Core Courses

Anatomical Sciences Core Courses

The core curriculum of the MS in Applied Anatomy program includes four courses that represent 17 credit hours: gross anatomy, histology, neuroanatomy, and embryology. Students typically take these courses over three semesters. A student must earn an A or B grade in each of these courses to be eligible for the MS in Applied Anatomy degree. The MS degree at CWRU requires 30 total credit hours; students in the MS in Applied Anatomy program may choose from a variety of electives to fulfill the additional 13 credits required. Below is a typical schedule for a student beginning the program in the fall. Students can also start in the spring, in which case gross anatomy is the first course taken, followed by histology and embryology the following fall.

Recommended Program of Study

First Year
Semester Course Code Course Name Credit
Fall

ANAT 412 

ANAT 491

Histology and Ultrastructure

Embryology 

4

3

Spring ANAT 411 Gross Anatomy 6
Summer - Elective(s) 1-6
Second Year
Semester Course Code Course Name Credit
Fall

ANAT 414

-

Neurological Anatomy

Elective(s)

4

1-6

Spring

-

-

Comprehensive Examination

Elective(s)

-

1-3

This in-depth, cadaver dissection-based, course covers all aspects of human gross anatomy. The course is modeled after a traditional medical school gross anatomy curriculum and taught by the CWRU School of Medicine, Department of Anatomy faculty. It is divided into three sections: thorax and abdomen; pelvis/perineum and limbs/back; and head and neck. One hour of lecture will precede 3 hours of dissection laboratory Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. Lectures and dissection labs will cover all human anatomy, and students should be prepared to devote more time that the scheduled hours of 1:00 to 5:00pm. Dissection labs are open 24 hours 7 days a week. Recommended preparation: B.A./B.S., or fourth year undergraduate science major.

Comprehensive functional histology course integrating microscopic identification ('structure plus nomenclature') of normal cells, tissues, and organs with aspects of their cell biology, biochemistry, and physiology ('function'). Topical coverage includes complete ('head-to-toe') tissue and organ survey with human emphasis.

This course employs a variety of teaching-learning methods--among them lectures, small-group discussions, hands-on "construction" of pathways, and brain dissection. Regional morphology will be studied via examination of the preserved brain and of sections through the CNS; functional systems will be "followed" through the spinal cord, brain stem and/or forebrain.

A detailed description of development will be presented, focusing mainly on the developing human. Discussions and presentations will also include several developing systems that have served as useful models in experimental embryology for deciphering mechanisms responsible for producing adult metazoan organisms.