Skip to Main Content
CWRU Links
Siegal Lifelong Learning

Upcoming Events

Upcoming Events

September 2017

Monday, September 25 | 7-8:30 p.m.

 

Panelists: Meryl Johnson, Member, Board of Education

Peggy Lehner, Ohio Senator (R-6) Chair, Senate Standing Committee on Education

Mary Rose Oakar, Former Member, Board of Education

 

The purpose of this program is to let parents and the entire community know what the State Board of Education does, its relationship to the Ohio legislature and most importantly, how the public can help our elected officials, on both the State School Board and the legislature be more effective.

 

Co-sponsored by the League of Women Voters of Greater Cleveland, Advance Ohio, Cuyahoga County Public Library, Lakewood Public Library, Cleveland Heights-University Heights Public Library, Solon Community Center, and corporate sponsor, First Interstate Properties, Ltd.

 

Shaker Public Library Main Branch | Free (advanced registration recommended | REGISTER >

Wednesday, September 27 | 7-8:30 p.m.

 

Panelists: Christin Farmer, Executive Director, Birthing Beautiful Communities

Dr. Arthur R. James, The Ohio State Univ., Interim Exec Director Kirwin Institute, Nationwide Children’s Hospital

Angela Newman White, Supervisor, Maternal and Child Health Program, Cuyahoga County Board of Health

Moderator: Brie Zeltner, The Plain Dealer

 

Ohio has one of the worst levels of infant mortality in the entire country. How is this possible and what is being done to improve survival rates. The discussion promises to be thoughtful and reflective of current policy and new thinking for future initiatives.
 

Co-sponsored by the League of Women Voters of Greater Cleveland, Advance Ohio, Cuyahoga County Public Library, Lakewood Public Library, Cleveland Heights-University Heights Public Library, Solon Community Center, and corporate sponsor, First Interstate Properties, Ltd.

 

Cleveland Heights-University Height Public Library | Free (advanced registration recommended) | REGISTER >

 

October 2017

Monday, October 2 | noon–1:30 p.m.

 

Darin Croft, Professor, Anatomy, School of Medicine

 

Recorded history extends back fewer than 10,000 years, but humans have achieved a detailed knowledge of what life was like stretching back hundreds of millions of years. This is a truly astonishing achievement, much of it made possible by the science of paleontology. While many of us are accustomed to reading reports of new fossil discoveries, the science behind such discoveries is largely a mystery, as are the many other types of studies paleontologists undertake. Join Dr. Darin Croft, author of the award-winning book Horned Armadillos and Rafting Monkeys: The Fascinating Fossil Mammals of South America, to learn about the nature of the forensic investigative work conducted by paleontologists, how scientists go about painting a picture of an ancient ecosystem, and the value that a deep-time perspective provides society today. 

Judson Park | Lifelong Learning Members: $25; Nonmembers: $30 (includes lunch) | REGISTER >

Sunday, October 8 | 10 a.m.

Ori Soltes, Professor, Georgetown University

 

The interpenetration of sports and religion is as old as history and as wide as geography. The angles of interpenetration have been diverse - from the Bible to the Iliad and the Aeneid, from gladiatorial contests to the Crusades to chess, from the Mayan game pok-a-pok to Lacrosse to contemporary NBA championship games. Moreover, the sports/religion matrix has always been interwoven with politics (from which religion has rarely strayed), war (for which sports has always offered a surrogate) and art (which captures so much of this in words and images, from Greek vase paintings to contemporary films). Give this subject an hour and you will never watch a game the same way again.


Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: $5; Nonmembers: $10 | Advance registration required - Light breakfast included | REGISTER >

Monday, October 9 | 9:15 a.m - 2 p.m.

 

Moderator: John Grabowski, Professor of History, CWRU, and Historian and Senior Vice President for Research and Publications, Western Reserve Historical Society

Speakers: Sinan Ciddi, Executive Director, Institute of Turkish Studies, Georgetown University and Ori Z. Soltes, Professor of History, Georgetown University

 

This timely event focuses on the background and internal and external ongoing events in Turkey today.

 

Mayfield Sand Ridge Country Club | ACE Members: $35; Nonmembers: $45 | REGISTER >

Kevin Adelstein‌Monday, October 16 | 7-8:30 p.m.

 

Tribe Talk is an edgy, informative, and engaging monthly conversation on trending Jewish news led by Brian Amkraut and Alanna Cooper, our resident Jewish news-junkies.

 

Featured Guest of the Month: Kevin Adelstein, President, Publisher & CEO Cleveland Jewish Publication Co./Cleveland Jewish News 

Moderators: Brian Amkraut, Executive Director, Siegal Lifelong Learning and Alanna Cooper, Director of Jewish Lifelong Learning, CWRU

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members & Nonmembers: Free (advanced registration recommended) REGISTER >

 

Co-sponsored by the Cleveland Jewish News and the CJN Foundation

Tuesday, October 17 | 6:30-8 p.m.

 

Panelists: Tom Bier, Ph.D, Senior Fellow, Maxine Goodman Levin College of Urban Affairs, Cleveland State University

Barbara A. Langhenry, Director of Law, City of Cleveland

Thomas Suddes, Columnist, Cleveland.com/Columbus Dispatch/Dayton Daily News

Michael Summers, Mayor, City of Lakewood

Moderator: Tom Beres, WKYC-TV emeritus

 

This forum will cover the pros and cons of an issue that impacts Northeast Ohio communities almost every day. Who has the right to control laws regarding such issues as Gun Control, Fracking, Police, School(s). Should it be local communities? Or should the Ohio legislature set the laws for your city? In addition, some have argued that strong Home Rule laws in Ohio have contributed to sprawl and other public policy that may be damaging to Northeast Ohio as a whole.

 

Co-sponsored by Lakewood Public Library, Cleveland.com/Plain Dealer, League of Women Voters–Greater Cleveland, Case Western Reserve University Siegal Lifelong Learning Program

 

Lakewood Public Library - Main | Free (advanced registration recommended) | REGISTER >

 

Wednesday, October 18 | 7 p.m.

 

Alex Jassen, Associate Professor of Hebrew andJ udaic Studies and Director of Graduate Studies in the Skirball Department of Hebrew and Judaic Studies at New York University

 

Have you ever wondered what the Dead Sea Scrolls are and why there is so much controversy surrounding them? In this lecture, Professor Alex Jassen reveals what they are, where they come from, when they were composed and why they have become scandalous.


Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: free; Nonmembers: $5 | Advance registration required | 

REGISTER >

 

Thursday, October 19 | 10 a.m.

 

Alex Jassen, Associate Professor of Hebrew and Judaic Studies and Director of Graduate Studies in the Skirball Department of Hebrew and Judaic Studies at New York University

 

In this lecture, Professor Alex Jassen examines the exciting insights that the Dead Sea Scrolls continue to offer 70 years after their discovery. This lecture explores how the Dead Sea Scrolls contribute to our understanding of the Bible's origins, the growth of Judaism and emergence of Christianity.

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: free; Nonmembers: $5 | Advance registration required | 

REGISTER >

Thursday, October 19 | 7 p.m.

 

Moderator: Vince Carrafi, Chair of the Cuyahoga County Opiate Task Force, Cuyahoga County Board of Health

Panelists: Mark Singer, Leonard W. Mayo Professor of Family and Child Welfare at the Mandel School of Applied Sciences, Deputy Director of the Semi J. and Ruth W. Begun Center for Violence Prevention Research and Education and Co-Director of the Center on Substance Abuse and Mental Illness, CWRU;

Tony Weis, Detective, Cuyahoga Metropolitan Housing Authority Police Dept. and Sergeant, Village of Grand River Police Dept.

 

Nothing is on an officer’s belt to help them deal with the multitude of social issues they face as first responders, yet 80 % of their time is spent on dealing with people in need of a range of services including counseling and safe housing. Designated by the US Department of Justice as “a promising initiative,” the Police Assisted Referral Program (PAR) addresses this shortcoming and trains officers, giving them the tools to help those in need. Whether domestic violence, housing or substance abuse is the issue, through PAR officers have the ability to refer people to programs that can help. Mark Singer and Detective Tony Weis explain how police officers from the Cuyahoga County Metropolitan Housing Authority Police Department are trained as “first social responders.

 

Landmark Centre | Free and open to the public | REGISTER >

Friday, October 20 | noon–1:30 p.m.

 

Kenneth Ledford, Chair of the Department of History, CWRU

 

After 65 successful years, the European Union faces multiple challenges, the common currency (the euro) continues to be threatened, and newer members increasingly deviate from the fundamental membership requirements of adhering to principles of democracy and the rule of law. At the same time, member states continue to stress the Union's benefits, and most young Europeans prove resistant to the siren call of nationalist populism. How can Americans grasp this unique political structure, even as our own key democratic traditions seem under attack?

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: $20; Nonmembers: $25 (includes lunch) | Advance registration required | REGISTER >

Sunday, October 22 | 2-3:30 p.m.

 

Diane F. Afoumado, Chief of the Research and Reference Branch at the Holocaust Survivors and Victims Resource Center, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

 

Learn about one of the largest Holocaust archives in the world, the International Tracing Service, (ITS), located in the Bad Arolsen, Germany. Dr. Afoumado will share how to use the ITS collection, housed in the United States at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, (USHMM) in Washington, D.C. Opened in 2007, the ITS digital collection contains about 200 million digital images of documentation such as: camp arrival lists, grave locations, transport lists, prisoner cards, forced labor lists, death lists, displaced person applications for assistance, deportation lists, emigration applications/questionnaires, registration and work cards, sometimes with photographs. The archive was established by the Allied powers after World War II to help reunited separated families and to trace missing family members. Dr. Afoumado will be available for a limited number of individual appointments to search ITS.

 

Laurel School - Lyman Campus | Lifelong Learning Members & Nonmembers: Free | REGISTER >

Diane Afoumado’s appearance is co-sponsored by the Jewish Genealogy Society of Cleveland, Kol Israel Foundation, Laurel School, Siegal Lifelong Learning Program of Case Western Reserve University and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. 

Monday, October 23 | 7 p.m.

 

Jonathan Schneer, Professor of History, Georgia Tech-Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts 

 

Exactly 100 years ago, Great Britain issued the Balfour Declaration, which promised to support the establishment of a national home for the Jewish people in Palestine. Professor Jonathan Schneer will explain why the British government made this vow and the historical impact of this commitment. British motives were not so straightforward as one might think.

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: free; Nonmembers: $5 | Advance registration required | 

REGISTER >

 

Tuesday, October 24 | 10 a.m.

 

Jonathan Schneer, Professor of History, Georgia Tech-Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts 

 

During World War II, Winston Churchill put together in his War Cabinet an extraordinary team of high-powered, ambitious, disputatious men. It was his own “team of rivals,” and he barely managed to keep it working together — and barely long enough. Professor Schneer will explain how the War Cabinet worked, and why it fell apart, and how that dissolution presaged Churchill’s startling defeat in the General Election of 1945.

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: free; Nonmembers: $5 (advanced registration recommended) |

REGISTER >

 

Tuesday, October 24 5:30 p.m.

 

Glenn Starkman, Professor of Physics and Astronomy; Director, Institute for the Science of Origins, CWRU 

 

For almost 100 years, we have built ever larger particle accelerators in order to probe shorter and shorter distances, with ever higher energy probes. With the discovery of the Higgs boson at the Large Hadron Collider, we have completed the Standard Model of particle physics. What's left to learn, and can we learn it from even bigger accelerators?

 

Program Schedule:
5:30 p.m. – Coffee and Sign-In
6 p.m. – Lecture
7 p.m. – Dinner with OSS faculty and fellows
7:30 p.m. – Q&A and Dessert

 

Cleveland Museum of Natural History | Lifelong Learning Members: $40; Nonmembers: $48 | REGISTER >

Tuesday, October 31 | 5:30 p.m.

 

Cyrus Taylor, Dean and Professor in Physics, CWRU

 

The detectors at modern particle accelerators are awe inspiring masterpieces of engineering weighing thousands of tons and requiring the coordinated effort of thousands of scientists and engineers at hundreds of universities and laboratories around the world. How do they work, how are they designed, built and operated?

 

Program Schedule:
5:30 p.m. – Coffee and Sign-In
6 p.m. – Lecture
7 p.m. – Dinner with OSS faculty and fellows
7:30 p.m. – Q&A and Dessert

 

Tinkham Veale University Center, CWRU campus | Lifelong Learning Members: $40; Nonmembers: $48 | REGISTER >

November 2017

Tuesday, November 7 | 5:30 p.m.

 

Mike Martens, Professor of Physics, CWRU 

 

Particle accelerators began almost a century ago as table-top apparatuses, and are now the world's largest machines, tens of miles long, crossing international borders, requiring whole power plants to operate.

 

Program Schedule:
5:30 p.m. – Coffee and Sign-In
6 p.m. – Lecture
7 p.m. – Dinner with OSS faculty and fellows
7:30 p.m. – Q&A and Dessert

 

Cleveland Museum of Natural History | Lifelong Learning Members: $40; Nonmembers: $48 | REGISTER >

Monday, November 13 | 7 p.m.

 

Oren Gutfeld, Archaeologist and Researcher at the Hebrew University’s Institute of Archaeology

 

The Dead Sea scrolls found in the 1940s offered groundbreaking new information about the history of the Hebrew Bible and the origins of Christianity. This past winter, archaeologist Oren Gutfeld discovered a new scroll cave. Although the contents were looted, jug-shards, textiles, and parchments that were left behind shed new light on an old and intriguing history.

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: free; Nonmembers: $5 | Advance registration required | 

REGISTER >

 

Tuesday, November 14 | 5:30 p.m.

 

Darin Croft, Associate Professor, Department of Anatomy, CWRU School of Medicine

 

Are humans causing global climate change? Or is nature cycling the planet toward a heat wave, just as it has had periods of heat and ice ages in the recent and distant past? The geologic record & earth dynamics explain the difference between the glacially slow climate change of the past vs today's radically-accelerated changes. In fact, the mechanics of it are pretty simple. Geologists understand very well what makes the earth hot and cold -today, and throughout the 4.5 billion year history of the planet. And they know the effects climate change has had on the planet's inhabitants: the most common response of species to major environmental change is extinction.

Participants will come away with a better understanding of the science involved, quite apart from the thorny questions of policy. However, the good news is that newly-emerging markets are making huge gains in clean energy, which not only curbs pollution but simultaneously helps counter climate change. Solar panels and wind turbines are already providing thousands of new jobs in Ohio.

 

Program Schedule:
5:30 p.m. – Coffee and Sign-In
6 p.m. – Lecture
7 p.m. – Dinner with OSS faculty and fellows
7:30 p.m. – Q&A and Dessert

 

Tinkham Veale University Center, CWRU campus | Lifelong Learning Members: $40; Nonmembers: $48 | REGISTER > 

Tuesday, November 14 | 10 a.m.

 

Oren Gutfeld, Archaeologist and Researcher at the Hebrew University’s Institute of Archaeology

 

When Jordan occupied Jerusalem’s Old City in 1948, the Hurvah Synagogue and Tiferet Israel Synagogue were bombed, leaving behind only rubble. In recent years, both sites have been excavated and rebuilt. Archaeologist Oren Gutfeld, who directed the dig at Tiferet Israel, presents the rich finds discovered on location, dating back to the Second Temple era.

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: free; Nonmembers: $5 (advanced registration recommended) |

REGISTER > 

 

Thursday, November 16 | 7 p.m.

 

Moderator: Vince Carrafi, Chair of the Cuyahoga County Opiate Task Force, Cuyahoga County Board of Health

Panelists: Mayor Merle Gorden, Beachwood;

Mayor Kathy Mulcahy, Orange Village;

Mayor Patrick Ward, Lyndhurst 


Join these local mayors of some of our Eastside communities to learn what is happening locally and how you can help with the growing issue of the substance abuse epidemic.

 

Landmark Centre | Free and open to the public | REGISTER >

This series is generously supported by the Melissa Rae Fund in Support of Substance Abuse Education, Advocacy and Change

Thursday, November 16 | 7-8:30 p.m.

 

Panelists:  TBD

Moderator: Andrew Tobias, Cleveland.com


2018 promises to be an interesting year for politics in Ohio. This panel will explore the major political races including campaigns for U.S. Senate, Ohio Governor, Secretary of State, Attorney General, Auditor, Treasurer and the state legislature.

 

Co-sponsored by the League of Women Voters of Greater Cleveland, Advance Ohio, Cuyahoga County Public Library, Lakewood Public Library, Cleveland Heights-University Heights Public Library, Solon Community Center, and corporate sponsor, First Interstate Properties, Ltd.

 

Cuyahoga County Public Library, Parma-Snow Branch | Free (advanced registration recommended) | REGISTER >

 

Friday, November 17 | noon–1:30 p.m.

 

Richard Block, Senior Rabbi at the Temple-Tifereth Israel

 

Join Rabbi Block, Senior Rabbi at The Temple-Tifereth Israel, as he reflects on how the Jewish landscape has changed throughout his career.

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: $20; Nonmembers: $25 (includes lunch) | Advance registration required | REGISTER >

Monday, November 20 | noon–1:30 p.m.

 

Arnold Hirshon, Associate Provost and University Librarian, CWRU

 

In the over 150 years since their first publication, Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass, have been visualized by well over 2,000 different illustrators from countries around the world, making it the most illustrated book in history. The books also have been the inspiration for many fine artists (such as Dali and Magritte), filmmakers, set decorators, and costume and fashion designers. These illustrations and designs are a social history of their times. With Carroll’s intricate word-play, the books have appealed to both adults and children, and changed literature – and the world of illustration – forever. Take this fascinating trip down the rabbit hole to see infinite perspectives on the way we see society today through the world of art and illustration, from the child-like to the surreal, from the beautiful to the sometimes bizarre.

 

Judson Park | Lifelong Learning Members: $25; Nonmembers: $30 (includes lunch) | REGISTER >

Dan Moulthrop‌Monday, November 20 | 7-8:30 p.m.

 

Tribe Talk is an edgy, informative, and engaging monthly conversation on trending Jewish news led by Brian Amkraut and Alanna Cooper, our resident Jewish news-junkies.

 

Featured Guest of the Month: Dan Moulthrop, CEO of City Club of Cleveland

Moderators: Brian Amkraut, Executive Director, Siegal Lifelong Learning and Alanna Cooper, Director of Jewish Lifelong Learning, CWRU

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members & Nonmembers: Free (advanced registration recommended) | REGISTER >

 

Co-sponsored by the Cleveland Jewish News and the CJN Foundation

Tuesday, November 21 | 5:30 p.m.

 

Michael Lewicki, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, CRUW and Ken Loparo, Professor of Engineering and Chairman, CWRU

 

The brain's interpretation of sensory info results in representation and understanding of the environment. Perception isn't passive, it’s shaped by learning, memory, expectation, and attention. It's evolution is the subject of considerable controversy. Can theories of optimality explain the codes biological systems use? Dr. Lewicki will argue that computational principles explain how neural codes are optimally adapted to their sensory environment. Further, it is possible to extend these theories to provide functional theories for higher-level aspects of perception.

 

Program Schedule:
5:30 p.m. – Coffee and Sign-In
6 p.m. – Lecture
7 p.m. – Dinner with OSS faculty and fellows
7:30 p.m. – Q&A and Dessert

 

Tinkham Veale University Center, CWRU campus | Lifelong Learning Members: $40; Nonmembers: $48 | REGISTER >

The Mind-Body Connection series is also sponsored by the Case Western Reserve University Emeriti Academy, an organization administered through the CWRU Office of the Provost, which is intended to foster closer continuing relationships with emeriti faculty after they retire from full-time employment.

 

Tuesday, November 28 | 5:30 p.m.

 

Roberto F. Galán and Ken Loparo, Professor of Engineering and Chairman, CWRU

 

Neural circuits are subject to sources of variability akin to static noise in electrical circuits. I will present several examples from my research, showing that unlike man-made devices, neural circuits have adapted not only to cope with different levels of noise but also to take advantage of that intrinsic variability and uncertainty to encode information, modulate neuronal activity, and transform behavior.

 

Program Schedule:
5:30 p.m. – Coffee and Sign-In
6 p.m. – Lecture
7 p.m. – Dinner with OSS faculty and fellows
7:30 p.m. – Q&A and Dessert

 

Tinkham Veale University Center, CWRU campus | Lifelong Learning Members: $40; Nonmembers: $48 | REGISTER >

The Mind-Body Connection series is also sponsored by the Case Western Reserve University Emeriti Academy, an organization administered through the CWRU Office of the Provost, which is intended to foster closer continuing relationships with emeriti faculty after they retire from full-time employment. 

December 2017

Sunday, December 3 | 4 p.m.

 

Ruta Vanagaite, Author and Journalist

 

When best-selling author and journalist Ruta Vanagaite discovered that her own relatives were complicit in the murder of Lithuanian Jews, she became determined to awaken the consciousness of her fellow country-men. Joining up with Efraim Zuroff, director of the Simon Wiesenthal Center, the two coauthored Musiskiai (Our People: Journey with an Enemy) which uncovers Lithuanians' war-time atrocities. Vanagaite discusses the controversy her work has stirred and the search for truth that it has inspired among many young Lithuanians.

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: free; Nonmembers: $5 (Advanced registration recommended) |

REGISTER >

 

Tuesday, December 5 | 5:30 p.m.

 

Howard Eichenbaum, Professor, Boston University

 

Memory for specific life experiences is characterized by recollection of the flow of events in time and space that compose specific episodes, and this ability depends on a brain area called the hippocampus. I will describe recent complementary evidence of “time cells” in the hippocampus that encode sequential moments in temporally structured experiences. Furthermore, networks of time cells represent the temporal organization of specific memories and predict memory success. In addition, we have traced the origin of timing signals to a cortical area that also carries signals about space to the hippocampus. Taken together, these findings support an emerging view that the hippocampus serves memory by mapping the organization of events within their temporal and spatial context, and to connect related memories in the building of knowledge. This capacity to map memories supports our ability to use memory for planning and insight in everyday life challenges.

 

Program Schedule:
5:30 p.m. – Coffee and Sign-In
6 p.m. – Lecture
7 p.m. – Dinner with OSS faculty and fellows
7:30 p.m. – Q&A and Dessert

 

Cleveland Museum of Natural History | Lifelong Learning Members: $40; Nonmembers: $48 | REGISTER >

The Mind-Body Connection series is also sponsored by the Case Western Reserve University Emeriti Academy, an organization administered through the CWRU Office of the Provost, which is intended to foster closer continuing relationships with emeriti faculty after they retire from full-time employment. 

Tuesday, December 5 | 7 p.m.

 

Daniel Goldmark, Professor, Head of Popular Music and Director of the Center for Popular Music Studies 

 

Beginning with the Disney studio’s very first feature, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937) to the current hit Frozen (2013), the Disney film has also been the Disney musical. As musical tastes have come and gone over the last eighty years, the studio's musical extravaganzas have become more and more popular, especially since the advent of the Disney stage musical, a live-action reimagining of an animated film. In this presentation we will explore the ups and downs of the Disney musical, from stage to screen and back again.

 

All ticket sales will be handled by the Beck Center for the Arts. If you wish to purchase tickets by phone, please call their Box OFfice at 216.521.2540 x10 or buy tickets online at http://bit.ly/SiegalDisneyLecture

 

Mackey Theatre, Beck Center for the Arts | Lifelong Learning Members: $8; Nonmembers: $12 | BUY TICKETS

Siegal members should use the code SIEGAL online in order to get the $8 Member pricing. If purchasing tickets by phone, mention if you are a Siegal Member to get the special pricing.

 

To view the Beck Center for the Arts' full theater season, go to: http://www.beckcenter.org/2017/04/27/2017-2018-theater-season/ and use discount code SIEGAL to recieve $5 off the adult and/or senior ticket prices for other productions.

Thursday, December 7 | 7 p.m.

 

Moderator: Vince Carrafi, Chair of the Cuyahoga County Opiate Task Force, Cuyahoga County Board of Health

Panelists: Russell Goodwin, LPC, LICDC, Founding board member, Sober Living Cleveland

Erin HelmsProgram Director for Sober Living Cleveland and Executive Director of The Woodrow Project

Kelly MeyersHouse Manager, Cedar House-Cleveland Heights

Too often people leaving treatment for substance abuse return to an unhealthy living situation. Recovery housing, often called sober housing, has existed for decades but only recently has it become recognized as vital support for successful recovery from the chronic disease of addiction. Locally, Sober Living Cleveland and The Woodrow Project have created safe, affordable homes for women that support recovery, provide living skills, and promote wellness. One of Cedar House's residents will round out this panel with her personal experience living in recovery housing.

 

Landmark Centre | Free and open to the public | REGISTER >

This series is generously supported by the Melissa Rae Fund in Support of Substance Abuse Education, Advocacy and Change

Monday, December 11 | noon–1:30 p.m.

 

Nathan Kruse, Associate Professor of Music Education and Coordinator of Graduate Studies in Music Education, CWRU

 

This session is designed to explore the ways in which music is processed cognitively, and how to apply this information to daily living, both individually and with others. Topics include music's effect on mood and well-being, how the brain processes the musical information it receives, and musical engagement across the lifespan.

 

Judson Park | Lifelong Learning Members: $25; Nonmembers: $30 (includes lunch) | REGISTER >

Monday, December 11 | 7-8:30 p.m.

 

Tribe Talk is an edgy, informative, and engaging monthly conversation on trending Jewish news led by Brian Amkraut and Alanna Cooper, our resident Jewish news-junkies.

 

Featured Guest of the Month: TBD

Moderators: Brian Amkraut, Executive Director, Siegal Lifelong Learning and Alanna Cooper, Director of Jewish Lifelong Learning, CWRU

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members & Nonmembers: Free (advanced registration recommended) | REGISTER >

 

Co-sponsored by the Cleveland Jewish News and the CJN Foundation

Friday, December 15 | noon-1:30 p.m.

 

Peter Whitehouse, Professor of Neurology, CWRU

 

Involving learners of all ages can enhance life-long education. Through topics like positive aging, brain health and inter-generational learning, we will identify how we create purposeful programs to support experiential learning and collective wisdom

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: $20; Nonmembers: $25 (includes lunch) | Advance registration required | REGISTER >

 

2018

Thursday, February 1 | 7 p.m.

 

Jeffrey Schein, director of the "Text Me: Ancient Jewish Wisdom Meets Contemporary Technology" project at the Covenant Foundation 

 

As early as 1967, Marshall McCluhan coined the term “global village” and - as though peeking into a crystal ball - he predicted the kind of communication we now experience as the World Wide Web. Thirty years later, Sherry Turkle, professor at MIT and poster-child of Wired magazine, also prophesized new forms of communication. More recently, though, her take on how we are being shaped by digital communication has turned dark and critical. Through video, discussion, and the wisdom of Jewish texts, this session addresses what we can learn from these two visionaries about the nature of wired communication today.

 

Landmark Centre | Lifelong Learning Members: free; Nonmembers: $5 | Advance registration required REGISTER >