Literature and Writing

Instructor(s):
John Orlock & Daniel Goldmark
Wednesdays, January 31-April 18|1:30–3:30 p.m.

Through a combination of close reading, critical analysis, and research inquiry, the class will navigate a rigorous exploration of what makes The Tragical History of Hamlet Prince of Denmark – a play over four hundred years old – the enduring drama that it is? 

Instructor(s):
Barbara Parr
Mondays, March 19-May 7|1-2:30 p.m.

This book discussion course examines George Orwell’s classic 1984, which is, perhaps, more relevant today than it was when published in 1948. Discussions focus on the literary merit of the novel as well as the cultural, philosophical, and political topics Orwell includes.

Instructor(s):
Bill Pennington
Tuesdays, March 20-May 8 |10-11:30 a.m.

Obviously, this 100-year-old classic by British author Kenneth Grahame appeals to all generations. But according to two, recently-published, annotated versions and an Oxford World Classics special edition, The Wind in the Willows was really written for adults.

Instructor(s):
Barbara Parr
Thursdays, March 22-May 10|10-11:30 a.m.

This book discussion course examines George Orwell’s classic 1984, which is, perhaps, more relevant today than it was when published in 1948. Discussions focus on the literary merit of the novel as well as the cultural, philosophical, and political topics Orwell includes.

Instructor(s):
Cheryl Wires
Thursdays, March 22-May 10 |10–11:30 a.m.

T.S. Eliot praised The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins as “the first…and the best of modern English detective novels.” Literary critics concur, crediting Collins, along with Edgar Allan Poe, with creating the detective genre.

Instructor(s):
Bill Pennington
Thursdays, March 22-May 10|10-11:30 a.m.

Obviously, this 100-year-old classic by British author Kenneth Grahame appeals to all generations. But according to two, recently-published, annotated versions and an Oxford World Classics special edition, The Wind in the Willows was really written for adults.

Instructor(s):
Joe Konen
Fridays, March 23-May 11|10:30 a.m.-noon

This book offers us a vehicle for a nuanced understanding of Islam. Carla Power, a Western reporter who grew up in several predominantly Muslim countries, writes of her dialogues with prominent India-born and now London-based Sheikh Mohammad Akram Nadwi. The dialogue enlightens us on a nonviolent understanding of Islam.

Instructor(s):
Andrea Peck
Tuesdays, April 10–May 1|6:30-8 p.m.

"There is no greater agony than bearing an untold story inside you." - Maya Angelou

Instructor(s):
Susan Kisch
Thursdays, April 12–May 17|1–3 p.m.

G’day. Australia is a world away and its official language is English but its history, identity, natural environment and indigenous cultures are different from the American experience. In this course, we will examine these diversities and how they are expressed in short stories.

Instructor(s):
Sylvia Abrams
Fridays, April 13-May 4|2-3:30 p.m.

Count Alexandar Rostov has been sentenced to house arrest in Moscow’s Metropol Hotel by a Bolshevik tribunal. How Rostov constructs a meaningful life is the center of Amor Towles best-selling novel, A Gentleman in Moscow.

Instructor(s):
Sylvia Abrams
Mondays, April 23-May 14|1:30-3:30 p.m.

Rachel Kalish weaves an extraordinary mystery in The Weight of Ink, when Helen Watt, an ailing scholar of Jewish history, is asked to examine a treasure trove of seventeenth-century documents apparently untouched for three centuries in an old London house. Watts and her assistance, Aaron Levy, are an unlikely pair of literary detectives.

Instructor(s):
Linda Tuthill
Tuesdays, May 1-June 5|1–3 p.m

The class will share memories that have been distilled and shaped into memoir.

Located in the Kutina Classroom

Instructor(s):
Linda Tuthill
Wednesdays, May 2-June 6 |1–3 p.m.

The class will share memories that have been distilled and shaped into memoir.

Located in the Kutina Classroom

Instructor(s):
Linda Tuthill
Thursdays, May 3–June 7|1–3 p.m.

Poets develop the habit of paying close attention to the world around them and look for fresh ways of seeing and connecting images. Bring 15 copies of a poem to the first class.

Located in the Pink Pig.

Instructor(s):
Peggy Wertheim
Tuesdays, May 8-29|1–4 p.m.

Discover, create and explore the exciting techniques of Batik and Silk Painting inspired by the natural beauty of Squire Valleevue Farm.

Limited enrollment. A materials fee of $35 is payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

Located in the Honey House

Instructor(s):
Barbara Parr
Wednesdays, May 9-May 30|7-8:30 p.m.

To Kill a Mockingbird is a masterpiece of American literature that speaks to our current time as poignantly as it did in 1960. This work continues to be banned from school reading lists due to its controversial subject material.

Instructor(s):
Patricia Sigmier
Fridays, June 1-29|10 a.m.–2 p.m.

In this course, we will explore painting in the outdoors using watercolor or the medium of your choice. Students of all skill levels, including beginners, are welcome. Each student will be instructed individually and work at his/her own pace. Bring a bag lunch.

Limited Enrollment

Instructor(s):
Cheryl Wires
Wednesdays, June 13-27|7-8:30 p.m.

In this three-week series, we’ll discuss The Gentle Subversive, Mark Hamilton Lytle’s account of Rachel Carson’s life and lasting legacy. By writing Silent Spring, this woman scientist reluctantly challenged the 1960s establishment regarding pesticide use.