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MOORE, DAN TYLER, JR.

MOORE, DAN TYLER, JR.

MOORE, DAN TYLER, Jr.(1 Feb. 1908-11 Feb. 1998) drafted the Ohio Securities Act, served as a spy during WORLD WAR II, and was a prominent lecturer and writer. Moore was born in Washington D.C., where his father, Dan Tyler Moore Sr., served as a military attachi to President Theodore Roosevelt. Roosevelt offered to have Moore delivered in the White House but agreed to be his godfather when Moore's mother turned down the idea. Mr. Moore attended St. Alban's school in Washington and Salisbury School in Connecticut. He earned a degree in physics from Yale University in 1932. Following his graduation, Moore worked for a Roosevelt family brokerage in New York City. On the recommendation of Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas, he went to work for the Security and Exchange Commission under Joseph P. Kennedy. In 1937, Moore took over Ohio's securities division and wrote the state's securities act. He later ran Cleveland's regional offices of the SEC and Civil Defense.

During WORLD WAR II, General William Joseph Donavan brought him to Washington as a civilian major in the new Office of Strategic Services, the forerunner of the Central Intelligence Agency. Moore hammered out a treaty between Donavan and his arch rival, J. Edgar Hoover in which the OSS won the eastern hemisphere and the FBI to the western. Moore went to Cairo to hold two jobs: an overt one as assistant to the Middle East's economic minister and a covert one as chief of the region's counter intelligence. He helped stop Germany's supply of diamonds, foiled an assassination attempt on the life of King George of Greece and invented a hoist to airlift spies. After the war, he built hotels in Turkey and launched a trade firm with former Cleveland Safety Director ELIOT NESS as one of his partners.

Mr. Moore settled in Cleveland in 1950 and entered into the profession of public speaking. He worked his way up to $20,000 per speech on the public speaking circuit. He also wrote a syndicated column on frauds and published short stories and several best-selling books. In the 1960s, Moore became the chairman of the International Platform Association, through which he handled top political leaders and celebrities. Moving the organization's headquarters to his Cleveland Heights home, he increased the membership of the speakers trade organization from a few hundred to more than 10,000. Members of the organization included such figures as Richard Nixon, Henry Kissinger, Art Linkletter, Bob Hope, G. Gordon Liddy, and CARL B. STOKES. Moore was also a member of the Tavern Club, Union Club, Rowfant Club, and First Unitarian Church of Cleveland.

Following his graduation from Yale, Moore married Elizabeth Oakes, a Cleveland based sculptress and steamship heiress in 1932. They had four children: Luvean Owens, Elizabeth Thornton, Harriet Ballard, and Dan T. III. Moore died in his home in Cleveland Heights and is buried in LAKE VIEW CEMETERY.