Courses

Instructor(s):
Janice Vitullo
Mondays, April 20-June 1 (please note new dates)|10 - 11:30 a.m.

In this course, students will be exposed to Latin poetry in its original language through a guided translation of the story of the marriage of Peleus and Thetis from Catullus’s “mini-epic” poem 64. Prose can be read in translation with little loss; poetry, on the other hand, loses a great deal in translation.

Instructor(s):
Mondays, May 4-June 15 (no class May 25)|6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

Psalms: among the Bible's most well-known verses, these 150 poems put words to feelings of thanksgiving, joy, and lament. Eddie Sukol, Rabbi, The Shul | Proverbs: wit and wisdom in the form of one-line advice to the young and old.

Instructor(s):
Leah Cooper
Mondays, May 4-June 15 (no class May 25)|10 a.m.-noon

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language as well as enjoy Hebrew literature, songs, drama, and film, read Israeli newspapers and view Israeli television.
 

Instructor(s):
Mondays, May 4-June 15 (no class May 25)|10 a.m.-noon

Psalms: among the Bible's most well-known verses, these 150 poems put words to feelings of thanksgiving, joy, and lament. Eddie Sukol, Rabbi, The Shul | Proverbs: wit and wisdom in the form of one-line advice to the young and old.

Instructor(s):
Patrick Moore
Tuesdays, May 5-June 9|1:30-3 p.m.

1914 - 100 years of European peace, ancient empires ruled, unbridled progress, industrial expansion - and all shattered by war on an industrial scale. World War One changed the world forever.

Instructor(s):
Angela Fasick
Tuesdays, May 12-June 16|10 - 11:30 a.m.

Do you have a memoir in the bottom drawer of your desk? A folder on Google Drive with ideas for essays? Would you like to? This course will introduce you to two of the many forms of creative nonfiction: essay and memoir.

Instructor(s):
Leah Cooper
Tuesdays, May 19 - June 23|6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language as well as enjoy Hebrew Literature, songs, drama and film, read Israeli newspapers and view Israeli television.

Instructor(s):
Meghan Strong
Thursdays, May 21-June 25|1:30-3:30 p.m.

Pyramids are synonymous with Ancient Egypt. Despite the fascination with these ancient stone monuments, they are still a source of great speculation and mystery. Archaeologists, astronomers, architects, engineers, physicists, historians, and countless others have all tried to wrestle with the many riddles of Egyptian pyramids.

Instructor(s):
Leah Cooper
Thursdays, May 21-June 25|10 a.m. - noon

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language as well as enjoy Hebrew Literature, songs, drama and film, read Israeli newspapers and view Israeli television. 
 

Instructor(s):
Rivka Taub
Tuesdays, May 26 - June 30|10 a.m. - noon

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language as well as enjoy Hebrew Literature, songs, drama and film, read Israeli newspapers and view Israeli television.

Instructor(s):
Judith Shamir
Tuesdays, May 26 - June 23|10 a.m. - noon

Hebrew literature engages advanced students in fictional novels and plays by leading Israeli authors and playwrights.

Instructor(s):
Rivka Taub
Wednesdays, May 27 - June 24|1-3 p.m.

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language as well as enjoy Hebrew Literature, songs, drama and film, read Israeli newspapers and view Israeli television. 

Instructor(s):
Betty Zak
Wednesdays, May 27 - July 1|10 - 11:30 a.m. EST

Both Catherine and Peter were called “Great”. Yet, why? Here is a Hint: Our Book is entitled: Catherine The Great, Love, Sex, and Power. Delve into a reflection on Peter the Great and Russia’s background. Then, uncover the life & times of Catherine.

Instructor(s):
Angela Fasick
Thursdays, May 28-June 18|10 - 11:30 a.m. EST

Written in 1850 but set in the Massachusetts Bay Colony during the 1640s, Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter is both moral tale and mystery. Full of symbolism and imagery, the novel explores Puritan New England through the life of Hester Prynne and her daughter Pearl.

Instructor(s):
Jay Abercrombie
Wednesdays, June 3–17 |10 a.m. - noon

This field study looks at the plants, wildlife, and geology of Squire Valleevue Farm. No strenuous hiking will be involved, but participants should be able to maintain an active pace over generally moderate but occasionally hilly or wet terrain.

Instructor(s):
Marion Boyer
Wednesdays, June 3-July 1|1-3 p.m.

Story, Structure, Music, and Imagination are what Gregory Orr calls the natural temperaments of writers, and each writer has one of these temperaments that comes easily to us, is nearly instinctive, is the strength we lean into when we write.

Instructor(s):
Carol Salus
Wednesdays, June 3-24|1:30-3:30 p.m.

Picasso’s work is like a diary, as he stated. Through a chronological approach, examples of his paintings, prints, drawings, ceramics, sculptures, and designs for décor and costumes for the Ballets Russes will be discussed.

Instructor(s):
Holly Litwin
Thursdays, June 4 - July 9|6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

Beginner Classical Hebrew exposes students to the sights and sounds of the original Hebrew letters as they appear in the Bible. Students will have multiple opportunities to absorb the content using various activities, games, and manipulatives.

Instructor(s):
Rivka Taub
Thursdays, June 4 - July 9|6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language as well as enjoy Hebrew Literature, songs, drama and film, read Israeli newspapers and view Israeli television. 
 

Instructor(s):
Judith Shamir
Thursdays, June 4 - July 9|10 a.m. - noon

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language as well as enjoy Hebrew Literature, songs, drama and film, read Israeli newspapers and view Israeli television. 

Instructor(s):
Pat Sigmier
Fridays, June 5-26|10 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Enjoy the experience of painting outdoors at the CWRU’s scenic Squire Valleevue and Valley Ridge Farms. The instructor uses watercolor, however any medium is acceptable. The group meets each session at a predetermined location on the farm, paints for 2–3 hours, and then gathers for a bag lunch and viewing of the paintings.

Instructor(s):
Josh Meyers
Mondays, June 08-29|7-8:30 p.m. EST

The link between Jews and revolution is often taken for granted, yet in practice has been far more tumultuous. This course will explore the ways that revolutionary thinkers understood Jews and Jewish identity, and the assumptions that underlay their approaches.  
 

Instructor(s):
Barbara Burgess-Van Aken
Tuesdays, June 9-30|noon-2 p.m. EST

A theme that Shakespeare often explores in his plays is illusion vs. Reality. What makes it hard to distinguish between the two? What happens when characters perceive illusions as real? How do characters create illusions? What does it take for a character to see through an illusion?

Instructor(s):
Rachel Sabath Beit-Halachmi
Tuesdays, June 16-July 07|10 - 11:30 a.m. EST

The course will focus on significant texts and Jewish thinkers in times of crises. What principles guided their thinking? From Moses to the Rabbis of the Talmud, to Theodore Herzl to Henrietta Szold, the course will focus on a study of primary texts and the core principles of four thinkers as they confronted major crises. 

Instructor(s):
Janice Vitullo
Fridays, June 19-July 24|10 - 11:30 a.m. EST

Socrates was condemned to death in 399 BCE by his fellow Athenian citizens. He left no writings of his own, but his student Plato describes his trial and execution in these four Socratic dialogues: Euthyphro, Crito, Apology and Phaedo.

Instructor(s):
Barbara Greenberg
Mondays, June 22-July 13|10 - 11:30 a.m. EST

The United States has a larger immigrant population than any other country in the world, leading many to believe that, until recent times, the United States has always had an open door policy.

Instructor(s):
Daniel Goldmark
Wednesdays, June 24 - July 8|10 - 11:30 a.m. EST

The Jewish Lives series, published by Yale University Press, explores the stories of historical and present-day influential individuals whose Jewish experiences shaped their contributions to culture, science, and politics. Local professors lead these book discussions.

Instructor(s):
Paula Kalamaras
Thursdays, June 25-July 16|10 - 11:30 a.m. EST

This course will study the mythologies of the world contrasting their differences and also the commonalities that all societies share. The text by Roy Willis and Robert Walker divides the mythologies of the world into regions and zones, providing a background for the discussion.

Instructor(s):
Avinoam J. Patt, Ph.D
Tuesdays, June 30-July 21|10 - 11:30 a.m. EST

Why are the Jews so funny? What is unique about Jewish humor?

Instructor(s):
Professional Staff
Tuesday, June 30; Tuesday, July 7 & Sunday, July 12|Varied

Join us for a close-up look at the Tony Award-winning musical comedy Something Rotten! Following two lectures, participants will enjoy a matinee performance on Sunday, July 12. 

Instructor(s):
Pat Moore
Thursdays, July 2-August 6|1:30-3 p.m. EST

In this course, we will review the foundations of US citizenship and discuss how our founders expected us, the American people, to properly fulfill our citizenship role.

Instructor(s):
Caitlyn Kelly
Mondays, July 6-27|1-3 p.m. EST

When it arrived on Broadway in 2015, Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Hamilton: An American Musical was an instant success, selling out months in advance. With a national tour to follow, the show quickly captured the imaginations of history buffs and theater aficionados across the country.

Instructor(s):
Steve Pinkerton
Tuesdays, July 7 - August 11|1-3 p.m. EST
Instructor(s):
Timothy Wutrich
Tuesdays, July 7-28 |9:30 - 11:30 a.m. EST

This course will focus on selected plays written by Aeschylus, the earliest tragedies to survive in European literature. Aeschylus preferred to write plays that were thematically connected, such as The Oresteia, which deals with the homecoming of Agamemnon from the Trojan War.

Instructor(s):
Karen Laurence
Wednesdays, July 8-29|1:30-3:30 p.m. EST

This summer, the XXXII Modern Olympiad will take place in Tokyo, Japan. But what are the ancient origins of these Modern Olympic Games? Sports festivals in ancient Greece were celebrated as major religious rituals to gods such as Zeus, Poseidon, Athena, and Apollo.

Instructor(s):
Mara Cohen Ioannides
Mondays, July 13 - August 3|10:30 a.m. - noon EST

Beginning with the Colonial Period and the opening of the Ohio River Valley, through the Louisiana Purchase and statehood, discover how the west became a haven for Jewish immigrants. Join us to examine the development of the American Jewish Midwestern experience.

Instructor(s):
Ezra Blaustein
Wednesdays, July 15 - 29|10 - 11:30 a.m. EST

The Jewish Lives series, published by Yale University Press, explores the stories of historical and present-day influential individuals whose Jewish experiences shaped their contributions to culture, science, and politics. Local professors lead these book discussions.

Instructor(s):
Paula Kalamaras
Thursdays, July 23-August 13|10 - 11:30 a.m. EST

Part two of this two-part series will study the mythologies of the world contrasting their differences and also the commonalities that all societies share. The text by Roy Willis and Robert Walker divides the mythologies of the world into regions and zones, providing a background for the discussion.

Instructor(s):
Darlene Montonaro
Wednesdays, August 5-26|10 a.m. - noon

Showing up to write isn’t half the battle – it is the battle. This class will help you develop writing habits that will boost your confidence, help you find your "voice," and keep your writing process in motion.

Instructor(s):
Jo Bruce
Wednesdays, August 5 - 19|10 - 11:30 a.m. EST

The Jewish Lives series, published by Yale University Press, explores the stories of historical and present-day influential individuals whose Jewish experiences shaped their contributions to culture, science, and politics. Local professors lead these book discussions.

Instructor(s):
Michael Ungar
Thursdays, August 6-20|6:30-8 p.m.

There is a standard Jewish joke that our bodies serve only one purpose...to hold up our Yiddishe Kups (our Jewish minds). Judaism, however, does teach about the importance of caring for our bodies; they are holy vessels given to us by God. We will examine some texts on the relationship between our minds, our bodies and our spirits...

Instructor(s):
Moria Ran
Thursdays, August 6-27|10 - 11:30 a.m. EST

The coexistence of Orthodoxy and feminism sounds like an oxymoron to many. However, in today’s world, there is a vibrant movement to develop the social and religious roles of women within Orthodox communities.

Instructor(s):
John Richards
Thursdays, August 6 - September 10|10 - 11:30 a.m. EST

Herodotus' work has come down to us as the first composition of Greek history and presents us with an incredibly expansive and detailed amalgam of theology, science, theater, and philosophy.

Instructor(s):
Anthony Wexler
Tuesdays, August 18-September 8 |10 - 11:30 a.m.

Join Anthony Wexler to delve into two powerful, and very different, works of Holocaust literature: Elie Wiesel’s iconic first-person testimony, Night (1960), and Art Spiegelman’s remarkable graphic novel, Maus (1991).

Instructor(s):
Mondays, October 12 - June 7 |6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

Journey through all twenty-four books of the Jewish Bible, studying them one-by-one, with master teachers as your guides. This unique approach explores the major themes, broad context, and key events of each book - all in an open, thoughtful, participatory atmosphere.

Instructor(s):
Mondays, October 12 - June 7 |10 a.m. - noon

Journey through all twenty-four books of the Jewish Bible, studying them one-by-one, with master teachers as your guides. This unique approach explores the major themes, broad context, and key events of each book - all in an open, thoughtful, participatory atmosphere.