Off-Campus Studies

Courses are eight weeks long and meet in locations across Greater Cleveland. There are no written assignments or exams; instead, the classes provide an open environment for lively discussion based on meaningful examination of shared texts.

Instructor(s):
Joe Konen
Thursdays, January 9-March 5|10 - 11:30 a.m.

The story of the gene is one of the great mystery narratives of science. In this book, Pulitzer Prize-winning author, Siddhartha Mukherjee, weaves together the history of genetics with his family’s history of mental illness.

Instructor(s):
Pat Moore
Sundays, January 12-March 1 |5-6:30 p.m.

In this course, we will review the foundations of US citizenship and discuss how our founders expected us, the American people, to properly fulfill our citizenship role.

Instructor(s):
Paula Kalamaras
Mondays, January 13-March 2|1-2:30 p.m.

This course will study the works of Jane Austen which are known to be funny, insightful, and immortal. Books: Pride and Prejudice, Persuasion, and Northanger Abbey, Jane Austen

Instructor(s):
Pamela Belknap
Mondays, January 13-March 2 |10 - 11:30 a.m.

Doris Kearns Goodwin’s book is a fascinating study of the leadership styles of four U.S. Presidents: Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin D. Roosevelt , and Lyndon B. Johnson. Learn how each overcame personal challenges and rose to lead the nation at times of crisis in unique ways. Supplemental materials will be provided.

Instructor(s):
Barbara Greenberg
Tuesdays, January 21-March 10|10 - 11:30 a.m.

This course will examine how Wil Haygood’s book reveals Lyndon B. Johnson’s masterful political talent in getting Thurgood Marshall appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Book: Showdown, Wil Haygood

Instructor(s):
Ted Smith
Tuesdays, January 14-March 3|1-2:30 p.m.

Dietrich Bonhoeffer was a German theologian who came of age between the two World Wars. His writings reflect increasing alarm as he watched his fellow Germans believe the lies of the National Socialists. The book documents his ultimate decision to participate in the plot to assassinate Hitler. What message does it hold today?

Instructor(s):
Pat Moore
Tuesdays, January 14-March 3 |1-2:30 p.m.

In this course, we will review the foundations of US citizenship and discuss how our founders expected us, the American people, to properly fulfill our citizenship role.

Instructor(s):
Ted Smith
Thursdays, January 16-March 5 |10:30 a.m. - noon

This course examines a unique historical perspective centering on a mineral, a rock, a seasoning. Prevalent today thanks to modern geology, salt was one of the world’s most sought-after commodities. A substance so valuable it served as currency, influenced trade routes and establishment of cities.

Instructor(s):
Jim Lane
Thursdays, January 16 – March 5|10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

With regard to Western civilization, all roads do indeed lead to Rome. Mary Beard, the esteemed classicist at Cambridge University, takes us on a journey to the heart and soul of Rome, from its inception in 753 BC, through its Republican phase, and into its Imperial age -- nearly a thousand year span of triumph and tragedy, success and strife.

Instructor(s):
Pamela Belknap
Fridays, January 17-March 6 |10 - 11:30 a.m.

Doris Kearns Goodwin’s book is a fascinating study of the leadership styles of four U.S. Presidents: Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin D. Roosevelt , and Lyndon B. Johnson. Learn how each overcame personal challenges and rose to lead the nation at times of crisis in unique ways. Supplemental materials will be provided.

Instructor(s):
Earl Leiken
Fridays, January 17-March 6 |10:30 a.m. - noon

This course will begin with a review of basic economic concepts and then apply this foundation to a discussion of the economic challenges facing the nation. Starting with a discussion of the views of major economic thinkers, we will then discuss concepts that are critical to an understanding of basic economics.

Instructor(s):
Terry Meehan
Mondays, January 20-March 9 |10:30 a.m. - noon

E.M. Forster’s Howard’s End and Kazuo Ishiguro’s Remains of the Day are considered two of the twentieth century’s finest British novels by two of Britain’s most celebrated writers.

Instructor(s):
Barbara Greenberg
Wednesdays, January 22-March 11|10:30 a.m. - noon

Every civilization deals with the health and welfare of the community. Reproductive rights are just one part of that large issue.