Literature & Writing

Instructor(s):
Darlene Montonaro
Tuesdays, January 08-January 29|10 a.m.-noon

Showing up to write isn’t half the battle – it is the battle. This class will help you develop writing habits that will boost your confidence, help you find your "voice," and keep your writing process in motion.

Instructor(s):
Terry Meehan
Thursdays, January 17–March 7|10:30 a.m.-noon

Three of the top espionage writers of the mid-twentieth century were well acquainted with the secret world of spycraft. Both Ian Fleming and John le Carré were spooks for British Intelligence, while Len Deighton lived next door to Anna Wolkoff, a Nazi mole whose arrest he witnessed.

Instructor(s):
Linda Tuthill
Wednesdays, January 23-March 6|1–3 p.m

Creative nonfiction comes in many shapes and sizes and covers topics as varied as basketball and band practice. Class members respond to prompts and share writing with class members who listen closely and give constructive feedback.

Instructor(s):
Linda Tuthill
Thursdays, January 24-March 7|1–3 p.m.

Allen Ginsberg claimed "The only thing that can save the world is the reclaiming of the awareness of the world. That is what poetry does." 

Instructor(s):
Daniel Melnick, Lecturer in SAGES, Case Western Reserve University & Ben Sperry, Lecturer in SAGES, Case Western Reserve University
Thursdays, January 31-April 18|1:30-3:30 p.m.

From the Renaissance to the Modern: How Literature and Music Connect

January 31-March 7 | 1:30-3:30 p.m.

Lecturer: Daniel Melnick, Lecturer in SAGES, Case Western Reserve University

Instructor(s):
Thomas Yantek
Fridays, February 01–March 22|10:30 a.m.-noon

It is probably no exaggeration to refer to Homer’s epic work, The Odyssey, as the ur-story in Western literature: the opus from which, in one form or another, all subsequent literary work has sprung. Somewhat like Moby Dick, however, Homer’s tale may rank among the least-read classic works of all time (in its entirety, at any rate).

Instructor(s):
Lee Chilcote
Fridays, February 01-February 22|10 a.m.-noon

Learn the fundamentals of writing personal essays, including turning memories into stories, establishing yourself as a character, and using tools like scene and dialogue to make your writing more compelling, and establishing your own truth.

Instructor(s):
Charlene Mileti
Tuesdays, February 05-26|2-3:30 p.m.

This four-part discussion focuses on the award-winning book: Citizen: An American Lyric, by Claudia Rankine. Through her poetic narrative, Ms. Rankine invites and entreats the reader to consider life through her personal and objective experience of being black in America. The grave truths beautifully laid bare by Ms.

Instructor(s):
Linda Tuthill
Tuesdays, April 23-May 28|1-3 p.m.

Class members write memoir, essays or other forms of nonfiction and bring work to share with the group. Careful listening and response to pieces read in class.

Instructor(s):
Linda Tuthill
Wednesdays, April 24-May 29|1-3 p.m.

Class members write memoir, essays or other forms of nonfiction and bring work to share with the group. Careful listening and response to pieces read in class.

Instructor(s):
Linda Tuthill
Thursdays, April 25-May 30|1-3 p.m.

The poet Naomi Shihab Nye begins a poem with these words: “Before you know what kindness really is / you must lose things.” Poetry is a way to share both depths and heights. Bring 15 copies of a poem you have written to the first class.

Instructor(s):
Carol Salus
Mondays, April 29–May 20|1-2:30 p.m.

Depicting the Holocaust and narrating the events around it raise difficult moral and philosophical conundrums. Yet, artists, photographers and architects have not shied away from the challenge.

Instructor(s):
Anthony Wexler
Wednesdays, May 08-May 29|10-11:30 a.m.

This seminar considers the work of two of America’s most celebrated Jewish literary figures, who represent very different strands of American Jewish writing. Philip Roth’s assimilated characters seem cut off from the wellspring of Jewish identity, and even actively rebel against the tradition.