In the News

Global first in mixed-reality education during COVID-19 pandemic

September 2020

Global first in mixed-reality education during COVID-19 pandemic

 

 

 

 

Newswise — CLEVELAND—The developers of Case Western Reserve University’s signature HoloAnatomy mixed-reality software for the Microsoft HoloLens knew they were likely achieving a global first this Spring when they quickly pivoted to the first-ever, all-remote anatomy course when the COVID-19 pandemic kept 185 first-year medical students from coming to campus.

 


Case Western Reserve University achieves apparent global first with mixed-reality education during ongoing COVID-19 pandemic

September 2020

Case Western Reserve

 

 

 

 

CLEVELAND — As the world pivoted to life at home amid the ongoing COVID-19 global pandemic, Case Western Reserve University's School of Medicine found an innovative way to engage their students.


Remote HoloAnatomy® Study Published in JAMA

September 2020

JAMA Network

 

 

 

 

 

JAMA, or the Journal of American Medical Association, published the study that we performed on the experience and assessment of the Remote HoloAnatomy® Software course, delivered in the spring semester of the academic year 2019-2020.


HoloAnatomy® Software Featured in EDUCAUSE Digital Review 2020

August 2020

EDUCAUSE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EDUCAUSE Review, a magazine that takes a broad look at current development and trends in technology to see how it relates to college and universities. This magazine dives into how the IT community works together with the higher education institutions to enhance their future. ‍ This issue of EDUCAUSE Review featured the HoloAnatomy® Software Suite showing that the world is adapting to changes. “This pandemic may break higher education. Yet it may also remake it, by forcing shifts that seemed unimaginable just a few months ago.” In this issues, the HoloAnatomy® Software Suite was featured as 3D learning, expressing that education doesn’t just exist at college or university as the physical sense, but also creating a digital world for students to discover and expand their knowledge. 

 


Can medical students learn anatomy without a cadaver? COVID-19 is forcing the question

professional from article in lab

 

 

 

 

 

The “first cut” in a gross anatomy class, when a student uses a scalpel to slice into the skin of a cadaver, is a nerve-wracking experience for anyone embarking on a medical career. But it’s almost sacred, too. As students begin their hands-on anatomy education, they also have to ruminate on life and death, and their relationship with their future patients.

 


Universities Get Creative With Technology Due to Coronavirus Closures

University of Washington in Seattle

 

 

 

 

 

Universities scrambled over the past month to move classes online as the coronavirus pandemic forced campus closures. With social distancing likely to extend through the spring semester, chief information officers are taking stock of their actions, identifying quick solutions that could one day become permanent fixtures on a postcrisis campus.

 


Mixed Reality: A Revolutionary Breakthrough in Teaching and Learning

July 2018

Students using HoloLens

 

 

 

 

Teaching and learning with technology, prior to this point, was mostly limited to supplementary collaboration tools for communication: learning management systems and electronic texts. The technology was simply an electronic aid to traditional didactic teaching, adding a little modern muscle to the same ways we have taught and learned for decades. We are now entering an era where technology really does the teaching, providing an entirely new mechanism for learning.

 


IC at Cleveland Clinic's "Ideas for Tomorrow" with Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella

June 2017

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella using HoloLens

 

 

 

 

The IC’s work on the HoloAnatomy® Software was featured on stage at Cleveland Clinic’s Ideas for Tomorrow lecture series with Satya Nadella and Toby Cosgrove. After a few days of preparation, the IC team was able to demonstrate a live broadcast from our own custom camera rig showing the holograms that the on-stage presenters could see. The demonstration begins at about 45 minutes into the linked video. For the record, Toby’s request to see the brain at the end was completely spontaneous. Thankfully the IC team is always prepared!

 


Sheryl Sandberg Gets a Tour 

June 2017

Sheryl Sandberg

 

 

 

 

 

Sheryl Sandberg, the COO of Facebook and founder of Leanin.org, came to Cleveland as part of Cleveland Clinic’s Ideas for Tomorrow lecture series. During this visit, she got a demo of our HoloAnatomy® Software from Erin Henninger and Kerrin Sunshine, and afterwards she posted about it!


Scientists Are Turning Your Body Into Holograms. Doctors, architects, and even elevator technicians are using artificial reality to re-design their work

June 2017

National Geographic cover

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Katie Couric Visits IC

May 2017

Katie Couric using HoloLens

 

 

 

 

Journalist Katie Couric visited Cleveland as part of her reporting series “Cities on the Rise.” As part of this story, she went on a virtual anatomy tour with Toby Cosgrove and Mark Griswold. This was an experience of an early version of the curriculum that will be used in our new Health Education Campus. Mark also got to hold her hand for a moment.

 


The Unreal, Bleeding-Edge Tech That’s Helping Doctors Make The Cut

June 2017

Faculty & Students looking at Hologram

 

 

 

 

 

I couldn’t quite decide whether it was his agonized expression or the detailed tattoos covering his arms that bewildered me the most, but the full-size dummy in a hospital gown wasn’t there to freak people out. He was there to help improve health care for U.S. veterans, part of the technology arsenal of the Veterans Health Administration’s high-tech SimLearn facility, housed in an impressive building on the outskirts of Orlando.


HoloAnatomy® Software Featured in Fortune Magazine

April 2017

Fortune Article

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fortune Magazine Editor in Chief, Cliff Leaf, visited the Cleveland Clinic to discuss new disruptions in healthcare. As part of this visit, he tested the HoloAnatomy® Software program being developed at the Interactive Commons with faculty director, Mark Griswold. Besides seeing the body in detail, Cliff said, “Seeing this demo with Dr. Cosgrove, a former heart surgeon who pioneered techniques for valve repair that are widely used to this day, was an extra treat.”


How Virtual Anatomy Will Change Med School

student using HoloLens pointing at something

 

 

 

 

 

Last week I spent a day at the venerable Cleveland Clinic—the city’s best-known celebrity, perhaps, next to this guy. The hospital (and really, it’s a hospital system with outposts in several cities in the U.S. and abroad) has always been on the spear point of progress—but that has been particularly true over the past 13 years, under the guidance of CEO Toby Cosgrove.

 


HoloAnatomy® Software App Named Finalist for International Science Media Awards

August 2016

Jackson Hole

 

 

 

 

The HoloAnatomy® demo app designed by the Interactive Commons to highlight how mixed-reality technology can transform education, is a finalist in the Jackson Hole Science Media Awards, an international competition that recognizes the best in science communications across a broad range of media. The HoloAnatomy® app has two competitors left in the “Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality” category – one is globally renowned naturalist and broadcaster Sir David Attenborough, and the other is Google. The winners will be announced in September.

 


Microsoft Wows Build With HoloLens Hologram Show. HoloLens project head Alex Kipman serves up an eye-popping showcase of Redmond's augmented reality tech.

April 2015

Student looking at heart hologram with HoloLens

 

 

 

Several years ago, Microsoft released a video called "Productivity Future Vision (2011)," which showed a business traveler navigating a city overlaid with useful information and holographic media presenting itself on any glassy, flat surface available—car windows, buildings, even credit card-sized mini-devices.