Senior Scholars

Senior Scholars is an 11-week program that meets three afternoons per week and features academic lectures by university faculty and local experts on a variety of topics. While the format is lecture style, the afternoons are informal and interactive with an opportunity to ask questions and discuss the topics of the day. 

The registration options are listed here by the day, or with cost savings by registering for the full semester or the full year.

Register for the full year (Spring courses not yet listed)

Register for the full semester (includes all 6 courses listed below)

Register for Tuesdays (2 courses, listed below)
Register for Wednesdays (2 courses, listed below)
Register for Thursdays (2 courses, listed below)

Senior Scholars is supported by a generous gift from the Jane and Jon Outcalt Foundation.


TUESDAYS

TECHNOLOGY IN HISTORY (REMOTE)
Alan Rocke, Distinguished University Professor and Henry Eldridge Bourne Professor Emeritus, CWRU
Tuesdays, September 7-October 5 | 1:30-3 p.m. ET
Technology is more than just computers and the internet. Consider, for example, the sophisticated ability to make and manage fire in the neolithic, the manufacturing of steel weapons or the construction of graceful aqueducts in Roman antiquity, or the building of magnificent cathedrals in the middle ages. At its most basic level, technology forms the material basis of human life, and it has a rich and important – and neglected! – history. This course will present case studies in the history of technology, from its origins in antiquity to the contemporary era of social media and Google. In the process we will explore its role in world history and its multifarious impacts on our lives today.

UNDERSTANDING CHINA: RELATIONS AT HOME AND ABROAD (REMOTE)
Paul Schroeder, Visiting Assistant Professor, Political Science, CWRU
Tuesdays, October 12-November 16 | 1:30-3 p.m. ET
Americans’ lack of understanding of China puts us in a dangerous situation that could have serious repercussions for the future of U.S.-China relations. This course explores the changes and continuities between traditional and modern China to aid our understanding of a country that has become a serious challenge to American primacy.
Suggested Reading: Governing China: From Revolution to Reform, Kenneth Lieberthal; The Rise of Modern China, Immanuel Hsu

REGISTER HERE FOR TUESDAYS


WEDNESDAYS

THE ART AND ARCHAEOLOGY OF THE ROMAN EMPIRE (REMOTE) 
Leah Long, Independent Scholar
Wednesdays, September 8-October 6 | 1:30-3 p.m. ET
From the ascension of its first emperor, Augustus, the Roman empire thrived from the 1st century BCE until its collapse in the 5th century CE. While the city of Rome was a bastion of art, architecture, and culture, cities throughout the Empire thrived with exciting cosmopolitan influences. This course will begin with an overview of the major monuments of imperial Rome and a look at the role propaganda played in the imperial family. We will then shift our focus to the role of cities in the eastern Roman Empire, specifically Aphrodisias, where Dr. Long excavated for many years. The course will end with a case-study on Roman infrastructure through a look at the marble quarrying industries of the Roman Empire. 
 

INTRODUCTION TO HINDUISM: FROM ANCIENT SCRIPTURES TO CONTEMPORARY DEVOTION (REMOTE)
Deepak Sarma, Professor of Religious Studies, CWRU
Wednesdays, October 13-November 17 | 1:30-3 p.m. ET
We will survey the basic beliefs and practices of Hinduism(s) as found in India and across the world, with an emphasis on primary sources and contemporary complexities. Our study will range from close readings of classical texts, to observing and reflecting on contemporary practices and movies, to careful study of images and artifacts on display at the Cleveland Museum of Art. Students will gain the ability to explain and analyze Hindu events or images through the classical texts.

REGISTER HERE FOR WEDNESDAYS


THURSDAYS


VIVE LA FRANCE!: 17TH AND 18TH CENTURY FRENCH ART (REMOTE)
Catherine Scallen, Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the Humanities, Associate Professor of Art History, CWRU
Thursdays, September 9-October 7 | 1:30-3 p.m. ET
What is a great yet underappreciated period of French art? Hint: it occurs between the Gothic era and the 19th century. In this course we will consider a number of great painters, architects, and sculptors working in France in the 17th and 18th centuries, up to the time of the French Revolution. Topics will include the rise of France to dominance in the European art world the palace of Versailles as symbol of Louis XIV and model for other European rulers the increasing importance of the open art market and of secular art the rise of women as patrons and painters.

HUMANS' PLACE IN NATURE: WHO WE ARE AND HOW WE GOT THIS WAY (REMOTE)
Scott Simpson, Professor, Anatomy, School of Medicine, CWRU
Thursdays, October 14-November 18 | 1:30-3 p.m. ET
Modern humans are distinctive among mammals as we walk on two legs, live in complex societies, manipulate the world through technology and plant and animal domestication, and communicate through symbols- based language. While our behaviors and anatomy seem natural to us now, the origins and circumstances of these adaptations have a complex and interesting history. In this class, we will review the basic principles of Darwinian evolution, include a survey of the living mammals with an emphasis on primates, and we will review the fossil evidence for human evolution that will include discussing recent and unexpected advances in the field.

REGISTER HERE FOR THURSDAYS


Location: Landmark Centre – Beachwood


Senior Scholars course cost for the full year:
Member of Lifelong Learning cost: $393 | Nonmember: $434

Senior Scholars course cost for the full fall semester:
Member of Lifelong Learning cost: $264 | Nonmember: $293

Senior Scholars course cost for one day per week:
Member of Lifelong Learning cost: $130 | Nonmember: $151