Literature & Writing

Instructor(s):
Earl Leiken, Former Mayor of Shaker Heights
Wednesdays, September 04-November 13|1:30-3:30 p.m.

The American Local Community: Its Role and Its Challenges

Instructor(s):
Karen Laurence
Fridays, September 13-November 8|10 - 11:30 a.m.

This course offers a guided reading of Homer’s great epic poem, The Iliad. Participants will have the opportunity to engage in analysis and discussion of various aspects of the poem, including style, historical context, and the poem’s significance within the literary canon.

Instructor(s):
Cheryl Wires
Mondays, September 16-November 4|2-3:30 p.m.

Wilkie Collins created the very first detective to appear in a novel-length mystery, Sergeant Cuff in The Moonstone (1868).  Cuff is called to an English country house to investigate the disappearance of a sacred diamond.  Charles Dickens began a rival tale with the Mystery of Edwin Drood (1870).

Instructor(s):
Phyllis Asnien
Tuesdays, September 17-November 5|1-2:30 p.m.

An insightful memoir seen from the author’s inevitable modulation through time.  Oates is a sensitive time traveler; for her, memory serves a transcendental function.

Instructor(s):
Linda Tuthill
Tuesdays, September 17-November 5 (no class Oct 8)|1-3 p.m.

Creative nonfiction covers a wide range of possibilities from memoir to sports or travel writing. Come share a slice of your life or passion for a pursuit you care about.

Instructor(s):
Linda Tuthill
Wednesdays, September 18-November 6 (no class Oct 9)|1-3 p.m.

Creative nonfiction covers a wide range of possibilities from memoir to sports or travel writing. Come share a slice of your life or passion for a pursuit you care about.

Instructor(s):
Terry Meehan
Thursdays, September 19-November 14 (no class Oct 10)|10:30 a.m. - noon

Two of Britain’s most celebrated writers are E.M. Forster (1879-1970) and Kazuo Ishiguro (born 1954). Both Forster’s Howard’s End and Ishiguro’s Remains of the Day are considered two of twentieth century’s finest British novels.

Instructor(s):
Linda Tuthill
Thursdays, September 19-November 7 (no class Oct 10)|1-3 p.m.

The poet Steven Leveni claims, The saddest part of being human is not paying attention. Presence is the gift of life. Writing poetry helps focus our attention, and together we learn how to see.

Bring 12-15 copies of a poem you have written to the first class.

Instructor(s):
Paula Kalamaras
Tuesdays, September 24-November 12|10 - 11:30 a.m.

For as long as human beings have had language, they have had myths.  Mythology is our earliest form of literary expression and the foundation of all history and morality. 


Book: The World of Myth, David Leeming

Instructor(s):
Linda Goodman Robiner
Wednesdays, October 02 - 30|10 a.m.-noon

This workshop will provide a window into important times in your life: how it was to grow up in your home, to survive adolescence, what made you who you are. This journey will help you reflect on your life. Simple exercises and prompts will lead you to write to short vignettes.

Instructor(s):
Paula Kalamaras
Sundays, October 06-November 24|5-6:30 p.m.

For as long as human beings have had language, they have had myths.  Mythology is our earliest form of literary expression and  the foundation of all history and morality. 

Book: The World of Myth, David Leeming

Instructor(s):
D.M. Pulley
Wednesdays, October 09, October 23 and November 06|6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

Reader Series classes will cover three books in a short period of time, taking you on a deep dive into specific topic or author to gain a more advanced understanding of literature and the world.

Instructor(s):
Sue Kisch
Thursdays, October 10-November 14|1-3 p.m.

How does it feel to age? Do the changes to our bodies and psyches come as a shock, as a challenge, or as natural processes? Join the conversation as we explore the issues of growing older as portrayed in the short stories of such writers as Saul Bellow, Joyce Carol Oates, Grace Paley, V.S. Pritchett and many others.

Instructor(s):
Marion Boyer
Wednesdays, October 30 - November 20|1-3 p.m.

Writing in the voice of a persona offers a special creative opportunity to adopt the personality, history, diction and obsessions of someone (or something!) other than yourself.

Instructor(s):
Michelle R. Smith
Saturdays, November 02-16|10 a.m.-noon

Reader Series classes will cover three books in a short period of time, taking you on a deep dive into specific topic or author to gain a more advanced understanding of literature and the world.

Instructor(s):
John Richards
November 04-25|3 - 5 p.m.

Euripides, the most 'modern' of the ancient Greek playwrights, examines human flaws as well as noble actions and regularly challenges the assumptions of his audience. In this course, we will read and discuss four of his plays that confront various societal norms: Iphigenia at Aulis, Medea, Hippolytus, and Bacchants.

Instructor(s):
Darlene Montonaro
Wednesdays, November 06 - December 04|1:30-3:30 p.m.

Showing up to write isn’t half the battle – it is the battle. This class will help you develop writing habits that will boost your confidence, help you find your "voice," and keep your writing process in motion.

Instructor(s):
Darlene Montonaro
Wednesdays, November 6-December 4|10 a.m.-noon

Showing up to write isn’t half the battle – it is the battle. This class will help you develop writing habits that will boost your confidence, help you find your "voice," and keep your writing process in motion.