Origins Science Scholars

Picture of asteroids in space

The Origins Science Scholars Program is presented by Siegal Lifelong Learning and the Institute for the Science of Origins (ISO), a partnership of several Northeast Ohio research and educational institutions, led by Case Western Reserve University.

In this unique program, members of the community engage with each other and with leading scholars to investigate rapidly developing areas of origins science. Each evening begins with a presentation by a world-class researcher, followed by complimentary dinner and open discussion among all of the participants.

Lecturer(s):
Isaiah Nengo, Harsh Mathur, Nandini Trivedi, Yohannes Haile-Selassie, Peter Harte, & Fred Turek
Lectures run April - May|5:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m

During this unique program, community members engage with one another and with leading scholars to investigate rapidly developing areas of origins science. Each evening begins with a presentation by a world-class researcher, followed by complimentary dinner and open discussion among all the participants.

Lecturer(s):
Yohannes Haile-Selassie
April 24, 2018|5:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m

Famed paleoanthropologist Yohannes Haile-Selassie is internationally celebrated for his unique ability to understand our primate ancestors.

Lecturer(s):
Nandini Trivedi
May 01, 2018|5:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m

How do electrons and atoms get organized at very low temperatures and how do new phases of matter emerge? Even a very small attraction between electrons in a metal can cause pairs of them to bind together, achieving unusually low energy. These pairs are responsible for superconductivity -and a Nobel Prize in physics!

Lecturer(s):
Harsh Mathur
May 8, 2018|5:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m

Extreme materials are more and more in the news. We hear about breakthroughs in "superconductors" and now "superfluids." Due to the marvels of quantum mechanics, in a superconductor, resistance drops to zero when the material is cooled below a critical temperature. Superfluids flow with absolutely no viscosity, and so no loss of energy.

Lecturer(s):
Peter Harte
May 15, 2018|5:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.

2017's Nobel Prize in Physiology/Medicine was awarded for discovering how fruit flies sleep!

Lecturer(s):
Fred Turek
May 22, 2018|5:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.

Is sleep a manifestation of the mind or the brain? Genes interact in complex ways to regulate circadian rhythms and these complexities affect our health in unforeseen ways. The neurochemical, molecular, and cellular events involved arise from a central biological clock located in the brain's hypothalamus.

Lecturer(s):
Kingman Strohl
May 29, 2018|5:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m

It seems paradoxical that with life as precarious as it is, humans spend a third of their lives out of touch with their surroundings. How could such a thing evolve? Even weirder, a few species have evolved the ability to sleep with one half their brain at a time so the other half remains awake to keep an eye out for predators.