Courses

Instructor(s):
Judith Shamir
Tuesdays, September 03-December 17, 2019 (no class Oct 1, 8, 15, 22)|10 a.m.-noon

Hebrew literature engages advanced students in fictional novels and plays by leading Israeli authors and playwrights.

Instructor(s):
Leah Cooper
Tuesdays, September 03-December 17, 2019 (no class Oct 1, 8, 15, 22)|6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language as well as enjoy Hebrew literature, songs, drama and film, read Israeli newspapers and view Israeli television.

Instructor(s):
Rivka Taub
Tuesdays, September 03-December 17, 2019 (no class Oct 1, 8, 15, 22)|10 a.m.-noon

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language as well as enjoy Hebrew literature, songs, drama and film, read Israeli newspapers and view Israeli television.

Instructor(s):
Ken Ledford
Tuesdays, September 03-November 12|1:30-3:30 p.m.

The treaties signed at the Paris Peace Conference in 1919 changed everything about Europe and ushered in a twenty-year interlude of promise and tumult. Victors and defeated alike suffered loss, of complacency, of confidence, of certainty.Innovation abounded, in technology, in borders, in gender relations, in class relations, and in cultural expr

Instructor(s):
Rivka Taub
Wednesdays, September 04-December 04 (no class Oct 9, Nov 27)|1-3 p.m.

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language as well as enjoy Hebrew literature, songs, drama and film, read Israeli newspapers and view Israeli television.

Instructor(s):
Earl Leiken, Former Mayor of Shaker Heights
Wednesdays, September 04-November 13|1:30-3:30 p.m.

The American Local Community: Its Role and Its Challenges

Instructor(s):
David Hammack, Hiram C. Haydn Professor of History Emeritus, CWRU
Thursdays, September 05-November 14|1:30-3:30 p.m.

American Giving: The History of Philanthropy in the United States

Instructor(s):
Rivka Taub
Thursdays, September 05-November 21|6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language as well as enjoy Hebrew literature, songs, drama and film, read Israeli newspapers and view Israeli television.

Instructor(s):
Leah Cooper
Thursdays, September 05-November 21|10 a.m.-noon

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language as well as enjoy Hebrew Literature, songs, drama and film, read Israeli newspapers and view Israeli television.

Instructor(s):
Judith Shamir
Thursdays, September 05-November 21|10 a.m.-noon

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language as well as enjoy Hebrew literature, songs, drama and film, read Israeli newspapers and view Israeli television.

Instructor(s):
Leah Cooper
Mondays, September 09-December 16, 2019 (Sept. 30, Oct. 14, and Oct. 21)|6:30-8:30 p.m.

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language as well as enjoy Hebrew literature, songs, drama and film, read Israeli newspapers and view Israeli television.

Instructor(s):
Eric Kisch
Wednesdays, September 11-October 23 (no class Oct 9)|1-3 p.m.

In life, Lenny Bernstein was larger than life: conductor, composer, teacher, social activist, celebrity, and family man (albeit troubled by personal demons and doubts). Now that celebrations marking his 100th birthday have ended, what of his legacy remains?

Instructor(s):
Holly Litwin
Thursdays, September 12-December 15|6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

Over the course of our studies students will be exposed to the sights and sounds of the original Hebrew letters appearing in the Bible. Students will have multiple opportunities to absorb the content using various activities, games and manipulatives.

Instructor(s):
Karen Laurence
Fridays, September 13-November 8|10 - 11:30 a.m.

This course offers a guided reading of Homer’s great epic poem, The Iliad. Participants will have the opportunity to engage in analysis and discussion of various aspects of the poem, including style, historical context, and the poem’s significance within the literary canon.

Instructor(s):
Jim Lane
Mondays, September 16-November 4|10 - 11:30 a.m.

Explore the life and historical setting of the man whose very name is synonymous with creativity, curiosity and inventive genius.

Instructor(s):
Barbara Greenberg
Mondays, September 16-November 11 (no class Sept 30)|10:30 a.m. - noon

Every civilization deals with the health and welfare of the community.  Reproductive rights are just one part of that large issue.

Instructor(s):
Barbara Greenberg
Mondays, September 16-November 11 (no class Sept 30)|1:30-3 p.m.

In Our Defense by Caroline Kennedy and Ellen Alderman is a primer about the Bill of Rights. Each chapter focuses on one of the first ten amendments of the United States Constitution, using an actual case to study the issues surrounding that amendment.

Instructor(s):
Cheryl Wires
Mondays, September 16-November 4|2-3:30 p.m.

Wilkie Collins created the very first detective to appear in a novel-length mystery, Sergeant Cuff in The Moonstone (1868).  Cuff is called to an English country house to investigate the disappearance of a sacred diamond.  Charles Dickens began a rival tale with the Mystery of Edwin Drood (1870).

Instructor(s):
Joen Konen
Tuesdays, September 17-November 5|10 - 11:30 a.m.

The story of the gene is one of the great mystery narratives of science.  In this book, Pulitzer Prize-winning author, Siddhartha Mukherjee, weaves together the history of genetics with his family’s history of mental illness.

Instructor(s):
Betty Zak
Tuesdays, September 17-November 5|1-2:30 p.m.

Delve into the reality and psyche of the brave women who tempted both fate and the ire of King Henry VIII for the title of Queen. Read how history has painted Henry and the Queens; then view them thru 21st century eyes. Did some “fail” in the end because they wanted more than the Tudor life? Were they trying to break out of a mold?

Instructor(s):
Linda Tuthill
Tuesdays, September 17-November 5 (no class Oct 8)|1-3 p.m.

Creative nonfiction covers a wide range of possibilities from memoir to sports or travel writing. Come share a slice of your life or passion for a pursuit you care about.

Instructor(s):
Terry Meehan
Tuesdays, September 17-November 5|7:30-9:30 p.m.

Several hundred men and women in the entertainment industry were blacklisted during the 1940s and 1950s in one of the saddest and most complex episodes of America’s cultural history. How and why did it start? Victor Navasky has interviewed hundreds of participants on both sides of the issue and has captured the painful history of the period.

Instructor(s):
Phyllis Asnien
Tuesdays, September 17-November 5|1-2:30 p.m.

An insightful memoir seen from the author’s inevitable modulation through time.  Oates is a sensitive time traveler; for her, memory serves a transcendental function.

Instructor(s):
Pamela Belknap
Wednesdays, September 18-November 13 (no class Oct 9)|10:30 a.m. - noon

Instructor(s):
Linda Tuthill
Wednesdays, September 18-November 6 (no class Oct 9)|1-3 p.m.

Creative nonfiction covers a wide range of possibilities from memoir to sports or travel writing. Come share a slice of your life or passion for a pursuit you care about.

Instructor(s):
Terry Meehan
Thursdays, September 19-November 14 (no class Oct 10)|10:30 a.m. - noon

Two of Britain’s most celebrated writers are E.M. Forster (1879-1970) and Kazuo Ishiguro (born 1954). Both Forster’s Howard’s End and Ishiguro’s Remains of the Day are considered two of twentieth century’s finest British novels.

Instructor(s):
Charlene Mileti
Thursdays, September 19-November 7|1:30-3 p.m.

Miletus: situated on the Aegean coast of the Ionian world in Asia Minor, the city is credited with being the birthplace of western science and philosophy.

Instructor(s):
Pat Moore
Thursdays, September 19-November 7|10 - 11:30 a.m.

July,1914: One hundred years of European peace, ancient empires ruled, unbridled progress - and all shattered by war on an industrial scale.  World War I changed the world forever.

Instructor(s):
Jim Lane
Thursdays, September 19-November 7|10 - 11:30 a.m.

Explore the life and historical setting of the man whose very name is synonymous with creativity, curiosity and inventive genius.

Instructor(s):
Ted Smith
Thursdays, September 19-November 7|10 - 11:30 a.m.

A unique historical perspective centering on a mineral, a rock, a spice. Prevalent today thanks to modern geology, salt was one of the world’s most sought-after commodities. A substance so valuable it served as currency, influenced trade routes and establishment of cities. Provoked and financed wars, secured empires, inspired revolutions.

Instructor(s):
Linda Tuthill
Thursdays, September 19-November 7 (no class Oct 10)|1-3 p.m.

The poet Steven Leveni claims, The saddest part of being human is not paying attention. Presence is the gift of life. Writing poetry helps focus our attention, and together we learn how to see.

Bring 12-15 copies of a poem you have written to the first class.

Instructor(s):
Pamela Belknap
Thursdays, September 19-November 7|10:30 a.m. - noon

Doris Kearns Goodwin’s book is a fascinating study of the leadership styles of four U.S. Presidents:Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Lyndon B. Johnson.  Learn how each overcame personal challenges and rose to lead the nation at times of crisis in unique ways.

Instructor(s):
Pat Moore
Fridays, September 20-November 8|10:30 a.m. - noon

July,1914: One hundred years of European peace, ancient empires ruled, unbridled progress - and all shattered by war on an industrial scale.  World War I changed the world forever.

Instructor(s):
Whitney Lloyd
Fridays, September 20-November 8|10 - 11:30 a.m.

In the context of our challenging contemporary political situation, it is refreshing to revisit the Early American Statesmen, who launched our nation almost 259 years ago.  Pulitzer Prize winning Joseph Ellis is both insightful in his examination of the leading characters in a turbulent era.

Instructor(s):
Paula Kalamaras
Tuesdays, September 24-November 12|10 - 11:30 a.m.

For as long as human beings have had language, they have had myths.  Mythology is our earliest form of literary expression and the foundation of all history and morality. 


Book: The World of Myth, David Leeming

Instructor(s):
Professional Staff
Tuesdays, September 24-October 29|1-2 p.m.

Using the Must CMA campaign artworks as our starting point, we’ll get familiar with thought-provoking objects in the collection. 

Instructor(s):
Barbara Parr
Tuesdays, September 24-November 12|1-2:30 p.m.

As America has become more polarized, Haidt challenges conventional thinking about morality, politics, and religion in a way that speaks to everyone on the political spectrum.

Instructor(s):
Professional Staff
Thursdays, September 26-October 31|1-2 p.m.

Using the Must CMA campaign artworks as our starting point, we’ll get familiar with thought-provoking objects in the collection.

 

Instructor(s):
Linda Goodman Robiner
Wednesdays, October 02 - 30|10 a.m.-noon

This workshop will provide a window into important times in your life: how it was to grow up in your home, to survive adolescence, what made you who you are. This journey will help you reflect on your life. Simple exercises and prompts will lead you to write to short vignettes.

Instructor(s):
Paula Kalamaras
Sundays, October 06-November 24|5-6:30 p.m.

For as long as human beings have had language, they have had myths.  Mythology is our earliest form of literary expression and  the foundation of all history and morality. 

Book: The World of Myth, David Leeming

Instructor(s):
D.M. Pulley
Wednesdays, October 09, October 23 and November 06|6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

Reader Series classes will cover three books in a short period of time, taking you on a deep dive into specific topic or author to gain a more advanced understanding of literature and the world.

Instructor(s):
Nicholas Brennecke, Peter Whitehouse
Wednesdays, October 9 - November 6|4 - 5:30 p.m.

What do we need to learn individually and together to help us design our personal and collective future? This series of five independent but interlinked sessions will address this topic through different lenses.

Instructor(s):
Sue Kisch
Thursdays, October 10-November 14|1-3 p.m.

How does it feel to age? Do the changes to our bodies and psyches come as a shock, as a challenge, or as natural processes? Join the conversation as we explore the issues of growing older as portrayed in the short stories of such writers as Saul Bellow, Joyce Carol Oates, Grace Paley, V.S. Pritchett and many others.

Instructor(s):
Bernard Jim
Tuesdays, October 15-November 5|10 a.m. - noon

This course will focus on reading and discussing Alain de Botton’s book, The Architecture of Happiness. In his book, de Botton explores new ways of evaluating the built world beyond the simple dichotomies of beautiful or ugly. He asks instead, what values are embodied in design, and how can architecture help us realize our best self.

Instructor(s):
Sylvia Abrams
Wednesdays, October 23-December 4|10 - 11:30 a.m.

Jill Lepore has created a readable, one volume history of the United States that relates its past in the light of present concerns. Lepore recounts major events—the Revolution, Civil War, World Wars, Vietnam, September 11, and the war on terror, as well as the roles of slavery and women.

Instructor(s):
Mondays, October 28-November 25|10 a.m.-noon

Genesis: The cosmos are created, and first families are formed. Alanna Cooper, Director, Jewish Studies at CWRU-Siegal | Exodus: Through unlikely miracles, Egypt's slaves claim self-determination. Brian Amkraut, Executive Director, CWRU-Siegal | Leviticus: An exploration of the mysterious rites and rituals of temple life.

Instructor(s):
Mondays, October 28-November 25|6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

Genesis: The cosmos are created, and first families are formed. Alanna Cooper, Director, Jewish Studies at CWRU-Siegal | Exodus: Through unlikely miracles, Egypt's slaves claim self-determination. Brian Amkraut, Executive Director, CWRU-Siegal | Leviticus: An exploration of the mysterious rites and rituals of temple life.

Instructor(s):
Donna Rumenik
Mondays, October 28-November 18 (please note date change)|1-3 p.m.

Early research on the Holocaust largely overlooked the role of gender in determining how Jewish women survived or perished. The same omission was true in the study of how ordinary German women experienced and participated in the Holocaust.

Instructor(s):
Marion Boyer
Wednesdays, October 30 - November 20|1-3 p.m.

Writing in the voice of a persona offers a special creative opportunity to adopt the personality, history, diction and obsessions of someone (or something!) other than yourself.

Instructor(s):
Michelle R. Smith
Saturdays, November 02-16|10 a.m.-noon

Reader Series classes will cover three books in a short period of time, taking you on a deep dive into specific topic or author to gain a more advanced understanding of literature and the world.

Instructor(s):
John Richards
November 04-25|3 - 5 p.m.

Euripides, the most 'modern' of the ancient Greek playwrights, examines human flaws as well as noble actions and regularly challenges the assumptions of his audience. In this course, we will read and discuss four of his plays that confront various societal norms: Iphigenia at Aulis, Medea, Hippolytus, and Bacchants.

Instructor(s):
Brian Amkraut
Tuesdays, November 5 - 26 (please note date changes)|7-8:30 p.m.

While Jewish life in America has been, by most measures, a great success story, the so-called New World nevertheless has offered its share of difficulties. From the earliest days or organized Jewish settlement in the Americas to the challenges of the 21st century, Jews have confronted variations on the theme of an age-old hatred.

Instructor(s):
Darlene Montonaro
Wednesdays, November 6-December 4|10 a.m.-noon

Showing up to write isn’t half the battle – it is the battle. This class will help you develop writing habits that will boost your confidence, help you find your "voice," and keep your writing process in motion.

Instructor(s):
Darlene Montonaro
Wednesdays, November 06 - December 04|1:30-3:30 p.m.

Showing up to write isn’t half the battle – it is the battle. This class will help you develop writing habits that will boost your confidence, help you find your "voice," and keep your writing process in motion.

Instructor(s):
James Godfrey
Mondays, November 25-December 16|1-2:30 p.m.

The Opium Wars (1839-1860) between the Chinese Empire and Great Britain were fought as a result of what amounted to a state sanctioned illicit narcotics trade.

Instructor(s):
John Orlock
Tuesday, December 03-Thursday, December 05|1:30-3:30 p.m.

“IS THIS THE WORST?”: LEAR AND THE BLEAKNESS OF PROSPECTS
Tuesday, December 3 | 1:30–3:30 p.m.

Instructor(s):
Mondays, December 09-January 27 (no class Dec 23, Dec 30, Jan 20)|10 a.m.-noon

Joshua: The Israelites' heroic new leader ushers them into the Land. Jeremy Bruce, Principal, Stark High School at Fuchs Mizrachi | Judges: Powerful arbiters and warriors guide the people in times of war and peace.

Instructor(s):
Mondays, December 9-January 27 (no class Dec 23, Dec 30, Jan 20)|6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

Joshua: The Israelites' heroic new leader ushers them into the Land. Jeremy Bruce, Principal, Stark High School at Fuchs Mizrachi | Judges: Powerful arbiters and warriors guide the people in times of war and peace.

Instructor(s):
Allison Monroe
Wednesdays, January 8-29|1:30-3:30 p.m.

If asked what instruments were played in European “classical” or “art” music, most people would think of the piano, the voice, and instruments used in the orchestra such as the violin, the oboe, or the trombone. Fewer would list the vielle, the shawm, the theorbo, or the sackbut, and yet all of these featured in music of their own times.

Instructor(s):
Mondays, February 3-March 16 (no class Feb 17, Mar 9)|10 a.m.-noon

Isaiah: Prophesizes exile and redemption for the ten tribes of the northern kingdom. Noah Bickart, Visiting Assistant Professor, John Carroll University. | Jeremiah: Rebukes his people for depravity and idolatry, and issues warnings of their destruction.

Instructor(s):
Mondays, February 3-March 16 (no class Feb 17, Mar 9)|6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

Isaiah: Prophesizes exile and redemption for the ten tribes of the northern kingdom. Noah Bickart, Visiting Assistant Professor, John Carroll University. | Jeremiah: Rebukes his people for depravity and idolatry, and issues warnings of their destruction.

Instructor(s):
Mondays, March 23-April 27 (no class April 13)|10 a.m.-noon

Song of Songs: sensuous poetry, which captures the many dimensions of love. Amalia Haas, Rabbinic Candidate, Yeshivat Maharat | Ruth: a story of friendship and loyalty, which humanizes the needs of vulnerable outsiders. Dahna Baskin, Instructor, CWRU-Siegal | Lamentations: a mournful elegy of human fragility and loss.

Instructor(s):
Mondays, March 23-April 27 (no class April 13)|6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

Song of Songs: sensuous poetry, which captures the many dimensions of love. Amalia Haas, Rabbinic Candidate, Yeshivat Maharat | Ruth: a story of friendship and loyalty, which humanizes the needs of vulnerable outsiders. Dahna Baskin, Instructor, CWRU-Siegal | Lamentations: a mournful elegy of human fragility and loss.

Instructor(s):
Mondays, May 4-June 15 (no class May 25)|10 a.m.-noon

Psalms: among the Bible's most well-known verses, these 150 poems put words to feelings of thanksgiving, joy, and lament. Eddie Sukol, Rabbi, The Shul | Proverbs: wit and wisdom in the form of one-line advice to the young and old.

Instructor(s):
Mondays, May 4-June 15 (no class May 25)|6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

Psalms: among the Bible's most well-known verses, these 150 poems put words to feelings of thanksgiving, joy, and lament. Eddie Sukol, Rabbi, The Shul | Proverbs: wit and wisdom in the form of one-line advice to the young and old.