Courses

Instructor(s):
James Godfrey
Mondays, November 25-December 16|1-2:30 p.m.

The Opium Wars (1839-1860) between the Chinese Empire and Great Britain were fought as a result of what amounted to a state sanctioned illicit narcotics trade.

Instructor(s):
Mondays, December 09-January 27 (no class Dec 23, Dec 30, Jan 20)|10 a.m.-noon

Joshua: The Israelites' heroic new leader ushers them into the Land. Jeremy Bruce, Principal, Stark High School at Fuchs Mizrachi | Judges: Powerful arbiters and warriors guide the people in times of war and peace.

Instructor(s):
Mondays, December 9-January 27 (no class Dec 23, Dec 30, Jan 20)|6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

Joshua: The Israelites' heroic new leader ushers them into the Land. Jeremy Bruce, Principal, Stark High School at Fuchs Mizrachi | Judges: Powerful arbiters and warriors guide the people in times of war and peace.

Instructor(s):
Holly Litwin
Thursdays, December 12-January 23|6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

Beginner Classical Hebrew exposes students to the sights and sounds of the original Hebrew letters as they appear in the Bible. Students will have multiple opportunities to absorb the content using various activities, games, and manipulatives.

BOOKS:

Instructor(s):
Barbara Parr
Wednesdays, January 8 - 29, 2020|7-8:30 p.m.

During this four-week course led by Barbara Parr, an instructor with Case Western Reserve University’s Laura and Alvin Siegal Lifelong Learning Program, participants will read Circe by Madeline Miller alongside selections from the The Odyssey by Homer, translated by Emily Wilson.

Instructor(s):
Allison Monroe
Wednesdays, January 8-29|1:30-3:30 p.m.
Instructor(s):
Darlene Montonaro
Wednesdays, January 8-29 |10 a.m. - noon

Showing up to write isn’t half the battle – it is the battle. This class will help you develop writing habits that will boost your confidence, help you find your "voice," and keep your writing process in motion.

Instructor(s):
Joe Konen
Thursdays, January 9-March 5|10 - 11:30 a.m.

The story of the gene is one of the great mystery narratives of science. In this book, Pulitzer Prize-winning author, Siddhartha Mukherjee, weaves together the history of genetics with his family’s history of mental illness.

Instructor(s):
Matt Weinkam
Thursdays, January 9-30 |10 a.m. - noon

Have a story to share? Looking to hone your prose? This four-week workshop is designed to help you get started on a short piece of fiction. Together we’ll practice each stage of the writing process from writing prompts to revision. Fiction of any form, length, or genre is welcome. No experience necessary. 

Instructor(s):
Pat Moore
Sundays, January 12-March 1 |5-6:30 p.m.

In this course, we will review the foundations of US citizenship and discuss how our founders expected us, the American people, to properly fulfill our citizenship role.

Instructor(s):
Paula Kalamaras
Mondays, January 13-March 2|1-2:30 p.m.

This course will study the works of Jane Austen which are known to be funny, insightful, and immortal. Books: Pride and Prejudice, Persuasion, and Northanger Abbey, Jane Austen

Instructor(s):
Pamela Belknap
Mondays, January 13-March 2 |10 - 11:30 a.m.

Doris Kearns Goodwin’s book is a fascinating study of the leadership styles of four U.S. Presidents: Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin D. Roosevelt , and Lyndon B. Johnson. Learn how each overcame personal challenges and rose to lead the nation at times of crisis in unique ways. Supplemental materials will be provided.

Instructor(s):
Pat Moore
Tuesdays, January 14-March 3 |1-2:30 p.m.

In this course, we will review the foundations of US citizenship and discuss how our founders expected us, the American people, to properly fulfill our citizenship role.

Instructor(s):
Barbara Greenberg
Tuesdays, January 21-March 10|10 - 11:30 a.m.

This course will examine how Wil Haygood’s book reveals Lyndon B. Johnson’s masterful political talent in getting Thurgood Marshall appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Book: Showdown, Wil Haygood

Instructor(s):
Ted Smith
Tuesdays, January 14-March 3|1-2:30 p.m.

Dietrich Bonhoeffer was a German theologian who came of age between the two World Wars. His writings reflect increasing alarm as he watched his fellow Germans believe the lies of the National Socialists. The book documents his ultimate decision to participate in the plot to assassinate Hitler. What message does it hold today?

Instructor(s):
Jim Lane
Thursdays, January 16 – March 5|10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

With regard to Western civilization, all roads do indeed lead to Rome. Mary Beard, the esteemed classicist at Cambridge University, takes us on a journey to the heart and soul of Rome, from its inception in 753 BC, through its Republican phase, and into its Imperial age -- nearly a thousand year span of triumph and tragedy, success and strife.

Instructor(s):
Cara Byrne
Thursdays, January 16–February 13|10 - 11:30 a.m.

What should you be reading to your children or grand-children? Each year in late January, a small group of librarians announces the most distinguished American picture books for children. Notable past winners include Where the Wild Things Are, The Snowy Day, and The Polar Express.

Instructor(s):
Ted Smith
Thursdays, January 16-March 5 |10:30 a.m. - noon

This course examines a unique historical perspective centering on a mineral, a rock, a seasoning. Prevalent today thanks to modern geology, salt was one of the world’s most sought-after commodities. A substance so valuable it served as currency, influenced trade routes and establishment of cities.

Instructor(s):
Pamela Belknap
Fridays, January 17-March 6 |10 - 11:30 a.m.

Doris Kearns Goodwin’s book is a fascinating study of the leadership styles of four U.S. Presidents: Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin D. Roosevelt , and Lyndon B. Johnson. Learn how each overcame personal challenges and rose to lead the nation at times of crisis in unique ways. Supplemental materials will be provided.

Instructor(s):
Earl Leiken
Fridays, January 17-March 6 |10:30 a.m. - noon

This course will begin with a review of basic economic concepts and then apply this foundation to a discussion of the economic challenges facing the nation. Starting with a discussion of the views of major economic thinkers, we will then discuss concepts that are critical to an understanding of basic economics.

Instructor(s):
Terry Meehan
Mondays, January 20-March 9 |10:30 a.m. - noon

E.M. Forster’s Howard’s End and Kazuo Ishiguro’s Remains of the Day are considered two of the twentieth century’s finest British novels by two of Britain’s most celebrated writers.

Instructor(s):
Linda Tuthill
Wednesdays, January 22 - March 4|1:00- 3:00 p.m.

Instructor(s):
Barbara Greenberg
Wednesdays, January 22-March 11|10:30 a.m. - noon

Every civilization deals with the health and welfare of the community. Reproductive rights are just one part of that large issue.

Instructor(s):
Linda Tuthill
Thursdays, January 23 - March 5|1-3 p.m.

Instructor(s):
Professional Staff
Tuesdays, January 28-March 3|1-2 p.m.

Instructor(s):
Professional Staff
Thursdays, January 30 - March 5 |1-2 p.m.

Instructor(s):
Mondays, February 3-March 16 (no class Feb 17, Mar 9)|10 a.m.-noon

Isaiah: Prophesizes exile and redemption for the ten tribes of the northern kingdom. Noah Bickart, Visiting Assistant Professor, John Carroll University. | Jeremiah: Rebukes his people for depravity and idolatry, and issues warnings of their destruction.

Instructor(s):
Mondays, February 3-March 16 (no class Feb 17, Mar 9)|6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

Isaiah: Prophesizes exile and redemption for the ten tribes of the northern kingdom. Noah Bickart, Visiting Assistant Professor, John Carroll University. | Jeremiah: Rebukes his people for depravity and idolatry, and issues warnings of their destruction.

Instructor(s):
Leah Cooper
Mondays, February 3 - April 27|10 a.m.-noon

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language as well as enjoy Hebrew literature, songs, drama and film, read Israeli newspapers and view Israeli television. No class April 13. 

Instructor(s):
Rivka Taub
Tuesdays, February 4 - May 5|10 a.m. - noon

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language as well as enjoy Hebrew Literature, songs, drama and film, read Israeli newspapers and view Israeli television.

No Class 3/10; 4/14

Instructor(s):
Leah Cooper
Tuesdays, February 4 - April 28|6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language as well as enjoy Hebrew Literature, songs, drama and film, read Israeli newspapers and view Israeli television. No class April 14.

Instructor(s):
Peter Haas
Tuesdays, February 4-March 3|1:30-3:30 p.m.

In Greco-Roman times, Judeans were already considered outsiders and were often mocked or depicted in derogatory terms. Although this was true of many conquered people, in the case of Jewry that attitude was taken up in the Early Church and was turned into a theological category.

Instructor(s):
Judith Shamir
Tuesdays, February 4 - May 5|10 a.m.-noon

Hebrew literature engages advanced students in fictional novels and plays by leading Israeli authors and playwrights.

Instructor(s):
Andrew Roth
Wednesdays, February 5-March 4|1:30-3:30 p.m.

Is there such a thing as "the American Story" or are there many American stories? If so, what are they?  How do they combine to create the American narrative binding us together as a nation and as a people? More fundamentally, in these fractious times why is how we answer these questions important?

Instructor(s):
Rivka Taub
Wednesdays, February 5 - May 6|1-3 p.m.

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language as well as enjoy Hebrew Literature, songs, drama and film, read Israeli newspapers and view Israeli television. No Class April 8, April 15

Instructor(s):
Rivka Taub
Thursdays, February 06 - May 07 |6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language as well as enjoy Hebrew Literature, songs, drama and film, read Israeli newspapers and view Israeli television. No class April 9, April 16.

Instructor(s):
Matt Weinkam
Thursdays, February 6-27|1-3 p.m.

Are you writing a novel? Short stories? Flash fiction? It’s all welcome in this four-week workshop designed to help strengthen, deepen, and enrich your fiction, no matter the form or genre. Writers should be prepared to submit one piece of fiction in advance of the first workshop.

Instructor(s):
Judith Shamir
Thursdays, February 6 - May 7|10 a.m.-noon

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language as well as enjoy Hebrew Literature, songs, drama and film, read Israeli newspapers and view Israeli television. No Class April 9 and April 16.

Instructor(s):
Holly Litwin
Thursdays, February 6 - May 7 |6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

Beginner Classical Hebrew exposes students to the sights and sounds of the original Hebrew letters as they appear in the Bible. Students will have multiple opportunities to absorb the content using various activities, games, and manipulatives. Books: Hebrew Primer Lois Rothblum, Bella Bergman and Ora Band.

Instructor(s):
Dario Gasparini
Thursdays, February 6-March 5|1:30-3:30 p.m.

Iconic historic examples of buildings, bridges, and tunnels will be discussed from the context of structural materials, engineering concepts, and construction processes. These perspectives provide a deeper understanding and appreciation for our built infrastructure and for the work of builders and structural engineers.

Instructor(s):
Leah Cooper
Thursdays, February 06 - May 07 |10 a.m.-noon

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language as well as enjoy Hebrew Literature, songs, drama and film, read Israeli newspapers and view Israeli television.  (No class 4/9; 4/16)

Instructor(s):
Michael Wells; Thom Yantek
Fridays, February 7-March 13|10:30 a.m. - noon

It’s hard to go wrong with good material, and the Latin poet Virgil didn’t miss his chance.

Instructor(s):
Joanne Podis
Mondays, March 2-23|1-3 p.m.

During the past two decades, there has been an explosion of interest in Jane Austen, resulting in films, TV shows, Internet videos, and more.

Instructor(s):
Darlene Montonaro
Wednesdays, March 4-25|10 a.m. - noon

Showing up to write isn’t half the battle – it is the battle. This class will help you develop writing habits that will boost your confidence, help you find your "voice," and keep your writing process in motion.

Instructor(s):
Peter Haas
Tuesdays, March 10-31|1-3 p.m.

This course explores anti-Semitism’s historical, political and social roots through an examination of the major publications that addressed the issue, including The Jews and Their Lies by Martin Luther, Protocols of the Elders of ZionThe Passing of the Great Race by Madison Grant, and The International Jew by Henry

Instructor(s):
Mary Holmes
Tuesdays, March 10-April 28 |10 a.m. - noon

This course investigates the most common controversies around food and the Western diet today. Case Studies illuminate the issues and help participants develop informed decisions.

Instructor(s):
Matt Goldish
Mondays, March 16-April 6 |6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

This course examines the great works that laid the foundations of Jewish mystical thinking and practice. We will learn about the historical context in which they were written, and will study selections of the works themselves, including Merkavah literature, Sefer Yetzirah, Sefer ha-Bahir, the Zohar, and others.

Instructor(s):
Barbara Green
Tuesdays, March 17-April 21|1:30-3:30 p.m.

When the countries of central and eastern Europe emerged from Soviet control, it was thought that Poland and Hungary were two of the three countries (Czechoslovakia being the third) with the best chance to emerge as fully functioning liberal democratic states. They had a deserved reputation for democratic progress.

Instructor(s):
John Grabowski
Wednesdays, March 18-April 22|1:30-3:30 p.m.

Before the advent of fast, reliable air transport, “the only way to cross” an ocean was by ship.   This course will examine travel by ship from the seventeenth century to the present.   It is a story of immigration, travel adventures, disaster, design, and of an industry that transformed the world.

Instructor(s):
Jeffrey Ullom
Thursdays, March 19-April 23|1:30-3:30 p.m.

American theater has an inferiority complex, but is it deserved?  In this course, we’ll look at the founding of theater in the United States and how it was used to reflect American society with all of its trials and tribulations.  Furthermore, we will study how artists began to find their own voice and create a distinct form of theater that is “

Instructor(s):
Mondays, March 23-April 27 (no class April 13)|10 a.m.-noon

Song of Songs: sensuous poetry, which captures the many dimensions of love. Amalia Haas, Rabbinic Candidate, Yeshivat Maharat | Ruth: a story of friendship and loyalty, which humanizes the needs of vulnerable outsiders. Dahna Baskin, Instructor, CWRU-Siegal | Lamentations: a mournful elegy of human fragility and loss.

Instructor(s):
Mondays, March 23-April 27 (no class April 13)|6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

Song of Songs: sensuous poetry, which captures the many dimensions of love. Amalia Haas, Rabbinic Candidate, Yeshivat Maharat | Ruth: a story of friendship and loyalty, which humanizes the needs of vulnerable outsiders. Dahna Baskin, Instructor, CWRU-Siegal | Lamentations: a mournful elegy of human fragility and loss.

Instructor(s):
Daniel Melnick
Mondays, April 6-May 11|1-3 p.m.

Virginia Woolf achieved breakthroughs both in feminist thinking and in the “stream of consciousness” psychological novel. We’ll explore how these breakthroughs are shaped by her own psychological history, her path-breaking explorations of women’s lives, and the intellectual ferment of the Bloomsbury movement (which included the economist J. M.

Instructor(s):
Brian Amkraut
Tuesdays, April 21-May 12 |1-2:30 p.m.

This course focuses on a number of unique legal cases from the late 19th and early 20th century. Not only was the Jewishness of the defendants directly related to the course of the legal proceedings, but each of these cases attracted tremendous publicity, even at the international level.

Instructor(s):
Larry Josefovitz
Thursdays, April 23-May 14|1-3 p.m.

In 1933, thousands of Jewish musicians in Berlin suddenly found themselves unemployed. At this time, Jews were also forbidden to attend concerts. In response, Dr. Kurt Singer negotiated with the new Nazi government to allow for a theater where Jews would perform for Jews.

Instructor(s):
Brian Amkraut
Tuesdays, April 28-May 26|7-9 p.m.

The advent of modernity brought with it new opportunities for Jews—both as individuals and as communities—to reassess what it means to be Jewish. This course charts the path that led from a generally uniform understanding of Judaism that prevailed in the middle ages, to the very diverse forms of Jewish expression and identity popular today.

Instructor(s):
Ravenel Richardson
Fridays, May 1–22|10 a.m. - noon

Renata Laqueur’s diary of her internment in Bergen-Belsen and Elena Skrjabina’s diary of the Siege of Leningrad provide intimate views of women’s experiences during the Second World War and the Holocaust.

Instructor(s):
Timothy O. Matson
Fridays, May 1-June 5|6:30-9 a.m.

Explore the bluebird trail, watch busy bobolinks and other migrating birds and be rewarded with an appreciation of an important part of the natural world. In May and June, migrants arrive and some continue their journeys northward.

Instructor(s):
Mondays, May 4-June 15 (no class May 25)|10 a.m.-noon

Psalms: among the Bible's most well-known verses, these 150 poems put words to feelings of thanksgiving, joy, and lament. Eddie Sukol, Rabbi, The Shul | Proverbs: wit and wisdom in the form of one-line advice to the young and old.

Instructor(s):
Mondays, May 4-June 15 (no class May 25)|6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

Psalms: among the Bible's most well-known verses, these 150 poems put words to feelings of thanksgiving, joy, and lament. Eddie Sukol, Rabbi, The Shul | Proverbs: wit and wisdom in the form of one-line advice to the young and old.

Instructor(s):
Peggy Wertheim
Tuesdays, May 5-26|1-4 p.m.

Discover, create, and explore the exciting techniques of batik and silk painting inspired by the natural beauty of Squire Valleevue Farm. Students will learn gutta and wax resist application, color blending, and paint and salt techniques. Projects include silk scarves and/or silk wall art. Design ideas, reference books, and handouts provided.

Instructor(s):
Jo Bruce
Tuesdays, May 5-26|6:30-8 p.m.

Terse and often mysterious, the stories of the Bible contain gaps and unanswered questions. Why did Lot’s wife turn into a pillar of salt? What did Cain say to Abel in the moments before murdering him? How did Abraham discover God? Trying to make sense of these puzzles, sages of the Rabbinic period recorded details to flesh out the texts.

Instructor(s):
Barbara Parr
Wednesdays, May 6-27|7-8:30 p.m.

The Immortal Irishman: The Irish Revolutionary Who Became an American Hero by Timothy Egan explores the Irish-American story of Thomas Meagher. Please read the first six chapters for the first class.

Instructor(s):
Jay Abercrombie
Wednesdays, June 3–17 |10 a.m. - noon

This field study looks at the plants, wildlife, and geology of Squire Valleevue Farm. No strenuous hiking will be involved, but participants should be able to maintain an active pace over generally moderate but occasionally hilly or wet terrain.

Instructor(s):
Pat Sigmier
Fridays, June 5-26|10 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Enjoy the experience of painting outdoors at the CWRU’s scenic Squire Valleevue and Valley Ridge Farms. The instructor uses watercolor, however any medium is acceptable. The group meets each session at a predetermined location on the farm, paints for 2–3 hours, and then gathers for a bag lunch and viewing of the paintings.