Literature & Writing

Instructor(s):
Janice Vitullo
Mondays, April 20-June 1 (please note new dates)|10 - 11:30 a.m.

In this course, students will be exposed to Latin poetry in its original language through a guided translation of the story of the marriage of Peleus and Thetis from Catullus’s “mini-epic” poem 64. Prose can be read in translation with little loss; poetry, on the other hand, loses a great deal in translation.

Instructor(s):
Janice Vitullo
Fridays, April 24-May 29 (please note new dates)|10 - 11:30 a.m.

This class will consist of directed readings and in-depth discussions of Plato’s Republic.  Although it is one of the most influential texts in human history, the Republic is seldom read today except for excerpts such as the Alleg

Instructor(s):
Angela Fasick
Tuesdays, May 12-June 16|10 - 11:30 a.m.

Do you have a memoir in the bottom drawer of your desk? A folder on Google Drive with ideas for essays? Would you like to? This course will introduce you to two of the many forms of creative nonfiction: essay and memoir.

Instructor(s):
Angela Fasick
Thursdays, May 28-June 18|10 - 11:30 a.m. EST

Written in 1850 but set in the Massachusetts Bay Colony during the 1640s, Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter is both moral tale and mystery. Full of symbolism and imagery, the novel explores Puritan New England through the life of Hester Prynne and her daughter Pearl.

Instructor(s):
Marion Boyer
Wednesdays, June 3-July 1|1-3 p.m.

Story, Structure, Music, and Imagination are what Gregory Orr calls the natural temperaments of writers, and each writer has one of these temperaments that comes easily to us, is nearly instinctive, is the strength we lean into when we write.

Instructor(s):
Barbara Burgess-Van Aken
Tuesdays, June 9-30|noon-2 p.m. EST

A theme that Shakespeare often explores in his plays is illusion vs. Reality. What makes it hard to distinguish between the two? What happens when characters perceive illusions as real? How do characters create illusions? What does it take for a character to see through an illusion?

Instructor(s):
Janice Vitullo
Fridays, June 19-July 24|10 - 11:30 a.m. EST

Socrates was condemned to death in 399 BCE by his fellow Athenian citizens. He left no writings of his own, but his student Plato describes his trial and execution in these four Socratic dialogues: Euthyphro, Crito, Apology and Phaedo.

Instructor(s):
Paula Kalamaras
Thursdays, June 25-July 16|10 - 11:30 a.m. EST

This course will study the mythologies of the world contrasting their differences and also the commonalities that all societies share. The text by Roy Willis and Robert Walker divides the mythologies of the world into regions and zones, providing a background for the discussion.

Instructor(s):
Steve Pinkerton
Tuesdays, July 7 - August 11|1-3 p.m. EST
Instructor(s):
Timothy Wutrich
Tuesdays, July 7-28 |9:30 - 11:30 a.m. EST

This course will focus on selected plays written by Aeschylus, the earliest tragedies to survive in European literature. Aeschylus preferred to write plays that were thematically connected, such as The Oresteia, which deals with the homecoming of Agamemnon from the Trojan War.

Instructor(s):
Paula Kalamaras
Thursdays, July 23-August 13|10 - 11:30 a.m. EST

Part two of this two-part series will study the mythologies of the world contrasting their differences and also the commonalities that all societies share. The text by Roy Willis and Robert Walker divides the mythologies of the world into regions and zones, providing a background for the discussion.

Instructor(s):
Darlene Montonaro
Wednesdays, August 5-26|10 a.m. - noon

Showing up to write isn’t half the battle – it is the battle. This class will help you develop writing habits that will boost your confidence, help you find your "voice," and keep your writing process in motion.