Myrna Loy Patton Corley Writing Award

The Myrna Loy Patton Corley Critical Thinking and Writing Award was established by the East Cleveland City Schools and Case Western Reserve University to recognize the critical thinking and writing ability of outstanding Provost Scholars. The Award will be given to Scholars who successfully submit a final essay and meet all of the essay competition's requirements.

To be eligible for an award, a Provost Scholar must meet the following essay requirements: 

Electronically submit a typed 800-1,000 word essay (Times New Roman, 12 pt. type, 1” margins). A cover page with the Scholar’s (1) full name, (2) date of essay submission, (3) grade level, (4) school name, (5) book title, and (6) question option must be included. The essay may be submitted using this online form or via email to Kate Klonowski kak121@case.edu no later than Monday, March 9, 2020 at 5:00 p.m.

Eighth and ninth grade Scholars will answer one of the following essay questions based on the following book: 

Saedi, Sara. 2019. Americanized: rebel without a green card.

Question Option 1: In what ways does Sara’s story help you deconstruct preconceived notions about Iran and the Middle East? What about stereotypes of parents from outside North America? Use at least three specific examples from the book to construct your argument.

Question Option 2: How does Sara’s narrative challenge myths you might hear about immigrant families? How does her experience differ from the narratives that anti-immigrant groups spin in the media? Use at least three specific examples from the book as well as additional outside sources to construct your argument.

Question Option 3: Consider how Sara talks about her family and what they mean to her. How does her family experience differ from yours? Use at least three specific examples from the book to construct your argument.

Tenth through twelfth grade Scholars will answer one of the following essay questions based on the following book:

Vargas, Jose. 2018. Dear America: Notes of an Undocumented Citizen. HarperCollins Publishers.

Question Option 1: Throughout the book, what are some examples of the privileges Jose has that might give him an advantage over other undocumented immigrants? How would you characterize Jose’s feelings about the help he receives? Discuss three examples of this from the book and offer your own arguments about the role privilege plays in (i.e. upward mobility, social status, or suffering consequences) from personal observation or experience.

Question Option 2: Near the end of the book, Jose talks about what he calls the “citizenship of participation” (195). For him, the phrase means, “Citizenship is showing up. Citizenship is using your voice while making sure you hear other people around you. Citizenship is how you live your life” (195-96). In what ways is Jose’s definition changing what we typically associate with citizenship? Are these alternatives more positive or negative than the word’s usual connotations? 

Timeline:

Thursday, December 12th: Book distribution during Provost Scholars Winter Celebration at CWRU

Tuesday, January 21st: First day back! Essay outline due (review with mentor or tutor)

Tuesday, February 4th: Essay Rough Draft Due

Monday, March 9th: Final Essay Due by 5:00pm

Submissions will be evaluated by a faculty or staff person at East Cleveland City Schools and Case Western Reserve University. 

Essay Requirements for 8th & 9th Grades

Essay Requirements for 10th,11th & 12th Grades