal Systems with a Multiple Contact Nerve Electrode"
Advisor: Dr. Dominique Durand

4-22-2011: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Donald Campbell
Title: "Improving Functional Outcomes After Blast Induced Traumatic Brain Injury"
Advisor: Dr. Erin Lavik

4-8-2011: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: James Harris
Title: "The Brain, Material Stiffness, and Tissue Response: Implications for Intracortical Microelectrode Design and Performance"
Advisor: Dustin Tyler

4-1-2011: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Thomas Ladas
Title: "Investigating Mechanisms of Seizure Control using Spatially-Targeted Optogenetic Stimulation"

3-31-2011: Ph.D. Dissertation Defense
3pm, Room 307 Wickenden
Presenter: Andrew Kibler, Ph.D. Candidate, Dept. of Biomedical Engineering
Title: EPILEPTIFORM PROPAGATION IN THE UNFOLDED HIPPOCAMPUS AND A MICROMACHINED ARRAY SYSTEM FOR IN-VITRO ANALYSIS
Advisor: Dominique Durand
Abstract

3-25-2011: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Manfred Franke
Title: HFAC BLOCK OF THE PUDENDAL NERVE VIA CHRONICALLY IMPLANTED ELECTRODES CAN IMPROVE BLADDER VOIDING IN A FELINE SCI MODEL"
Advisor: Ken Gustafson

3-4-2011: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Speaker: Kelsey Potter

2-18-2011: NEC Friday Seminar
9:00 am, Room 525 Wickenden
Speaker: Peter Cooman
Title: "Nonlinear feedback control of an upper extremity neuroprosthesis"
Advisor: Dr. Kirsch

2-04-2011: NEC Friday Seminar
9 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Presenter: Andy Cornwell
Advisors: Dr. Kirsch
Title: Control of a multidimensional arm using a simple set of commands

1-28-2011: NEC Friday Seminar
9 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Presenter: Donald Campbell
Advisors: Erin Lavik
Title: Controlling Hemorrhaging in the CNS

1-14-2011: NEC Friday Seminar
9 am, Room 105 Wickenden
Presenter: Bo Gui
Advisors: Dr. Jeff Capadona and Dr. James Basilion
Title: Real Time In Vivo Imaging of the Microelectrode-Brain Interface

 

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