Jewish Studies

Instructor(s):
Noah Bickart
Mondays, August 26-September 23 (no class Sept. 2)|6-8 p.m.

In this season of repentance, join Noah Bickart to explore how Rabbinic literature deals with the process, procedure and principles of repentance. We will see that the sages of the Talmud and its commentaries grappled with surprisingly contemporary questions like: How does one ask one’s fellow human being for forgiveness?

Instructor(s):
Anthony Wexler
Wednesdays, September 04 - 25|6:30 - 8 p.m.

Storytelling has been an integral part of Jewish life, from the tales that make up the Hebrew Bible to those about contemporary Jewish experiences. This class will examine how Jews have used the story to organize and understand the world and their place within it.

Instructor(s):
Eric Kisch
Wednesdays, September 11-October 23 (no class Oct 9)|1-3 p.m.

In life, Lenny Bernstein was larger than life: conductor, composer, teacher, social activist, celebrity, and family man (albeit troubled by personal demons and doubts). Now that celebrations marking his 100th birthday have ended, what of his legacy remains?

Instructor(s):
Joel Chazin
Fridays, September 13-October 4|10:30-11:30 a.m.

This course draws on Gershom Scholem’s dazzling and groundbreaking work, Major Trends in Jewish Mysticism, to explain the deep influence that mystical thinking had on shaping some of Jewish liturgy’s key prayers. Study with Rabbi Joel Chazin, who served as chaplain and director of religious services at Montefiore.

Instructor(s):
Mondays, October 28-November 25|6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

Genesis: The cosmos are created, and first families are formed. Alanna Cooper, Director, Jewish Studies at CWRU-Siegal | Exodus: Through unlikely miracles, Egypt's slaves claim self-determination. Brian Amkraut, Executive Director, CWRU-Siegal | Leviticus: An exploration of the mysterious rites and rituals of temple life.

Instructor(s):
Donna Rumenik
Mondays, October 28-November 18 (please note date change)|1-3 p.m.

Early research on the Holocaust largely overlooked the role of gender in determining how Jewish women survived or perished. The same omission was true in the study of how ordinary German women experienced and participated in the Holocaust.

Instructor(s):
Mondays, October 28-November 25|10 a.m.-noon

Genesis: The cosmos are created, and first families are formed. Alanna Cooper, Director, Jewish Studies at CWRU-Siegal | Exodus: Through unlikely miracles, Egypt's slaves claim self-determination. Brian Amkraut, Executive Director, CWRU-Siegal | Leviticus: An exploration of the mysterious rites and rituals of temple life.

Instructor(s):
Brian Amkraut
Tuesdays, October 29-November 19|7-8:30 p.m.

While Jewish life in America has been, by most measures, a great success story, the so-called New World nevertheless has offered its share of difficulties. From the earliest days or organized Jewish settlement in the Americas to the challenges of the 21st century, Jews have confronted variations on the theme of an age-old hatred.

Instructor(s):
Mondays, December 9-January 27 (no class Dec 23, Dec 30, Jan 20)|10 a.m.-noon

Joshua: The Israelites' heroic new leader ushers them into the Land. Jeremy Bruce, Principal, Stark High School at Fuchs Mizrachi | Judges: Powerful arbiters and warriors guide the people in times of war and peace.

Instructor(s):
Mondays, December 9-January 27 (no class Dec 23, Dec 30, Jan 20)|6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

Joshua: The Israelites' heroic new leader ushers them into the Land. Jeremy Bruce, Principal, Stark High School at Fuchs Mizrachi | Judges: Powerful arbiters and warriors guide the people in times of war and peace.

Instructor(s):
Mondays, February 3-March 16 (no class Feb 17, Mar 9)|10 a.m.-noon

Isaiah: Prophesizes exile and redemption for the ten tribes of the northern kingdom. Noah Bickart, Visiting Assistant Professor, John Carroll University. | Jeremiah: Rebukes his people for depravity and idolatry, and issues warnings of their destruction.

Instructor(s):
Mondays, February 3-March 16 (no class Feb 17, Mar 9)|6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

Isaiah: Prophesizes exile and redemption for the ten tribes of the northern kingdom. Noah Bickart, Visiting Assistant Professor, John Carroll University. | Jeremiah: Rebukes his people for depravity and idolatry, and issues warnings of their destruction.

Instructor(s):
Mondays, March 23-April 27 (no class April 13)|6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

Song of Songs: sensuous poetry, which captures the many dimensions of love. Amalia Haas, Rabbinic Candidate, Yeshivat Maharat | Ruth: a story of friendship and loyalty, which humanizes the needs of vulnerable outsiders. Dahna Baskin, Instructor, CWRU-Siegal | Lamentations: a mournful elegy of human fragility and loss.

Instructor(s):
Mondays, March 23-April 27 (no class April 13)|10 a.m.-noon

Song of Songs: sensuous poetry, which captures the many dimensions of love. Amalia Haas, Rabbinic Candidate, Yeshivat Maharat | Ruth: a story of friendship and loyalty, which humanizes the needs of vulnerable outsiders. Dahna Baskin, Instructor, CWRU-Siegal | Lamentations: a mournful elegy of human fragility and loss.

Instructor(s):
Mondays, May 4-June 15 (no class May 25)|10 a.m.-noon

Psalms: among the Bible's most well-known verses, these 150 poems put words to feelings of thanksgiving, joy, and lament. Eddie Sukol, Rabbi, The Shul | Proverbs: wit and wisdom in the form of one-line advice to the young and old.

Instructor(s):
Mondays, May 4-June 15 (no class May 25)|6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

Psalms: among the Bible's most well-known verses, these 150 poems put words to feelings of thanksgiving, joy, and lament. Eddie Sukol, Rabbi, The Shul | Proverbs: wit and wisdom in the form of one-line advice to the young and old.