Literature & Writing

Instructor(s):
Monica Carol Miller
Fridays, August 6 - 27|10 - 11:30 a.m. ET

In this course, we will read and discuss the range of Welty’s fiction, from her modernist family romances to her myth- infused photorealism. Readings of her short fiction will be supplemented by Welty’s own photographs and her commentary on the craft of writing.

Instructor(s):
Cindy Sabik
Thursdays, September 9 - October 14|10:30 a.m. - noon ET

Boundary-breaking, beloved, revered, misunderstood, Emily Dickinson remains one of the foremost geniuses of American poetry. In this course, we will explore a range of Emily Dickinson’s poetry.

Instructor(s):
Kristin Stasiowski
Wednesdays, September 15 - September 29|5-6:30 p.m. ET

This course will introduce readers to the major themes of The Decameron, set against the historical backdrop of the 1348 plague. Set in Florence, Italy during the Black Death, Giovanni Boccaccio’s one hundred novelle have received recent, widespread attention as readers the world over struggle to navigate the perils of the COVID 19 pandemic.

Instructor(s):
Linda Tuthill
Tuesdays, September 21 - November 2|1-3 p.m. ET

The arms of creative nonfiction open wide to include many possibilities based on the truth of our lives and times and our particular angle of vision. Work read in class receives careful attention from class members who give helpful feedback.
 

Instructor(s):
Paula Kalamaras
Tuesdays, September 21 - November 9|10:30 a.m. - noon ET

Rediscover the Greek myths and legendary heroes through the witty analysis of scholar, comedian and author Stephen Fry. His books retell the stories of the gods and heroes in all their glories and foibles with humor and sympathy.

Read: Mythos, Stephen Fry; Heroes, Stephen Fry

Instructor(s):
Linda Tuthill
Thursdays, September 23 - November 4|1-3 p.m. ET

Writing poetry enhances our ability to see the miraculous in the ordinary and to capture the wonder that surrounds us, often unnoticed. Poetry also serves as a container for sorrow or joy. Poems shared in class receive constructive feedback.

Bring 12 copies of an original poem to the first class.
 

Instructor(s):
Earl Leiken
Fridays, September 24 - November 12|10:30 a.m. - noon ET

The 1920s was a unique period in American and world history. In this country, it was characterized by the end of the Progressive period with its significant social and political advances and a “return to normalcy” with Harding, Coolidge and Hoover in the White House.

Instructor(s):
Sylvia F. Abrams
Wednesdays, October 6 - 27 |10:30 a.m. - noon ET

Recently several popular books are serving up masterful plots set in libraries. These settings are found not only in historical fiction, fantasy, romances, sci-fi, and mysteries, but in nonfiction accounts, too. This course will take the reader into the stacks as we consider three best sellers.

Instructor(s):
Monica Carol Miller
Mondays, October 18 - November 22|3-4:30 p.m. ET

When Pulitzer-Prize winning author Donna Tartt published her first novel, The Secret History, in 1992, it was the subject of both hype and acclaim, breaking records both in the advance Tartt received for it as well as the number of copies in its first run.