Race, Police and Protest

George Floyd died May 25, 2020, after nearly nine minutes with a Minneapolis police officer's knee on his neck.

In the days that followed, protests in Minneapolis soon spread across the country, including to Cleveland on Saturday, May 30.

What began as a peaceful march in this city later became a clash involving tear gas canisters flying and police cruisers afire. As in other cities, destruction, looting and curfews followed.

Case Western Reserve launched this page to provide communications, resources and related information to these events and their larger context.

University Statements

Join us for tomorrow's Day of Dialogue event

Wednesday, Sept. 16

To the Case Western Reserve Community:

This Thursday, Sept. 17, we come together once again for dialogue and discussion. Our university has been challenged and inspired by the demands for equity and justice on campus, in the Cleveland community and across the country. Students, staff, faculty and alumni have shared their experiences and concerns related to campus and beyond, and we are committed to addressing those issues—and, most importantly, taking action.

We invite you to continue the conversation with us tomorrow beginning at 10 a.m. Incoming Interim President Scott Cowen will open the Day of Dialogue, and Vice President Lou Stark, Vice President Robert Solomon and Office for Multicultural Affairs Director Naomi Sigg will share the work of the For a Better CWRU Student-Led Task Force. During an open dialogue session at 11 a.m., attendees will have a chance to respond and share concerns about racism, equity and action on campus.

At 1 p.m., students are invited to meet residents of the surrounding Cleveland neighborhoods and discuss community-building efforts. All are then welcome for the final session at 3 p.m., which addresses the tremendous pressures, pain and stress that individuals involved in advocacy and activism work (whether formally or through grassroots online or in-person campaigns) are facing; members of the university’s health and wellness teams will discuss the mental health resources available, and together we’ll experience an interactive “mental health break,” an opportunity to creatively connect and find a moment of peace.

Full details about each session, as well as registration instructions, can be found in The Daily.

The efforts to bring equity, inclusion and justice to our campus and our community are critical today and will be a central concern for us in the weeks, months and years ahead. We cannot do this work without each of you. Please join us tomorrow.

Sincerely,

Sustained Dialogue of CWRU Co-Chairs

Janetta Hammock
Program Manager, Office of Diversity, Inclusion and Equal Opportunity

John Killings
Associate Director of Multicultural Leadership & Programming, Office of Multicultural Affairs

Edwin Mayes
Director of First-Year Experience and Family Programs



Continue the conversation with CWRU's next Day of Dialogue

Sunday, Sept. 13

To Our Alumni and Friends,

In June, the university held a Day of Dialogue to start critical conversations related to race and justice—on campus and across America.

On Sept. 17, alumni, students, faculty, staff and friends of the university are invited to continue these conversations surrounding equity, inclusion and racism through our next Day of Dialogue.

Through this daylong event, which will be livestreamed at case.edu/livestream/s1, the university’s Sustained Dialogue Program will provide an opportunity to receive updates, share concerns about these critical issues, and learn more about the mental health support and wellness resources available through the university.

I invite you to view the full schedule online, and register to attend these important sessions.

In an email to faculty, staff and students on Sept. 7, Robert Solomon, vice president for the Office for Inclusion, Diversity and Equal Opportunity, emphasized the university’s commitment to listen “intently to our community about their lived experiences and challenges and obstacles they faced in our institution.

“Back in June we held a Day of Dialogue to start the conversation,” he wrote. “In the months since we have worked to begin to respond to the many concerns we have heard expressed. Before we even begin, however, we want to be clear that these efforts mark only the beginning of our work. Like democracy, equity, justice and equality require our continuous and perpetual attention.”

Please consider joining us to spur these important discussions—and, most importantly, action—at Case Western Reserve.

Bradford W. Crews
Associate Vice President
The Alumni Association of Case Western Reserve University



Race, Justice and Inclusive Excellence

Monday, Sept. 7

To the Case Western Reserve Community:

The death of George Floyd seemed to awaken scores of people to the systemic racism that insidiously invades every segment of our society. Although Black communities have been marching, advocating and pleading with America to wake up to the injustices routinely visited upon them and other communities of color, their cries for equity had led to few substantive changes for law enforcement.

But the images of George Floyd struggling to breathe under the knee of an unapologetic police officer sparked a new level of awareness—and outrage. This time the protests spread to cities across the country, drawing people of all races and continuing for weeks. More and more people leaned into difficult conversations about race and white supremacy. Others who had vigorously condemned Colin Kaepernick were now embracing his ideals.

Many of us believed that this newfound awareness would translate into more critical thought about police brutality, equity and justice. But then we saw a Kenosha, Wisconsin police officer shoot Jacob Blake shot in the back seven times in front of his small children. Two days later white teenager Kyle Rittenhouse came to a protest of Blake’s shooting, visibly armed with a semi-automatic weapon. He shot three people, killing two of them, and Kenosha police allowed him to simply return home to Illinois.

The next day NBA players walked out of the playoffs and refused to play. WNBA players, tennis stars and other high-profile figures have also taken various stands in protest. Now some in higher education have led a call for a ‘scholar strike’ this week, while others are holding teach-ins and searching for additional ways to give voice to our opposition to the culture of oppression, abuse and racism across this country.

Although Case Western Reserve formally embraced inclusive excellence more than a decade before the death of George Floyd, we knew we needed to join the rest of America in listening intently to our community about their lived experiences and challenges and obstacles they faced in our institution. Back in June we held a Day of Dialogue to start the conversation. In the months since we have worked to begin to respond to the many concerns we have heard expressed.

Later this week we will begin to share some of the outcomes of those conversations, and on Sept. 17 we will hold a second Day of Dialogue. Before we even begin, however, we want to be clear that these efforts mark only the beginning of our work. Like democracy, equity, justice and equality require our continuous and perpetual attention.

Rob Solomon
Vice President for Inclusion, Diversity and Equal Opportunity



Day of Observance, Friday, June 19

To Our Faculty, Staff and Students:

Your strong participation in last week’s Day of Dialogue demonstrated this community’s commitment to engage around issues of race. From implicit bias to institutional racism, health disparities to campus policing, you tackled difficult topics with urgency, empathy and an emphatic desire for meaningful change.

Tragically, national developments since Case Western Reserve’s June 10 event have only underscored the need for action. Just before midnight Friday, an Atlanta police officer shot and killed a 27-year-old Black man, Rayshard Brooks, outside a fast-food restaurant. Two days later in southern Ohio, a small local protest for Black Lives Matter drew hundreds of counter-demonstrators—some armed—spewing slurs and confronting residents.

Still, some signs of progress emerge. The states of New York and Iowa have banned police chokeholds and increased accountability for law enforcement. Atlanta’s mayor issued a series of executive orders to require de-escalation efforts and reduce officers’ use of force, while New York City’s Police Commissioner disbanded anti-crime units involving roughly 600 officers and known for aggressive force—including fatal shootings.

And, as protests and reckonings continue across the country, Confederate statues are coming down and others are starting to step up. NASCAR banned Confederate flags, the NFL acknowledged it was wrong in how it treated protesting players, and major polls show that Americans overwhelmingly believe these recent protests are justified.

Will these examples lead to more substantive advances? Will disparities in health, education, and economic opportunity narrow? And how will our university make the kinds of gains urged during last week’s discussions?

As we considered these and other related questions, we also recognized that this week includes a seminal anniversary in U.S. history, Juneteenth. On June 19, 1865, Union Army Major General Gordon Granger stood in Galveston, Texas, and issued the order declaring “all slaves are free.” As Texas was the last state in the Confederacy to fall, the date of Granger’s declaration has become a national occasion for the celebration of emancipation.

In a year unlike any other we have experienced, Juneteenth has also taken on new meaning. Companies such as Adobe, Nike, Twitter, Target, Buzzfeed and Quicken Loans have announced that the day will be a holiday, while others have said they will close early.

This year, we ask that university offices and programs close or cancel operations this Friday, June 19, for a campus-wide Day of Observance.

Our goal is to give the campus community time to reflect on the issues raised during the Day of Dialogue and nationally in recent weeks. It is an opportunity to read, listen, and learn—and consider next steps for ourselves, and our university.

As part of this observance, we will post recordings of several of the Day of Dialogue discussions on the university’s website, as well as other materials still being finalized. You will receive updates and links later this week.

We recognize that this news comes on short notice, and that some university operations must continue on Friday. In those instances, supervisors need to work with their employees to ensure coverage and/or support for necessary activities—and also ensure that those staff who do work Friday receive another paid day away from work later this month. Determinations regarding classes scheduled for Friday will rest with the instructor for each course.

For now, we thank you again for engaging in the Day of Dialogue last week, and hope your time away from work Friday will offer opportunities for education, information—and inspiration.

Barbara R. Snyder
President

Ben Vinson III
Provost



Day of Dialogue: Wednesday, June 10

Sunday, June 7

To Our Alumni:

As some of you know, we originally scheduled Case Western Reserve’s annual Day of Giving to take place Tuesday, June 9.

But in light of recent national events, proceeding as planned this week was simply not an option.

Instead, we are holding a university-wide Day of Dialogue this Wednesday, June 10, to explore the issues now gripping the nation. We also will be considering how we as a community can best engage them—within and beyond our campus.

As planning is still in its earliest stages, I cannot yet share a full schedule. What I can confirm now, however, is that Provost Ben Vinson III and I will participate in a concluding leadership panel that day at 4 p.m. EDT. Also on the panel are Vice President for Inclusion, Diversity and Equal Opportunity Robert Solomon, who started here in February after more than two decades at Ohio State, the last five as assistant vice provost for its office of diversity and inclusion, and Naomi Sigg, director of our Office of Multicultural Affairs since 2013.

Our Alumni Association will share details about the panel, as well as additional schedule updates, in the coming days.

We have included Diversity and Inclusion among our core values since the 2008 Forward Thinking strategic plan, including within it “civility and the free exchange of ideas,” “civic and international engagement,” and “appreciation for the distinct perspectives and talents of each individual.”

This week’s event is one way to honor that core value, but even more it is a commitment to do what we can as an institution to help address the roots of tragedies like George Floyd’s death. Last week, we created a website featuring campus communications and resources relating to recent events; we will continue to update it with information about the Day of Dialogue and related initiatives.

For now, though, I want to close by addressing black alumni and all alumni of color. The deaths of Mr. Floyd last month, Ahmaud Arbery in February, and, here in Cleveland, of 12-year-old Tamir Rice six years ago—and so many others—all stem in some way from systemic racism. As an institution of higher learning, Case Western Reserve has responsibility to work to eradicate it—and we will do all we can to fulfill it.

Barbara R. Snyder
President



Words, Values and Actions

Friday, June 5

To Our Faculty, Staff and Students:

Bright yellow and roughly 50 feet tall, the letters cover two city blocks just north of the White House.

Painted on 16th Street just today, they spell three words: Black Lives Matter.

Earlier this week, those same three words appeared on our Spirit Wall, stretching across its entire length in all capital letters.

In both instances, the messages are too striking to be missed. The more pressing question, though, is how long will they last?

The three words that launched a global movement first appeared on social media in July 2013, prompted by the acquittal of George Zimmerman in the fatal shooting of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin. Seven years later, scenes from across the country this week demonstrate not only pain and desperation, but also an urgent need for national engagement around race.

Next week at Case Western Reserve, we will take our own small step toward that effort. Several offices and organizations across the campus have come together for a campus-wide Day of Dialogue, Wednesday, June 10. Because planning has just begun, specifics are few. But we wanted you to be able to mark your calendars as soon as possible.

The day will include sessions offering facilitated "safe spaces" for discussion within and among groups, Q&As with specific university offices and, we hope, conversations that ultimately yield specific ideas about ways our university can help address systemic racism. We will provide additional details as soon as they are available.

In addition to announcing the Day of Dialogue, we also want to take this opportunity to reiterate Case Western Reserve’s core value of Inclusiveness and Diversity, which includes “civility and the free exchange of ideas,” “civic and international engagement,” and “appreciation for the distinct perspectives and talents of each individual.” First articulated in the university’s 2008 strategic plan Forward Thinking—and repeated in subsequent plans—these ideas are, if anything, more imperative today.

Finally, we must pause for a moment to focus on the individuals at our university most directly and deeply affected by the death of George Floyd and all of the developments that have followed: the people of color within our community and, especially now, those who are African American. You are a part of Case Western Reserve. We support you. And you absolutely, undeniably matter.

Whatever happens to the painted letters on East 16th Street or our own Spirit Wall over time, their message will continue to hold meaning on this campus. Next week, we will come together to explore how we can more effectively answer its call.

Barbara R. Snyder
President

Ben Vinson
Provost and Executive Vice President



Eric Garner, George Floyd, and Tamir Rice

Sunday, May 31

Message from President Barbara R. Snyder and Provost Ben Vinson III

To Our Faculty, Staff and Students:

Six years later, the words are the same.

I can’t breathe.

After all of the mourning and protests, the lawsuits and training, the promises made and lessons learned, nothing, it seems, has changed.

Lying on a Staten Island sidewalk in the summer of 2014, Eric Garner said “I can’t breathe” nearly a dozen times as a police officer’s arm stayed tight around his throat.

Last Monday in Minneapolis, George Floyd repeated the same phrase—in his case, with an officer’s knee pressing into his neck.

The local protests that followed have spread across the country, reaching Cleveland on Saturday. Ours opened peacefully, but devolved soon after marchers reached the Justice Center a few blocks away. Protesters pitched water bottles and spray-painted walls, officers released tear gas canisters, and before long, police cars were engulfed in flames.

Today protests continued in communities nationwide—and even extended to London and Berlin. In Cleveland, meanwhile, officials announced a noon curfew for downtown to allow time for clean-up of streets and stores.

But what about the systemic racism cited so often in recent days? How can a city, a country, “clean up” that?

We cannot—should not—ever try to wipe away the past.

We need to know it. Own it. And commit to forging a better future.

Four months after Eric Garner died in 2014, Tamir Rice was shot and killed by police while playing with a toy gun outside a Cleveland recreation center.

He was 12 years old.

The following year, the city accepted a 110-page settlement agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice. The document required sweeping reforms to address the department’s record of excessive force and urgent need to restore community trust.

The monitoring team’s most recent report, issued in September, found force incidents fell by nearly a third compared to 2017.

That team, including deputy monitor Ayesha Bell Hardaway of our law school, still found shortcomings, in particular in terms of resources for training and data systems. Nevertheless, the group concluded the department had made “substantial progress.”

While the medical examiner ruled Garner’s death a homicide, the officer who choked him never faced charges. Nor did the one who killed Tamir. On Friday, Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was arrested and charged with third-degree murder. He appears in court tomorrow.

Small steps, true. But in a moment of so much anger… and pain… and sorrow, they matter.

In the often-quoted words of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. “…the arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice.”

As an institution of higher learning, we have a profound responsibility to the future. When it comes to this moment, how can we best begin to fulfill it?

This week, we will provide opportunities to engage, and share resources for those who would like support. Tonight, though, we want to remind you of a part of our legacy: The first Commencement address Frederick Douglass ever gave came at Western Reserve College in 1854.

“The relation subsisting between the white and black people of this country is the vital question of the age,” he told some 3,000 in attendance. “In the solution of this question, the scholars of America will have to take an important… part.”

Barbara R. Snyder

President

Ben Vinson III

Provost and Executive Vice President



School, Department and Organization Statements

Statement on Entrenched Racism and a Call to Peaceful Social Justice and Action

Read the statement from the Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences on its website.


University Health & Counseling Services Statement and Support Spaces

Read the statement on the University Health & Counseling Services website.


Solidarity with Black Members of the CWRU Community

Undergraduate Student Government, June 1

To the students of Case Western Reserve University,

On May 25th, the soul of our nation was yet again painfully wounded by the unjust taking of the life of George Floyd in Minneapolis, Minnesota. This murder, which occurred at the hands of men who were charged to protect Mr. Floyd, is one of many instances of police brutality. This event provides yet another example of the struggle of the black community, a struggle which has manifested itself from Minneapolis to New York to Cleveland, where the taking of Tamir Rice’s life shook our own local community. We are reminded of the reality that racism is not a distant problem, but rather an enemy that can find its way into any heart. It is our work to engage in the due diligence necessary to ensure that we do not become complacent with the racism that seems to surround us. We have a responsibility to our peers to fight against racial injustice in both ourselves and others.

At CWRU, we know the importance of affirming one another, standing together against injustice, and supporting each other in every aspect of life. Racism is antithetical to everything we represent as a community, and we will not stand by silently or idly as we are again reminded of its painful presence. It is exactly at times such as these that we must reaffirm our resolve to stand in solidarity with those in greatest pain. In these moments, unity within our community is most critical. It is for this reason that we write to you all today: to show that we understand the present situation, are dedicated to action, and wish you to join us in the pursuit of justice.

To students, staff, and friends in the black community, we unequivocally recognize that your lives matter, and we stand with you in solidarity. We as a CWRU community recognize this unfathomable pain and seek ways to support those of us most impacted by the tragedy of prejudice. We also recognize that during these difficult times it may be necessary that some of us, particularly members of the black community, may need to remove ourselves from the stressors of CWRU activity or to refrain from dialogue, at least for a time. We know that the burden of action should not fall solely upon those of us in the black community but should also be shouldered by allies dedicated to improving our collective future. To those most impacted: We see you. We support you. We stand with you. We will fight with you.

For those who are not part of the black community, our role in advancing anti-racism is crucial to support our friends and colleagues. We must see the protests for what they represent, and resist the temptation to judge them by the few that riot and loot in their cities. We must maintain our focus on the source of the pain: the lives lost and endangered. In these times, it is important to educate ourselves, to reflect on the ways which we may improve, and to partner with those seeking to be the positive change that we all wish to see. We must look upon our own racial attitudes, asking ourselves where we can improve and how we can confront discrimination within our own communities. Taking a stand against racism is not a passive process. As we grow, let us find the grace to encourage one another in our efforts and to have understanding and patience with those of us who may have more to learn. Let us explore the myriad of ways we are able to be involved. To start this journey, we have attached a list of some resources. If you are moved to and capable of protesting, please remember to maintain your own safety. We have included links with some suggestions in the aforementioned list of resources.

We also must reflect on those ways we have fallen short as a community to combat racism. We are called to ensure that we are safe both on and off campus. However, we must take care that our proper concern for safety does not morph into a skepticism of the people who reside in CWRU's surrounding communities. They deserve our utmost respect. The stereotypes, such as the infamous warning not to “go beyond the bridge,” are reminders of where we have fallen short. Empty chairs at events sponsored by groups representing communities of color await us, and the hosts of these events are excited to welcome everyone to share in their heritage. We must ensure that we extend a warm hand of welcome to individuals of diverse backgrounds, careful not to excuse the shortcomings of both support for and representation of communities of color. We invite our faculty, staff, and administrators to engage with us regarding these issues and to have an open dialogue about racism and privilege within our campus and curriculum. We implore our administration to communicate with us more openly when they enact changes with regard to policing and security so that we may provide feedback on the policies which affect our collegiate home, informed by what we see in our world. Most importantly, we need to realize that as our University grows, so does our obligation to preserve the vibrant culture and life of the city that we share.

We, as a community, have the power to create a future of hope. Let us no longer fail to listen to the voices of those crying out to be heard. Let us be moved by their voices to grow in service and love for our fellow human beings. Let us challenge ourselves to combat prejudice where we see it, even if that is uncomfortable. And once we have been heard, let us challenge ourselves to model the kindness, mercy, forgiveness, love, unity, tolerance, and understanding that we wish the rest of the world would exude as well.

For unity today and tomorrow,

CWRU’s
African American Society, afroamexec@case.edu
African Students Association, asaexec2020-2021@googlegroups.com
Black Student Union, bsucwru@case.edu
Interfraternity Congress, ifc-phcexec@case.edu
National Society of Black Engineers, president.nsbe.cwru@gmail.com
Panhellenic Council, ifc-phcexec@case.edu
Residence Hall Association, case-rha@case.edu
Undergraduate Diversity Collaborative, udc-exec@case.edu
University Media Board, umb-exec@case.edu
University Program Board, upb-exec@case.edu
Undergraduate Student Government, usg-executive@case.edu
Zeta Chapter, Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc., zetachapter1922@gmail.com



Campus Response to Police Brutality

Black Student Union, June 1

To the students of Case Western Reserve University,

On May 25th, the soul of our nation was yet again painfully wounded by the unjust taking of the life of George Floyd in Minneapolis, Minnesota. This murder, which occurred at the hands of men who were charged to protect Mr. Floyd, is one of many instances of police brutality. This event provides yet another example of the struggle of the black community, a struggle which has manifested itself from Minneapolis to New York to Cleveland, where the taking of Tamir Rice’s life shook our own local community. We are reminded of the reality that racism is not a distant problem, but rather an enemy that can find its way into any heart. It is our work to engage in the due diligence necessary to ensure that we do not become complacent with the racism that seems to surround us. We have a responsibility to our peers to fight against racial injustice in both ourselves and others.

At CWRU, we know the importance of affirming one another, standing together against injustice, and supporting each other in every aspect of life. Racism is antithetical to everything we represent as a community, and we will not stand by silently or idly as we are again reminded of its painful presence. It is exactly at times such as these that we must reaffirm our resolve to stand in solidarity with those in greatest pain. In these moments, unity within our community is most critical. It is for this reason that we write to you all today: to show that we understand the present situation, are dedicated to action, and wish you to join us in the pursuit of justice.

To students, staff, and friends in the black community, we unequivocally recognize that your lives matter, and we stand with you in solidarity. We as a CWRU community recognize this unfathomable pain and seek ways to support those of us most impacted by the tragedy of prejudice. We also recognize that during these difficult times it may be necessary that some of us, particularly members of the black community, may need to remove ourselves from the stressors of CWRU activity or to refrain from dialogue, at least for a time. We know that the burden of action should not fall solely upon those of us in the black community but should also be shouldered by allies dedicated to improving our collective future. To those most impacted: We see you. We support you. We stand with you. We will fight with you.

For those who are not part of the black community, our role in advancing anti-racism is crucial to support our friends and colleagues. We must see the protests for what they represent, and resist the temptation to judge them by the few that riot and loot in their cities. We must maintain our focus on the source of the pain: the lives lost and endangered. In these times, it is important to educate ourselves, to reflect on the ways which we may improve, and to partner with those seeking to be the positive change that we all wish to see. We must look upon our own racial attitudes, asking ourselves where we can improve and how we can confront discrimination within our own communities. Taking a stand against racism is not a passive process. As we grow, let us find the grace to encourage one another in our efforts and to have understanding and patience with those of us who may have more to learn. Let us explore the myriad of ways we are able to be involved. To start this journey, we have attached a list of some resources below. If you are moved to and capable of protesting, please remember to maintain your own safety. We have included a link with some suggestions in the aforementioned list of resources.

We also must reflect on those ways we have fallen short as a community to combat racism. We are called to ensure that we are safe both on and off campus. However, we must take care that our proper concern for safety does not morph into a skepticism of the people who reside in CWRU's surrounding communities. They deserve our utmost respect. The stereotypes, such as the infamous warning not to “go beyond the bridge,” are reminders of where we have fallen short. Empty chairs at events sponsored by groups representing communities of color await us, and the hosts of these events are excited to welcome everyone to share in their heritage. We must ensure that we extend a warm hand of welcome to individuals of diverse backgrounds, careful not to excuse the shortcomings of both support for and representation of communities of color. We invite our faculty, staff, and administrators to engage with us regarding these issues and to have an open dialogue about racism and privilege within our campus and curriculum. We implore our administration to communicate with us more openly when they enact changes with regard to policing and security so that we may provide feedback on the policies which affect our collegiate home, informed by what we see in our world. Most importantly, we need to realize that as our University grows, so does our obligation to preserve the vibrant culture and life of the city that we share.

We, as a community, have the power to create a future of hope. Let us no longer fail to listen to the voices of those crying out to be heard. Let us be moved by their voices to grow in service and love for our fellow human beings. Let us challenge ourselves to combat prejudice where we see it, even if that is uncomfortable. And once we have been heard, let us challenge ourselves to model the kindness, mercy, forgiveness, love, unity, tolerance, and understanding that we wish the rest of the world would exude as well.

For unity today and tomorrow,

CWRU’s
African American Society, afroamexec@case.edu
Black Student Union, bsucwru@case.edu
Residence Hall Association, case-rha@case.edu
Undergraduate Diversity Collaborative, udc-exec@case.edu
University Media Board, umb-exec@case.edu
Undergraduate Student Government, usg-executive@case.edu
Zeta Chapter, Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc., zetachapter1922@gmail.com



A Message from the VP for Student Affairs

Read Vice President Lou Stark's statement on the Student Affairs website.


Schubert Center Issues Statement in Response to Protests

Read the statement from the Schubert Center for Child Studies on the center's website.


Statement of School of Law Co-Deans Berg and Scharf on justice and reform in the aftermath of the killing of George Floyd

Read a statement from the co-deans on the School of Law's website.


Inamori International Center for Ethics and Excellence Statement

Inamori Center, June 3

The Inamori International Center for Ethics and Excellence stands with the Black Lives Matter movement and against racism. The United States has a long, ugly history of racial injustice, and while some progress has been made – every step the result of hard-fought struggles — there have also been awful steps backward, seemingly unending sacrifices, and far too many unanswered crimes committed against people of color. Pain and anger are fully justified in response.

Multitudes have been denied basic rights, freedom, opportunity, safety, dignity, and even their lives, as George Floyd was. In their memory and for every generation to come, we must keep demanding justice. There is no past perfect America to restore. There is only the hope for a better future. Those with the most privilege have the greatest obligation to be actively anti-racist and work to dismantle systemic racism forever.



Begun Center Statement of Solidarity and Support for Racial Justice

Begun Center for Violence Prevention Research and Education, June 4

The Begun Center for Violence Prevention Research and Education stands in solidarity with those protesting racism in all its forms and supports the recent efforts in the city of Cleveland to declare racism a public health crisis.

We grieve for George Floyd and countless others who have had their lives taken by individuals motivated by, and systems so deeply rooted in, prejudice and racism. For far too long, agencies and organizations responsible for educating, caring for, and protecting its citizens have played active or passive roles in the historic and continued mistreatment of Black bodies. We observe racial disparities and their associated mental, physical, economical, and emotional consequences in so many of the areas in which we work.

We will continue to use our largely privileged voices to amplify these inconvenient but indefensible truths while simultaneously helping these same systems to do better. Injustice blooms in the shadows, and our responsibility is to shine spotlights on areas to which history, indifference, and complacency provide convenient and deadly cover.

We will continually educate ourselves, our partners, and our communities about the many ways structural and systemic racism is woven in the fabric of our nation.

We will continually examine the ways in which our own work falls short of our goals and use those lessons to become better advocates and allies.

Silence and inaction are not options.

Black lives matter.



A Statement from the CWRU Department of Physical Education & Athletics

Read the full statement on the athletics website.


Statement on behalf of GCAS

Graduate Council of Arts and Sciences, June 5

We stand together with protesters for racial justice.

We stand in solidarity with all those who are raising their voices against racial injustice and crying out for change. In these fraught times the words of W. E. B. Du Bois eloquently frames the spirit of our thoughts:

“I believe that all men, black, brown, and white, are brothers.”

“How shall Integrity face Oppression? What shall Honesty do in the face of Deception, Decency in the face of Insult, Self-Defense before Blows? How shall Desert and Accomplishment meet Despising, Detraction, and Lies? What shall Virtue do to meet Brute Force? There are so many answers and so contradictory; and such differences for those on the one hand who meet questions similar to this once a year or once a decade, and those who face them hourly and daily.”

“Either America will destroy ignorance or ignorance will destroy the United States”

As students looking toward a better future, we hope to play our part in making change happen in a nation wracked with fear, anger, pain and division and fight forces of bigotry and historical prejudice.

In unity…
The Executive Board of GCAS on behalf of the Students of the College of Arts and Sciences, CWRU



#BlackLivesMatter

Department of Astronomy, June 8

Read the full statement on the astronomy department website.


Statement on Black Lives Matter, Protest, and Policing: Things We Can Do Now.

Department of Political Science, June 9

Read the full statement on the political science department website.


A Statement from GSC

Graduate Student Council, June 9

Case Western [Reserve]’s Graduate Student Council (GSC) holds solidarity with Black students and community members as we continue to witness senseless killings of Black people at the hands of the police. Every day, we watch as violent acts are perpetually engineered towards the Black population in physical, mental, spiritual, and emotional forms, and we are angered.

The consequences of the enslavement of Black people are embedded and evident in the policies and practices in the United States and beyond. The global oppression of Blacks can no longer be endured.

With this in mind, we will not remain silent and compliant to the systematic racism inherent within academic spaces and throughout society-at-large. The long-awaited time for action is now!

As a graduate student community, GSC is providing resources for graduate students of color and White allies to eradicate anti-Blackness and racism, and promote racial equity.

We are committed to long term anti-racism advocacy and will begin holding panel discussions on race and social justice in the coming weeks.

In addition, we are providing a list of resources that advocate for and support communities and students of color at the following link: GSC List of Social Justice Resources

If you have any questions or need additional resources, feel free to reach out to us. We are here to support you.

Sincerely,

Case Western Reserve University Graduate Student Council Executive Board



A Statement from Student Activities & Leadership

In light of the recent deaths of Mr. George Floyd, Mr. Ahmaud Arbery, and Ms. Breonna Taylor, the Office of Student Activities & Leadership would like to reiterate that we are committed to creating a community of inclusivity and diversity, and we stand in solidarity with our Black students, faculty, staff, and community members against these horrific acts. We unequivocally condemn acts of violence, hatred, and racism.

We recognize the platform we have and would like to use it now to amplify a list of resources written and compiled by representatives from the Black Student Union, African American Society, Undergraduate Diversity Collaborative, and Undergraduate Student Government as well as stand by Sunday's message from President Snyder and Provost Vinson.

Here are a list of awesome resources:



The Feminist Collective at CWRU

Watching the deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Tony McDade, and other black men and women has been heartbreaking. As an organization that stands by individuals seeking for the equality of all genders in our society, we cannot stand by as our brothers and sisters are brutally and unfairly killed and discriminated against. The black lives matter movement is powerful because it is driven by an urgent need for equality and the fair treatment of people of color.

Communities of color have faced years of severe oppression and the unnecessary loss of countless lives. We, as the Feminist Collective absolutely refuse to stand by as individuals that are integral parts of our community live in fear of death. Including individuals identifying as LGBTQ+ who are more vulnerable to violence. We refuse to accept the racism and violence that exists in the institutions built to protect us.

Because without justice, ‘We can’t breathe’.


Dhamakapella

Dhamakapella stands in solidarity with our Black brothers and sisters in our continued fight against racial injustice and prejudice. For years, Dhamakapella has prided our team's diversity, but we must do better. We must do more to combat decades of systematic racism in our country. As part of the South Asian community, among others, Dhamakapella is committed to educating ourselves on biases and privilege, engaging in sustained dialogue on the topic of racial equality, and taking action in Cleveland, as well as across the country, for years to come. We must not remain idle when unity thrives through action. We encourage you all to take action with us.

MOVING FORWARD: Dhamakapella will initiate a discussion on race and equality at the beginning of each school year to create a sustained dialogue for each iteration of our team. Inappropriate, discriminatory behavior will be cause for removal.

STARTING NOW: Dhamakapella is FUNDRAISING for BLACK LIVES MATTER CLEVELAND to assist our local community. Please consider helping us contribute to BLM Cleveland's mission by donating to our Venmo, @Dhamakapella, or checking out our team member's bingo posts on Instagram. Together, we can make a difference.


Alpha Chi Omega

To our community,

The sisters of Alpha Chi Omega at Case Western Reserve University are here to speak up against racial injustices and advocate for change that our nation desperately needs. It is our duty to recognize privilege and use our platform to speak out against racism and discrimination.

We stand in solidarity with the Black community and advocate for the Black Lives Matter Movement.

We also acknowledge that greek life was historically created as segregated institutions. Our chapter wants to educate and learn more about this history to gain more perspective on how we can be better equipped to fight against racial injustices. We are committed to using this platform to continue to share resources, raise awareness, and support organizations.

We are a community of Real Strong Women and we encourage our members to be agents of change to promote diversity, equity, and inclusion.

Educate:

Donate:

Action:

  • Text FLOYD to 55156
  • Text JUSTICE to 668366
  • Text ENOUGH 55156


Case Undergraduate Indian Student Association

We are heartbroken to hear about the loss of George Floyd and innumerable Black lives lost at the hands of the policing system. We stand side by side with the Black community and want to reiterate that Black Lives Matter. We encourage you to do the same, and not be bystanders in this fight. At this time, it is important to educate ourselves about the racial injustices occurring, spread awareness, and use our privileges as a power to help influence and create systematic change.

As a South Asians, our heritage stems from our ancestors who were handpicked to immigrate by this country to pursue higher education or career advancements in this land of opportunities. The racial issues we have faced is incomparable to the centuries of enslavement and oppression the Black communities have suffered. It is our duty to do our part by calling out any unfair comparisons and emphasize the change that we need to work towards.

Please see the link in our bio for a document with links on how to actively contribute to this movement. During this time, reflect on your past actions and act towards change. Showing support is more than just a post— have tough conversations with your friends, sign petitions, donate to this cause and most importantly educate yourself on the severity of this issue. uISA will also be accepting donations through Venmo (@Sriram-Satyavolu-1) until Sunday, June 7th. All proceeds will be donated to the George Floyd Memorial Fund and the Black Visions Collective.

'Silence becomes cowardice when occasion demands speaking out the whole truth and acting accordingly.' - Mahatma Gandhi


La Alianza

To the Case Western Reserve University Community:

La Alianza is a Latinx student organization that serves the Cleveland community, celebrates the Latinx culture, and supports Latinx/Hispanic identifying students at Case Western Reserve University (CWRU). As an organization, we pride ourselves on diversity and welcoming members from other ethnic communities to, together, learn about the Latinx/Hispanic community and uplift the voices of the unheard. And yet, La Alianza has failed to address the anti-blackness that plagues our community and culture, and those of our allies. Combating anti-blackness is a continual process that we must never stop within ourselves and among our peers. Educating and holding anti-Black family members and friends accountable may be difficult, but it is absolutely necessary.

To begin this process, we have compiled a mini-educational document on what the Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement is, why it matters, and how to address anti-blackness. To be clear, this is not an all-encompassing account of everything the Black community has endured as a result of systematic oppression in America, nor is this a complete historical account of the movement. This is simply a start to understand the movement, and only a fraction of the information available. We encourage all of our members to continue their own research and commit to combating anti-blackness in themselves and in their peers.

Similarly, here you will find a drive which contains documents on how to be a non-optical/anti-racist ally, how to address racism at home and with friends (with Spanish translation provided), and mental health resources specific to the Black community and racial trauma. In addition, members will have full access to a library of compiled texts written by Black/African-American authors. We implore our members to take full advantage of the drive and all of its resources.

La Alianza recognizes that we have been silent on this matter in past years and that we have failed our Black Latinx members and Black partners. We fully recognize the cultural and historical influence the Black community has had on the Latinx experience and story.

We commit to initiating and maintaining conversations and support in order to address the needs of our Black peers. We stand in solidarity with the Black community and the Black Lives Matter Movement, and commit to dismantling anti-blackness in our community, and among our friends, families, and peers.

With hope,
La Alianza Executive Board, 2020-21


Delta Sigma Phi

Delta Sigma Phi was founded on the fundamental principles of equality, inclusion, and harmony among all people. As the Iota Iota chapter of Delta Sigma Phi we have a responsibility to uphold the core ideals that our fraternity was founded upon over a hundred years ago. We recognize the racial and institutional injustices that are present in America and even around the world. Just as our early brothers fought against racial, and religious injustice we will do the same. We hear you and we stand with you as a chapter as a fraternity.


Faculty Senate

Created by the Faculty Senate Committee for Minority Affairs; endorsed by the Faculty Senate Executive Committee

The Faculty Senate believes that diversity, inclusion and equity are sacred values for our campus. We recognize the years of systemic racism, discrimination, and injustice that have been experienced by black and brown individuals and we call on all faculty, staff, and students to stand with us to affect change on our campus and in our communities. This change begins with all of us working together to recognize our own implicit biases and the systemic discrimination that leads to inequality for Black, Indigenous, and other People of Color (BIPOC). We must stand up for equality when we see discriminatory practices. Let us join together to end institutional discriminatory practices on our campus and in our communities.

Specific actions that can be taken by faculty, staff, and students are:


Day of Dialogue

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