Remote Courses

Instructor(s):
Kristin Stasiowski
Wednesdays, April 14 - 28|7-8:30 p.m. ET

Join us for an introduction to the vibrant history, architecture, and art of the city of Siena. Over the course of three weeks, Dr.

Instructor(s):
David Starr
Thursdays, April 22 - May 13|3:30-5 p.m. ET

Are Jews a religion or a people? Some Jews (and non-Jews) believed that Judaism was a modern religion like Protestantism; others thought Judaism was political and national. This course considers this argument as it played out against the momentous changes in political and social life in the past three hundred years.
 

Instructor(s):
Monica Carol Miller
Wednesdays, April 28 - June 2|1-2:30 p.m. ET

The Nobel and Pulitzer Prize-winning work of William Faulkner is considered to be some of the most beautifully-crafted prose in the English language. In this course, we will read two of his most celebrated novels, As I Lay Dying (1930) and Absalom! Absalom!

Instructor(s):
Donna Rumenik
Tuesdays, May 4 - 25|10 a.m. - noon ET

Millions of men, women, and children were put into forced labor to benefit industry and agriculture in Hitler’s Germany and the occupied territories. From recruitment to roundups, this course will cover the brutal living and working conditions of those who were forced laborers.

Instructor(s):
Angela Fasick
Thursdays, May 6 - June 24|10-11:30 a.m. ET

While American literary history didn't begin in the 1850s in Concord, Massachusetts, it certainly blossomed there. This small town an hour west of Boston was home to a band of writers whose works still resonate with modern readers.

Instructor(s):
Barbara Burgess-Van Aken
Tuesdays, May 11 - June 1|noon-1:30 p.m. ET

Given that he wrote in an era of entrenched patriarchy, do Shakespeare’s plays reveal any pro-feminist sentiments? If so, did his representations of strong female characters change as his writing matured? And is there a relationship between Shakespeare’s choice of genre and the ways he gives power to his women?

Instructor(s):
Steve Klein
Wednesdays, May 12 - June 2 (please note date changes) |1:30-3 p.m. ET

Mainstream Jewry has encountered communities spanning Asia, Africa and the Americas claiming to belong to the Jewish people or to be descendants of lost Israelite tribes for centuries.

Instructor(s):
Janice Vitullo
Wednesdays, May 12 - 26|10 - 11:30 a.m. ET

Sophocles, one of the greatest of the Greek tragedians, gives us three plays popular in ancient Athens and still relevant today. Join us for a close reading and discussion of Oedipus Rex, Antigone, and Oedipus at Colonus. Major themes to be examined are the desire for truth at any cost, civil disobedience and a search for identity.

Instructor(s):
Anthony Wexler
Thursdays, May 13 - June 3|1:30-3 p.m. ET

Telling stories has been an integral part of Jewish life, from the tales that make up the Hebrew Bible to those about contemporary Jewish experiences. Jews have long used the short story to organize and understand the world and their place within it. In this short seminar, we’ll focus on stories written by Jewish-American authors since 1945.

Instructor(s):
Sarah Sager
Tuesdays, May 18 - June 8|1:30-3 p.m. ET

Join Sarah Sager as she leads a brief look at some of the cultural icons who have shaped American music, stage and film including Leonard Bernstein, Neil Simon, Steven Spielberg, and Steven Sondheim among others.
 

Instructor(s):
Leah Cooper
Mondays, May 24 - July 12|1 - 3 p.m. ET

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language to be able to read Israeli newspaper, view Israeli television, and enjoy Hebrew literature, songs, drama and film.
 

Instructor(s):
Judith Shamir
Tuesdays, May 25 - June 29|10 a.m. - noon ET

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language to be able to read Israeli newspaper, view Israeli television, and enjoy Hebrew literature, songs, drama and film.
 

Instructor(s):
Rivka Taub
Tuesdays, May 25 - June 29|10 a.m. - noon ET

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language to be able to read Israeli newspaper, view Israeli television, and enjoy Hebrew literature, songs, drama and film.
 

Instructor(s):
Leah Cooper
Tuesdays, May 25 - June 29|6:30 - 8:30 p.m. ET

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language to be able to read Israeli newspaper, view Israeli television, and enjoy Hebrew literature, songs, drama and film.
 

Instructor(s):
Holly Litwin
Wednesdays, May 26 - June 30|6:30 - 8:30 p.m. ET

Classical Hebrew exposes students to the sights and sounds of the original Hebrew letters appearing in the Bible. Students will have multiple opportunities to absorb the content using various activities, games, and manipulatives.
 

Instructor(s):
Rivka Taub
Wednesdays, May 26 - June 30|1-3 p.m. ET

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language to be able to read Israeli newspaper, view Israeli television, and enjoy Hebrew literature, songs, drama and film.
 

Instructor(s):
Holly Litwin
Thursdays, May 27 - July 1|6:30 - 8:30 p.m. ET

Classical Hebrew exposes students to the sights and sounds of the original Hebrew letters appearing in the Bible. Students will have multiple opportunities to absorb the content using various activities, games, and manipulatives.
 

Instructor(s):
Leah Cooper
Thursdays, May 27 - July 1 |10 a.m. - noon ET

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language to be able to read Israeli newspaper, view Israeli television, and enjoy Hebrew literature, songs, drama and film.
 

Instructor(s):
Judith Shamir
Thursdays, May 27 - July 1 |10 a.m. - noon ET

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language to be able to read Israeli newspaper, view Israeli television, and enjoy Hebrew literature, songs, drama and film.
 

Instructor(s):
Rivka Taub
Thursdays, May 27 - July 1|6:30 - 8:30 p.m. ET

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language to be able to read Israeli newspaper, view Israeli television, and enjoy Hebrew literature, songs, drama and film.
 

Instructor(s):
Leah Cooper
Fridays, May 28 - July 2|10 a.m. - noon ET

Conversational Hebrew allows students to reach their goal of communicating in Israel's native language to be able to read Israeli newspaper, view Israeli television, and enjoy Hebrew literature, songs, drama and film.
 

Instructor(s):
Shelley Bloomfield
Tuesdays and Thursdays, June 1 - 17|3-4:30 p.m. ET

What does the Cold War spy novel become in the hands of American writers? Do they raise the stakes and the body count? Are their spies more along the lines of the classic hero, with less cynicism and more faith in action and absolutes? Can we find in these stories what we would call a true American sensibility?

Instructor(s):
Patricia Sigmier
Wednesdays, June 2 - 23|10 - 11:30 a.m. ET

This collaborative plein air class is for students who enjoy painting outdoors. Painters will be given a concept or theme that will be the basis of their weekly assignment.

Instructor(s):
Michelle Smith Quarles
Wednesdays, June 2, 16, 30, July 14 (every other week)|10 - 11:30 a.m. ET

The future for American women imagined in Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale and The Testaments is very different from the future for American women imagined in Octavia Butler’s Parable of the Sower and Parable of the Talents. Why is that?

Instructor(s):
Bruce Ogron
Thursdays, June 3 - 24 |7-8:30 p.m. ET

The Merchant of Venice, Oliver Twist and Trilby are English literary classics, which have stood the test of time. Each work’s lasting relevance is due, in large part, to the influence of its leading Jewish character.

Instructor(s):
Earl Leiken
Fridays, June 4-July 2|10-11:30 a.m. ET

This course focuses on major developments already impacting our lives and adaptations that will be needed to address them.

Instructor(s):
Carol Salus
Mondays, June 7 - July 19 (no class July 5)|10-11:30 a.m. ET

In this course, we will examine a sampling of major figures from the many movements of the last decades of the twentieth century, including pop art, earth art, minimalism, feminism, and art dealing with racial issues.

Instructor(s):
Larry Josefovitz
Wednesdays, June 9 - 30|1-3 p.m. ET

A survey of the outstanding classical singers who flourished from the dawn of the recording era to the birth of the LP. Prior to the era of the Three Tenors, which made big money from few artists, there was a proliferation of great singing in every voice category.

Instructor(s):
Gregg Drinkwater
Wednesdays, June 9-23|7-8:30 p.m. ET

Harvey Milk was elected to the San Francisco Board of Supervisors in 1977, becoming the first openly gay man elected to public office in the United States. He had not even served a full year in office when he was shot by a homophobic fellow supervisor.

Instructor(s):
Daniel Sherman
Thursdays, June 10 - July 1|1:30 - 3:00 p.m. ET

This course will explore Israel’s relations with the region’s Arab states and the Palestinians as set within an increasingly charged and dynamic geopolitical landscape.

Instructor(s):
Whitney Lloyd
Mondays, June 21 - July 26 |10 - 11:30 a.m. ET

Walls’ biography of Thoreau explores the wide range of talents and accomplishments of this significant 19th century intellectual, philosopher, social reformer, businessman and, naturalist, who helped shape our national identity. Thoreau’s range of interests and accomplishments extends beyond his legendary tenure at Walden Pond.

Instructor(s):
Jennifer Caplan
Mondays, June 21 - July 19 |10 - 11:30 a.m. ET

The Marx Brothers, Nichols and May, Gilda Radner, Seinfeld, and more. In this class, we will have fun with these, and other, important figures in American Jewish humor. Each week we will look at performances from a different time period, starting in the 1930s and continuing into the 2020s.

Instructor(s):
James Newlin
Tuesdays, June 22 - July 27|1 - 2:30 p.m. ET

There have always been myths about “The Wild Man,” that figure who exists outside of society, as a kind of living rebuttal to the values of the “civilized” world. These stories are rich social documents that illuminate how a culture defines itself in relation to those that it excludes or fears.

Instructor(s):
Barbara Greenberg
Tuesdays, June 22 - July 13|10 - 11:30 a.m. ET

This course will look at the life of former Vice President Spiro Agnew through the eyes of Rachel Maddow. Maddow’s book follows Agnew’s career first, as Governor of Maryland; then as Richard Nixon’s Vice President; and finally, his fall from power.

Instructor(s):
Terri Mester
Thursdays, June 24 - July 29|1-2:30 p.m. ET

In this course, we will read the best stories of major Anglo/American modernist writers, including Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, and others. Modernist storytellers were preoccupied with an emphasis on form, self-exile, the meaning of time, and nostalgia for a lost plentitude.

Instructor(s):
Patrick Moore
Wednesdays, June 30 - August 4|1:30-3 p.m. ET

With World War I behind them, Americans lived it up in the 1920s. The energy and creativity unleashed ten brilliant years, making great strides in music, technology, the movies, and radio. Celebrity culture was invented Babe Ruth made baseball the national pastime Lindbergh flew over the pond, and women finally could vote.

Instructor(s):
Ted Smith
Thursdays, July 1 - August 5|1:30-3 p.m. ET

While prevalent today, salt was once one of the world’s most sought-after commodities. It was a substance so valuable it served as currency, influenced trade routes and the establishment of cities, provoked and financed wars, secured empires, and inspired revolutions.

Instructor(s):
Betty Zak
Tuesdays, July 6–27|1:30-3 p.m. ET

Join Queen Elizabeth I, her swashbuckling mariners, and devious spies as they use double agents and codes to lay the foundation for pirating and international espionage. Discover the location of Drake’s lost gold, search for Eldorado, and outwit the Spanish Armada. What was the secret to her success?

Instructor(s):
Assaf Boker
Tuesdays, July 6 - August 24|1:30-3 p.m. ET

No need to pack your bags, you can enjoy an 8-week tour of Israel from the comfort of your couch. Israeli tour guide, Assaf Boker, will walk you through the most popular and interesting sites in Jaffa, Nazareth, Caesarea, Capernaum, Mount of Beatitudes and Magdala, the Golan Heights, Jerusalem, Masada and Tzippori.

Instructor(s):
Bill Plevan
Wednesdays, July 7 - 28 |1:30-3 p.m. ET

This accessible new biography explores key moments in the life of the twentieth-century philosopher Martin Buber (1878–1965), one of the most influential Jewish thinkers of our time.

Instructor(s):
Timothy Wutrich
Thursdays, July 8 - 29|10 - 11:30 a.m. ET

In this course, we will read and discuss five plays by Aristophanes, the earliest comic playwright whose works survive in European literature. Aristophanes was a native Athenian who wrote and staged his plays during the time usually seen as the Golden Age of Greek civilization. Yet, in this period the fortunes of Athens changed dramatically.

Instructor(s):
Kevin A. Risner
Mondays, July 12 - August 16|4-5:30 p.m. ET

This course will explore the concept of existentialism as it formed into being in the early to mid-20th century in Europe right before and during WWII.

Instructor(s):
Angela Fasick
Tuesdays, July 13 - August 17|10 - 11:30 a.m. ET

In Howard’s End, E.M. Forster famously wrote, “Only Connect!” In this course, we’ll explore ways to write about one of our favorite connectors: Love.

Instructor(s):
Monica Carol Miller
Fridays, August 6 - 27|10 - 11:30 a.m. ET

In this course, we will read and discuss the range of Welty’s fiction, from her modernist family romances to her myth- infused photorealism. Readings of her short fiction will be supplemented by Welty’s own photographs and her commentary on the craft of writing.

Instructor(s):
Jodi Maile Kirk (Director of Active Learning) and Heather Meeker (Executive Director) from The Musical Theater Project
Tuesdays, August 3 - 31|1:30-3:30 p.m. ET

From classic Hollywood musicals like Singin’ in the Rain to Broadway gold like Anything Goes and Guys and Dolls, to irreverent contemporary musicals like Book of Mormon and Something Rotten, musical comedy has lifted our spirits and made us laugh for more than a century.

Instructor(s):
Gila Silverman
Wednesdays, August 4-18|1:30-3 p.m. ET

Born in the Land of Israel around the year 50 C.E., Rabbi Akiva was raised in poverty and began to learn the Torah only as an adult. In the aftermath of the destruction of Jerusalem by the Romans in 70 C.E., he helped shape a new direction for Judaism.

Instructor(s):
Judy Okun
Thursdays, August 5 - 26|10 - 11:30 a.m. ET