Remote Courses

Instructor(s):
Daniel Melnick
Mondays, October 26 - November 30|2 - 4 p.m. EDT

In this course, we will study the remarkable breakthroughs across the arts and sciences in the first several decades of the twentieth century.

Instructor(s):
Ravenel Richardson
Wednesdays, October 28-November 18|11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. ET
Instructor(s):
Janice Vitullo
Mondays, November 2-23|10 - 11:30 a.m. ET

Euripides, the most ‘modern’ of the ancient Greek playwrights, examines human flaws as well as noble actions, and regularly challenges the assumptions of his audience. In this course, we will read and discuss three of his plays that confront various societal norms: Alcestis, which examines selfishness vs.

Instructor(s):
Brian Amkraut
Tuesdays, November 10 - December 1|7-8:30 p.m. EST
Instructor(s):
Carol Salus
Mondays, November 30 - December 21|10 - 11:30 a.m. EST

This course focuses on the study of select American artists in Europe from the colonial period to the post-1945 era. These artists were offered exposure to the great ateliers, museums, and frescoes overseas. A few of these artists in the twentieth century remained in the US for their professional training, yet they absorbed European sources.

Instructor(s):
Carli Leone
Tuesdays, December 1-22|1-2:30 p.m. ET

“These are unprecedented times.” This has become a common phrase used to describe the COVID-19 crisis, but is our experience truly unprecedented? In this course, we will examine three of the most devastating epidemics in American history: Yellow Fever in the 1790s, Spanish Flu in 1918, and HIV/AIDS in the 1980s.

Instructor(s):
Allison Monroe
Tuesdays, January 05-26|1:30-3:30 p.m. ET

The Boswell Sisters, the Andrews Sisters, the McGuire Sisters, the Shirelles, the Shangri-las, the Blossoms, the Marvelettes, the Ronettes, the Supremes – The early to mid-20th c. saw the flowering of a musical phenomenon – ensembles of three to five female vocalists, moving, singing, and even dressing alike.

Instructor(s):
Janice Vitullo
Tuesdays, January 5-February 23|10 - 11:30 a.m. ET

Join us for a close, guided reading of Homer’s great epic poem the Iliad. Participants will have the opportunity to engage in analysis and discussion of various aspects of the poem, including style, historical context, and the poem’s significance within the literary canon.

Instructor(s):
Dario Gasparini
Tuesdays, February 2–March 2|1:30-3:30 p.m. ET

Our built infrastructure is essential for our health and safety and our ability to work, travel, and recreate. The course will examine five historical examples of built infrastructure to illustrate the human endeavor involved and the immeasurable benefits of appropriate social investment and stewardship.

Instructor(s):
Darin Croft
Wednesdays, February 3–March 3|1:30-3:30 p.m. ET

Many of the most charismatic animals alive today are mammals. They range from familiar species we regularly see in our backyard, such as squirrels, mice, raccoons, and deer, to strange and exotic species that you may never have heard of such as pacaranas, colugos, sengis, and

Instructor(s):
Larry Josefovitz
Wednesdays, February 3-24|1-3 p.m. ET

The core repertoire of Verdi and Wagner owes much to the works of their great predecessors. Wagner sought Meyerbeer's influence, emulated him, and later reviled him in his essay, Judaism in Music. His admiration for Halevy's 1835 opera La Juive (The Jewess) however, was lifelong.

Instructor(s):
Shelley Bloomfield
Thursdays, February 4 -March 11 |1-2:30 p.m. ET

How did the Cold War era change the eerie inner landscape of the intelligence agent in our fiction? Has the spy become just one more variation on the antihero? How does he or she navigate times of greater moral ambiguity and cynicism?

Instructor(s):
Assaf Boker
Thursdays, February 18 - March 11|1-2:30 p.m. ET

Join Assaf Boker as he guides you through the history, archeology, religions, and sites of Jerusalem. Beginning with life in Jerusalem during the time of the Temple, visit the Southern Wall archaeological excavations where you will gain a better understanding of Jewish life 2000 years ago. Then travel to Mt.

Instructor(s):
Benjamin Sperry
Thursdays, March 4-25|10-11:30 a.m. ET

Abraham Lincoln’s tenure as U.S. president coincided almost exactly with the duration of the Civil War (1861-1865). During the course of his presidency, Lincoln’s articulation of the Northern cause evolved. His tone and his emphasis changed with changing circumstances.

Instructor(s):
Steven Windmueller
Thursdays, March 4-25|7-8 p.m. ET

Join Steven Windmueller for a look at American Jewish behavior in reaction to our country in crisis.

Instructor(s):
Shelley Bloomfield
Tuesdays, March 16–April 20|1:30-3:30 p.m. ET

When the character of the confident American, who believes himself at home everywhere, travels to the Old World, what he or she experiences reaches beyond the easy pleasures of museum and cafe. Over six weeks, we will explore the depiction of the American abroad in novels by Mark Twain, Henry James, F.