Off-Campus Studies

Instructor(s):
Charlene Miletti
Sundays, March 18-May 6|5-6:30 p.m.

Maurizio Viroli brings to life the fascinating writer of The Prince, who was the founder of modern political thought.

Instructor(s):
Jim Lane
Mondays, March 19-May 7|1-2:30 p.m.

Delve into the realms of science, mythology, spirituality, appearance, illusion, and reality as they apply to our place in the natural world. The two novels we will read explore profound personal, societal, philosophical and religious questions. Books: Siddhartha, Herman Hesse; Ishmael, Daniel Quinn

Instructor(s):
Whitney Lloyd
Mondays, March 19-May 7|10:30 a.m.-noon

McCullough’s biography of Harry S. Truman explores the life of the accidental president, who was the architect of the Cold War and an innovative reformer.

Book: Truman, David McCullough

Instructor(s):
Barbara Greenberg
Mondays, March 19-May 7|10-11:30 a.m.

Jodi Picoult’s novel Small Great Things focuses on racial tensions in a small hospital that flood out into the larger community.

Instructor(s):
Barbara Parr
Mondays, March 19-May 7|1-2:30 p.m.

This book discussion course examines George Orwell’s classic 1984, which is, perhaps, more relevant today than it was when published in 1948. Discussions focus on the literary merit of the novel as well as the cultural, philosophical, and political topics Orwell includes.

Instructor(s):
Bill Pennington
Tuesdays, March 20-May 8 |10-11:30 a.m.

Obviously, this 100-year-old classic by British author Kenneth Grahame appeals to all generations. But according to two, recently-published, annotated versions and an Oxford World Classics special edition, The Wind in the Willows was really written for adults.

Instructor(s):
Jim Lane
Tuesdays, March 20-May 8|1-2:30 p.m.

Put on your bell-bottoms and grab your granny glasses, tie-dyes and beads! Let’s do a little back-to-the-future time travel to the seminal decade of the 1960s. Utilizing a compilation of articles originally published in the New Yorker, we will re-examine the confrontations over civil rights, economics, Vietnam, and lifestyles.

Instructor(s):
Barbara Greenberg, Leader-Teacher, Off-Campus Studies
Tuesdays, March 20-May 8|10-11:30 a.m.

Using the United States Constitution and the Bill of Rights as our text, each class focuses on these treasured words and related landmark United States Supreme Court cases to illustrate how the decisions affect our daily lives.

Instructor(s):
Barbara Greenberg
Tuesdays, March 20-May 8|7:30-9 p.m.

Jodi Picoult’s novel Small Great Things focuses on racial tensions in a small hospital that flood out into the larger community.

Instructor(s):
Betty Zak
Wednesdays, March 21-May 9|10–11:30 a.m.

The Vatican and others called her a Pirate Queen and a master of the spies as she transformed England into an imposing empire. Discover her power and intrigue, her swashbuckling mariners who terrorized the seas and the brilliance of a spymaster who exploited double agents, deciphered codes, and laid a foundation for international espionage. 

Instructor(s):
Sol Factor
Thursdays, March 22–May 10|2–3:30 p.m.

The team of Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II totally changed the American Musical both in structure and also how difficult subject matter was to be presented. They were not afraid to deal with subject matter ranging from inter-racial relationships, abusive husbands, racial prejudices, to Nazi takeovers.

Instructor(s):
Bill Pennington
Thursdays, March 22-May 10|10-11:30 a.m.

Obviously, this 100-year-old classic by British author Kenneth Grahame appeals to all generations. But according to two, recently-published, annotated versions and an Oxford World Classics special edition, The Wind in the Willows was really written for adults.

Instructor(s):
Barbara Parr
Thursdays, March 22-May 10|10-11:30 a.m.

This book discussion course examines George Orwell’s classic 1984, which is, perhaps, more relevant today than it was when published in 1948. Discussions focus on the literary merit of the novel as well as the cultural, philosophical, and political topics Orwell includes.

Instructor(s):
Charlene Mileti
Thursdays, March 22-May 10|1:30-3 p.m.

In the fifth century, Athens, Greece, was a burgeoning democracy, the first of its kind to exist in human history. Born in 494 BCE, Pericles of Athens would rise to become one of the city's most beloved leaders.

Instructor(s):
Jim Van Horn
Fridays, March 23-May 11|10-11:30 a.m.

One hundred thousand years ago at least six species inhabited earth. Today, just one. Us. Homo Sapiens. How did our species succeed in the battle for dominance? Create cities and kingdoms?

Instructor(s):
Joe Konen
Fridays, March 23-May 11|10:30 a.m.-noon

This book offers us a vehicle for a nuanced understanding of Islam. Carla Power, a Western reporter who grew up in several predominantly Muslim countries, writes of her dialogues with prominent India-born and now London-based Sheikh Mohammad Akram Nadwi. The dialogue enlightens us on a nonviolent understanding of Islam.