Off-Campus Studies

Courses are eight weeks long and meet in locations across Greater Cleveland. There are no written assignments or exams; instead, the classes provide an open environment for lively discussion based on meaningful examination of shared texts.

Instructor(s):
Joe Konen
Thursdays, January 10-March 7 |10-11:30 a.m. (No class Feb 14)

In our unique genomes, every one of us carries the story of our species--births, deaths, disease, war, famine, migration, and a lot of sex. But those stories have always been locked away--until now. Geneticists have suddenly become historians, and the hard evidence in our DNA has blown the lid off what we thought we knew.

Instructor(s):
Whitney Lloyd
Mondays, January 14–March 04|10:30 a.m.-noon

This class will examine a chaotic period of British history following the death of Queen Elizabeth I. We will explore the reign of the Stuart monarchs, James I, and his son, Charles I, followed by the Civil War and Interregnum under Oliver Cromwell’s leadership, climaxing in the execution of Charles I.

Instructor(s):
Jim Lane
Mondays, January 14-March 4|10:30 a.m.-noon

Relive the intense struggle of Michelangelo in his restless search for Truth and Beauty. Set in the turbulent world of 14th and 15th century Italy with its plotting princes, warring popes, brilliant artists and authors, there is indeed a new awakening which reshapes the future of Europe and Western civilization.

Instructor(s):
Pamela Belknap
Mondays, January 14-March 04|10-11:30 a.m.

Two new biographies present fresh, contemporary perspectives on hero Winston Churchill and his wife, Clementine, who was indispensable to his life and important to Great Britain.  Discuss their unique personalities, fascinating marriage, and critical contributions to their nation.  Compare and contrast with the lives of the Roosevelts.  

Instructor(s):
Pat Moore
Tuesdays, January 15-March 5|10–11:30 a.m.

In this course we will engage in a discussion and review of the foundations of US citizenship and how our founders expected us, the American people, to properly fulfill our citizenship role.

Instructor(s):
Jim Lane
Tuesdays, January 15–March 05|2-3:30 p.m.

With regards to Western civilization, all roads do indeed lead to Rome. Mary Beard, the esteemed classicist at Cambridge University, takes us on a journey to the heart and soul of Rome, from its inception in 753 BC, through its Republican phase, and into its Imperial age— nearly a thousand-year span of triumph and tragedy, success and strife.

Instructor(s):
Jim Van Horn
Tuesday, January 15-March 5|1-2:30 p.m.

David McCullough’s book is “history on a grand scale – a book about politics and war and social issues, but also about human nature, love, religious faith, virtue, ambition, friendship, and betrayal, and the far-reaching consequences of noble ideas.”

Book: John Adams, David McCullough

Instructor(s):
Pamela Belknap
Thursdays, January 17–March 07|10-11:30 a.m.

As a young social worker, Frances Perkins witnessed the traumatic Triangle Shirtwaist fire of 1911, which killed 146 workers. She immediately became an activist, as well as a lifelong advocate for critical reforms and programs. Learn
how Labor Secretary Perkins teamed with FDR to create the New Deal legislation, which continues today. 

Instructor(s):
Terry Meehan
Thursdays, January 17–March 7|10:30 a.m.-noon

Three of the top espionage writers of the mid-twentieth century were well acquainted with the secret world of spycraft. Both Ian Fleming and John le Carré were spooks for British Intelligence, while Len Deighton lived next door to Anna Wolkoff, a Nazi mole whose arrest he witnessed.

Instructor(s):
Charlene Mileti
Thursdays, January 17-March 7|10:30 a.m.-noon

"... A magisterial account of Rome and its remarkable ascent from an obscure agrarian backwater to the greatest empire the world has ever known." The reader is not only witness to the fascinating birth of Rome, but also its inevitable decline.

Instructor(s):
Pamela Belknap
Fridays, January 18-March 08|10-11:30 a.m.

Two new biographies present fresh, contemporary perspectives on hero Winston Churchill and his wife, Clementine, who was indispensable to his life and important to Great Britain.  Discuss their unique personalities, fascinating marriage, and critical contributions to their nation.  Compare and contrast with the lives of the Roosevelts.  

Instructor(s):
Pat Moore
Fridays, January 18-March 08|10:30 a.m.-noon

In this course we will engage in discussion and review of the foundation of U.S. citizenship and how our founders expected us, the American people, to properly fulfill our citizenship role.

Instructor(s):
Barbara Greenberg
Mondays, January 21-March 11|1-2:30 p.m.

In this timely look at the confirmation process, Wil Haygood’s book reveals Lyndon B. Johnson’s masterful political talent in getting Thurgood Marshall appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court. 

Book: Showdown, Wil Haygood

Instructor(s):
Barbara Greenberg
Tuesdays, January 22-March 12|1-2:30 p.m.

In this timely look at the confirmation process, Wil Haygood’s book reveals Lyndon B. Johnson’s masterful political talent in getting Thurgood Marshall appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court. 

Book: Showdown, Wil Haygood

Instructor(s):
Barbara Greenberg
Wednesdays, January 23-March 13|1-2:30 p.m.

In this timely look at the confirmation process, Wil Haygood’s book reveals Lyndon B. Johnson’s masterful political talent in getting Thurgood Marshall appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Book: Showdown, Wil Haygood.

Instructor(s):
Thomas Yantek
Fridays, February 01–March 22|10:30 a.m.-noon

It is probably no exaggeration to refer to Homer’s epic work, The Odyssey, as the ur-story in Western literature: the opus from which, in one form or another, all subsequent literary work has sprung. Somewhat like Moby Dick, however, Homer’s tale may rank among the least-read classic works of all time (in its entirety, at any rate).