Courses

Instructor(s):
Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays; January 30-April 19|1:30-3:30 p.m.

Tuesdays:

The Warren Court – Part II

In 1954 President Dwight Eisenhower appointed California Governor Earl Warren to be Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. Over the next 16 years the Warren Court would review, interpret and decide cases with far-reaching implications.

Instructor(s):
Barbara Greenberg & Luke Reader
Tuesdays, January 30-April 17|1:30–3:30 p.m.

THE WARREN COURT – Part II 
Tuesdays, January 30-March 6

Instructor(s):
John Orlock & Daniel Goldmark
Wednesdays, January 31-April 18|1:30–3:30 p.m.

Through a combination of close reading, critical analysis, and research inquiry, the class will navigate a rigorous exploration of what makes The Tragical History of Hamlet Prince of Denmark – a play over four hundred years old – the enduring drama that it is? 

Instructor(s):
Henry Adams & Alan Rocke
Thursdays, February 1-April 19 | No classes March 13, 14, 15 – CWRU Spring Break|1:30–3:30 p.m.

AMERICAN LANDSCAPE PAINTING: WILDERNESS, PROGRESS, AND AMERICAN IDENTITY 
Thursdays, February 1-March 8

Instructor(s):
Rivka Taub
Tuesdays, February 6-May 1|10 a.m.-noon

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language as well as enjoy Hebrew Literature, songs, drama and film, read Israeli newspapers and view Israeli television. 

Instructor(s):
Leah Cooper
Tuesdays, February 6-May 8 | No class April 3 & 17|6:30–8:30 p.m.

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language as well as enjoy Hebrew Literature, songs, drama and film, read Israeli newspapers and view Israeli television.

Instructor(s):
Leah Cooper
Wednesdays, February 7-May 9 | No class April 4 & 11|6:30–8:30 p.m.

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language as well as enjoy Hebrew Literature, songs, drama and film and read Israeli newspapers and view Israeli television.

Instructor(s):
Rivka Taub
Wednesdays, February 7-May 2 | No class April 4| 1–3 p.m.

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language as well as enjoy Hebrew Literature, songs, drama and film and read Israeli newspapers and view Israeli television.

Instructor(s):
Judith Shamir
Wednesdays, February 7-May 9 | No class April 4 & 11|6:30–8:30 p.m.

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language as well as enjoy Hebrew Literature, songs, drama and film and read Israeli newspapers and view Israeli television.

Instructor(s):
Judith Shamir
Thursdays, February 8-May 3 | No class April 5|10 a.m.–noon

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language as well as enjoy Hebrew Literature, songs, drama and film and read Israeli newspapers and view Israeli television.

Instructor(s):
Dahna Gordon Baskin
Mondays, February 12-May 14 | No class February 19 & April 2|6:30-8:30 p.m.

Classical Hebrew allows learners of all levels to read the Bible in its original language.

Instructor(s):
Charlene Miletti
Sundays, March 18-May 6|5-6:30 p.m.

Maurizio Viroli brings to life the fascinating writer of The Prince, who was the founder of modern political thought.

Instructor(s):
Whitney Lloyd
Mondays, March 19-May 7|10:30 a.m.-noon

McCullough’s biography of Harry S. Truman explores the life of the accidental president, who was the architect of the Cold War and an innovative reformer.

Book: Truman, David McCullough

Instructor(s):
Jim Lane
Mondays, March 19-May 7|1-2:30 p.m.

Delve into the realms of science, mythology, spirituality, appearance, illusion, and reality as they apply to our place in the natural world. The two novels we will read explore profound personal, societal, philosophical and religious questions. Books: Siddhartha, Herman Hesse; Ishmael, Daniel Quinn

Instructor(s):
Barbara Greenberg
Mondays, March 19-May 7|10-11:30 a.m.

Jodi Picoult’s novel Small Great Things focuses on racial tensions in a small hospital that flood out into the larger community.

Instructor(s):
Barbara Parr
Mondays, March 19-May 7|1-2:30 p.m.

This book discussion course examines George Orwell’s classic 1984, which is, perhaps, more relevant today than it was when published in 1948. Discussions focus on the literary merit of the novel as well as the cultural, philosophical, and political topics Orwell includes.

Instructor(s):
Joe Konen
Tuesdays, March 20-May 8|10-11:30 a.m.

The story of the gene is one of the great mystery narratives of science. In this book, Pulitzer Prize-winning author, Siddhartha Mukherjee, weaves together the history of genetics with his family’s history of mental illness.

Instructor(s):
Jim Lane
Tuesdays, March 20-May 8|1-2:30 p.m.

Put on your bell-bottoms and grab your granny glasses, tie-dyes and beads! Let’s do a little back-to-the-future time travel to the seminal decade of the 1960s. Utilizing a compilation of articles originally published in the New Yorker, we will re-examine the confrontations over civil rights, economics, Vietnam, and lifestyles.

Instructor(s):
Barbara Greenberg
Tuesdays, March 20-May 8|7:30-9 p.m.

Jodi Picoult’s novel Small Great Things focuses on racial tensions in a small hospital that flood out into the larger community.

Instructor(s):
Barbara Greenberg, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies
Tuesdays, March 20-May 8|10-11:30 a.m.

Using the United States Constitution and the Bill of Rights as our text, each class focuses on these treasured words and related landmark United States Supreme Court cases to illustrate how the decisions affect our daily lives.

Instructor(s):
Bill Pennington
Tuesdays, March 20-May 8 |10-11:30 a.m.

Obviously, this 100-year-old classic by British author Kenneth Grahame appeals to all generations. But according to two, recently-published, annotated versions and an Oxford World Classics special edition, The Wind in the Willows was really written for adults.

Instructor(s):
Betty Zak
Wednesdays, March 21-May 9|10–11:30 a.m.

The Vatican and others called her a Pirate Queen and a master of the spies as she transformed England into an imposing empire. Discover her power and intrigue, her swashbuckling mariners who terrorized the seas and the brilliance of a spymaster who exploited double agents, deciphered codes, and laid a foundation for international espionage. 

Instructor(s):
Barbara Parr
Thursdays, March 22-May 10|10-11:30 a.m.

This book discussion course examines George Orwell’s classic 1984, which is, perhaps, more relevant today than it was when published in 1948. Discussions focus on the literary merit of the novel as well as the cultural, philosophical, and political topics Orwell includes.

Instructor(s):
Sol Factor
Thursdays, March 22–May 10|2–3:30 p.m.

The team of Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II totally changed the American Musical both in structure and also how difficult subject matter was to be presented. They were not afraid to deal with subject matter ranging from inter-racial relationships, abusive husbands, racial prejudices, to Nazi takeovers.

Instructor(s):
Charlene Mileti
Thursdays, March 22-May 10|1:30-3 p.m.

In the fifth century, Athens, Greece, was a burgeoning democracy, the first of its kind to exist in human history. Born in 494 BCE, Pericles of Athens would rise to become one of the city's most beloved leaders.

Instructor(s):
Cheryl Wires
Thursdays, March 22-May 10 |10–11:30 a.m.

T.S. Eliot praised The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins as “the first…and the best of modern English detective novels.” Literary critics concur, crediting Collins, along with Edgar Allan Poe, with creating the detective genre.

Instructor(s):
Bill Pennington
Thursdays, March 22-May 10|10-11:30 a.m.

Obviously, this 100-year-old classic by British author Kenneth Grahame appeals to all generations. But according to two, recently-published, annotated versions and an Oxford World Classics special edition, The Wind in the Willows was really written for adults.

Instructor(s):
Joe Konen
Fridays, March 23-May 11|10:30 a.m.-noon

This book offers us a vehicle for a nuanced understanding of Islam. Carla Power, a Western reporter who grew up in several predominantly Muslim countries, writes of her dialogues with prominent India-born and now London-based Sheikh Mohammad Akram Nadwi. The dialogue enlightens us on a nonviolent understanding of Islam.

Instructor(s):
Jim Van Horn
Fridays, March 23-May 11|10-11:30 a.m.

One hundred thousand years ago at least six species inhabited earth. Today, just one. Us. Homo Sapiens. How did our species succeed in the battle for dominance? Create cities and kingdoms?

Instructor(s):
Ezra Blaustein
Tuesdays, April 10–May 1|6:30-8:30 p.m.

This course will study the Quran's presentation of characters and stories found in the Hebrew Bible. We will explore the similarities and differences between the tales as they appear in the Quran and as they appear in the Torah.

Instructor(s):
Andrea Peck
Tuesdays, April 10–May 1|6:30-8 p.m.

"There is no greater agony than bearing an untold story inside you." - Maya Angelou

Instructor(s):
Leatrice Rabinsky
Tuesdays, April 10–May 15|1–3 p.m.

In the 14th and 15th centuries, many Jews converted to Christianity to remain alive, while continuing to practice Judaism secretly. In 1492, during the Spanish Inquisition, many of these "crypto" or "secret" Jews, also referred to as Marranos and Conversos, escaped to Portugal and other areas on the continent.

Instructor(s):
David Huston
Thursdays, April 12-May 17 |6:30-8 p.m.

America has been called “the first new nation.” It did not grow organically from time immemorial; it was deliberately created by groups of people who harbored deep and often conflicting ideas about what sort of nation they were actually founding.

Instructor(s):
Susan Kisch
Thursdays, April 12–May 17|1–3 p.m.

G’day. Australia is a world away and its official language is English but its history, identity, natural environment and indigenous cultures are different from the American experience. In this course, we will examine these diversities and how they are expressed in short stories.

Instructor(s):
Sylvia Abrams
Fridays, April 13-May 4|2-3:30 p.m.

Count Alexandar Rostov has been sentenced to house arrest in Moscow’s Metropol Hotel by a Bolshevik tribunal. How Rostov constructs a meaningful life is the center of Amor Towles best-selling novel, A Gentleman in Moscow.

Instructor(s):
Matt Goldish
Mondays, April 16–May 7|6:30–8:30 p.m.

The concept of the Messiah has played an enormous role in Jewish thought and history. We will explore literature about the Messiah and the future redemption, and we will learn about a series of Jewish figures who presented themselves as the Messiah over the past two millennia.

Instructor(s):
Sylvia Abrams
Mondays, April 23-May 14|1:30-3:30 p.m.

Rachel Kalish weaves an extraordinary mystery in The Weight of Ink, when Helen Watt, an ailing scholar of Jewish history, is asked to examine a treasure trove of seventeenth-century documents apparently untouched for three centuries in an old London house. Watts and her assistance, Aaron Levy, are an unlikely pair of literary detectives.

Instructor(s):
Brian Amkraut
Tuesdays, April 24–May 15|7–9 p.m.

For a century following the French Revolution, the Jewish citizens of France felt accepted and welcomed as part of Europe's largest democracy. That view was shattered with the arrest, trial and retrial of Captain Alfred Dreyfus on charges of espionage and the heated public debate around his guilt or innocence.

Instructor(s):
Linda Tuthill
Tuesdays, May 1-June 5|1–3 p.m

The class will share memories that have been distilled and shaped into memoir.

Located in the Kutina Classroom

Instructor(s):
Angel Foss
Wednesdays, May 2-23|6:30-7:30 p.m.

A class for individuals of all abilities involving unique movement exercises using drumsticks, drums, exercise balls, and rhythmic, music for a "whole mind, whole body" experience.

Limited Enrollment of 15.

Instructor(s):
Linda Tuthill
Wednesdays, May 2-June 6 |1–3 p.m.

The class will share memories that have been distilled and shaped into memoir.

Located in the Kutina Classroom

Instructor(s):
Linda Tuthill
Thursdays, May 3–June 7|1–3 p.m.

Poets develop the habit of paying close attention to the world around them and look for fresh ways of seeing and connecting images. Bring 15 copies of a poem to the first class.

Located in the Pink Pig.

Instructor(s):
Timothy O. Matson
Fridays, May 4- June 8|6:30-9 a.m.

Explore the bluebird trail, watch busy bobolinks, or be rewarded with a rare sighting of Henslow’s Sparrow. May and June are busy months for birds. A continental breakfast will be available at the Pink Pig following each morning’s activities.

Located in the Greenhouse Parking Lot

Instructor(s):
Peggy Wertheim
Tuesdays, May 8-29|1–4 p.m.

Discover, create and explore the exciting techniques of Batik and Silk Painting inspired by the natural beauty of Squire Valleevue Farm.

Limited enrollment. A materials fee of $35 is payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

Located in the Honey House

Instructor(s):
Barbara Parr
Wednesdays, May 9-May 30|7-8:30 p.m.

To Kill a Mockingbird is a masterpiece of American literature that speaks to our current time as poignantly as it did in 1960. This work continues to be banned from school reading lists due to its controversial subject material.

Instructor(s):
Alanna Cooper
Wednesdays, May 9-June 6|6:30-8 p.m.

The Aleppo Codex is the oldest Hebrew Bible in existence today. Scribed around 900 CE in Tiberius, it traveled to Aleppo, Syria, in the 15th century, where it was preserved for 500 years. From there it was smuggled to Israel just after the founding of the state, but in the process, many of its sacred pages went missing.

Instructor(s):
Patricia Sigmier
Fridays, June 1-29|10 a.m.–2 p.m.

In this course, we will explore painting in the outdoors using watercolor or the medium of your choice. Students of all skill levels, including beginners, are welcome. Each student will be instructed individually and work at his/her own pace. Bring a bag lunch.

Limited Enrollment

Instructor(s):
Alan Levenson
Monday, June 4–Wednesday, June 6|10 a.m.-noon

The issues most at stake in the Jewish world today have roots in the great debates emerging in the early modern era: Western Jews’ relationship to Israel and Zionism, how to address anti–Semitism, and the contours of Jewish identity.

Instructor(s):
Jay Abercrombie
Wednesdays, June 6-20|10 a.m.–noon

This field seminar provides a close look at the plants, wildlife, and geology of Squire Valleevue Farm.  No strenuous hiking will be involved, but participants should be able to maintain an active pace over generally moderate but occasionally hilly or wet terrain. Meet in the Greenhouse Parking Lot.

Instructor(s):
Cheryl Wires
Wednesdays, June 13-27|7-8:30 p.m.

In this three-week series, we’ll discuss The Gentle Subversive, Mark Hamilton Lytle’s account of Rachel Carson’s life and lasting legacy. By writing Silent Spring, this woman scientist reluctantly challenged the 1960s establishment regarding pesticide use.