Mark L. Joseph, PhD

Leona Bevis/Marguerite Haynam Associate Professor in Community Development
Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences
Founding Director
National Initiative on Mixed-Income Communities
Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences
Faculty Associate
Center on Urban Poverty and Community Development
Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences

Mark Joseph is the Leona Bevis/Marguerite Haynam Associate Professor of Community Development at the Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences at Case Western Reserve University and Founding Director of the National Initiative on Mixed-Income Communities. He received his Ph.D. from the Harris School of Public Policy at the University of Chicago. He was a Post-Doctoral Scholar at the School of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago and a Harlech Visiting Scholar at Oxford University. He received his undergraduate degree in Government from Harvard University.

Joseph’s research focus is mixed-income development as a strategy for addressing urban poverty. He is the co-author of the award-winning book Integrating the Inner City: The Promise and Perils of Mixed-Income Public Housing Transformation. His center, the National Initiative on Mixed-Income Communities, conducts research and consulting projects in Cleveland and around the country in cities that have included Austin, Chicago, Nashville, Pittsburgh, San Francisco, Seattle, Tulsa, and Washington, D.C. The center, which recently celebrated its fourth anniversary, is raising funds to be endowed as the Louise Cinthy Stokes Center on Inclusion and Equity.

Joseph is a member of the Board of Trustees of the George Gund Foundation and a member of an External Advisory Committee at the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. He is a member of the advisory board of the journal Cityscape, published by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. He is also on the editorial boards of the journal of Community Practice and Housing Policy Debate.

Biosketch
Curriculum Vitae
Google Scholar

Teaching Information

Courses Taught

SASS 411. Nonprofit Leadership Dialogues
SASS 470. Social Policy
SASS 569. Planning and Implementing Social Change

Research Information

Research Projects

The National Initiative on Mixed-Income Communities
at the Center on Urban Poverty and Community Development is a new resource for research and information about mixed-income communities.
Learn More About the Center

Mixed-Income Research

Creating mixed-income communities has become one popular policy response to the social isolation and economic and public sector disinvestment that characterize high-poverty neighborhoods in most urban areas. The objective is to attract residents with higher incomes while maintaining affordable and public housing for lower income residents. It is hoped that, through this strategy, housing developments and perhaps entire neighborhoods can be created that provide strong networks to employment and other resources beyond the neighborhood, more effective demand for high quality amenities and public services, and positive role models for youth.


Mixed-Income Development in Chicago: Case Studies

Description:
We know very little about the impact on residents of living in a mixed-income development, or of how they differ from public housing residents living in other housing circumstances. This research projects focuses on investigating the strategies and effectiveness of strategies used to build community in mixed-income developments, residents’ experiences in a mixed income development, and the impact of mixed-income developments on residents’ lives.

Research Grants:

  • John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation
  • Annie E. Casey Foundation
  • Ford Foundation/Heartland Alliance

Research Briefs:

  1. Building Community in Mixed-Income Developments Summary
  2. Living in a Mixed-Income Development: Resident Perceptions of Benefits and Disadvantages Summary
  3. The Nature of Social Interaction in Mixed-Income Developments Summary
  4. Whose Space? Whose Rules? Social Challenges in Mixed-Income Developments Summary
  5. Chicago’s Public Housing Transformation: What happened to the Residents? Summary
  6. Why Do So Few Residents Return to Mixed-Income Developments? Insights into Resident Decision-Making Summary

Jazz on the Boulevard Case Study

Description:
This research project is a long-term case study of Jazz on the Boulevard, one of the first planned mixed-income developments being created as part of the CHA ‘s 1999 Plan for Transformation. In-depth, qualitative interviews of residents, service providers and developers, and a comparison group of individuals describe what motivated residents to choose to live in a mixed-income development, their perception of the neighborhood ‘s role in their lives, how the development effects social capital, networks, and social organizations, and what roles various members of the community play.

Research Grants:

  • Rockefeller Foundation
  • Case Western Research University

Research Highlights:
Highlight 1: Movers versus non-movers: Who are they?
Highlight 2: The resident population at Jazz
Highlight 3: Understanding the choice to live at Jazz
Highlight 4: Resident perspectives on mixed-income development
Highlight 5: Early resident experiences: General satisfaction
Highlight 6: Early social relations at Jazz

Joseph, Mark. (2008) Early Resident Experiences at a New Mixed-Income Development in Chicago. Journal of Urban Affairs. 30:3, 229-257.


Mixed-Income Development in Chicago: Developer and Service Provider Perspectives

Description:
This research project is an investigation into possibilities and challenges faced by development teams in transforming public housing into mixed-income development communities.

Research Grants:
Rockefeller Foundation

Joseph, M. L. (2010). Creating mixed-income developments in Chicago: Developer and service provider perspectives. Housing Policy Debate, 20(1), 91–118.


Faith-Based Mentoring Demonstration Evaluation

Description:
The Federal Department of Housing and Urban Development selected the Chicago Housing Authority (CHA) as one of the three sites nationally to implement a mentoring demonstration program. The goal of this program is to test a means of providing additional support for public housing residents who have been relocated as part of a HOPE VI redevelopment by partnering residents with mentors who are recruited through faith-based and community-based organizations. This study seeks to determine the effectiveness of the program, explore experiences of participants, and the perspectives of mentors and staff members of participating institutions.

Research grants:
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development/Chicago Housing Authority

Recent Funding

Recent Grants

HOPESF Evaluation, San Francisco  
Principal Investigator
Learning For Action
$126,644
2012–2017

Choice Neighborhoods National Evaluation
Principal Investigator
The Urban Institute
$104,583
2012–2014

Building Effective and Sustainable Mixed‐Income Communities
Principal Investigator
Annie E. Casey Foundation
$50,000
2012–2013

Evaluation of Ways and Means at Cascade Village  
Co‐Principal Investigator (Co‐Principal Investigator: Robert Fischer)
Community Builders, Inc.
$253,000
2011–2014

NPI Organizational Assessment
Co‐Principal Investigator (Co‐Principal Investigators: Robert Fischer and Mark Chupp)
Neighborhood Progress Inc.
$28,000
2011–2012

Urban Strategies Data Integration
Co‐Principal Investigator (Co‐Principal Investigator:  Claudia Coulton)
Center for the Study of Social Policy
$80,000
2011

Building Mixed‐Income Communities: Documenting the Experience in Chicago
Principal Investigator   
The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation
$700,000 (MSASS Funding: $145,461)
2010–2013

Building Mixed Income Communities: Documenting the Experience in Chicago‐Early Lessons at Roosevelt Square.
Principal Investigator
Heartland Alliance, Ford Foundation
$200,000 (MSASS Funding:  $25,354)
2010–2011

Building Mixed Income Communities: Learning from the Chicago Experience
Principal Investigator
Annie E. Casey Foundation
$105,000
2009–2010

Building Mixed Income Communities: Documenting the Experience in Chicago
Principal Investigator
University of Chicago, Illinois, The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation
$600,000 (MSASS Funding:  $97,988)
2006–2010

Publications

Recent Publications

Joseph, M. L. (2013). "Is mixed-income development an antidote to urban poverty?" In Mueller, E. & Tighe, R. (Eds.), The affordable housing reader.  New York, NY: Routledge.  Reprint.

Joseph, M. L. (2013). Mixed-income symposium summary and response: Implications for antipoverty policy. Cityscape,  15 (2), 215-221.

Chaskin, R. J., Sichling, F. & Joseph, M.L. (2013). Youth in mixed-income communities replacing public housing complexes: Context, dynamics and response. Cities. 35, 423-31.

Chaskin, R. J., & Joseph, M. L. (2012). “Positive” gentrification, social inclusion, and the “right to the city” in mixed-income communities: Uses and expectations of space and place. International Journal of Urban and Regional Research., 37(2), 480-502. On-lline advance publication: DOI: 10.1111/j.1468-2427.2012.01158.x

McCormick, N., Joseph, M.L. & Chaskin, R.J. (2012) The new stigma of relocated public housing residents: Challenges to social identity in mixed-income developments. City and Community, 11(3), 285-308. On-lline advance publication: doi.org/10.1111/j.1540-6040.2012.01411.x

Chaskin, R.J., Khare, A.T., & Joseph, M.L. (2012).  Participation, deliberation, and decision-making:  The dynamics of inclusion and exclusion in mixed-income developments.  Urban Affairs Review,  48(6), 863-906.

Joseph, M. L., & Chaskin, R. J. (2012). Mixed-income developments and low rates of return: Insights from relocated public housing residents in Chicago. Housing Policy Debate, 22 (3),377-406.

Chaskin, R. J., Joseph, M. L., Voelker, S., & Dworsky, A. (2012). Public housing transformation and resident relocation: Comparing destinations and household characteristics in Chicago. Cityscape, 14 (1),183-214.

Joseph, M. L. (2011). "Reinventing older communities through mixed-income development: What are we learning from Chicago’s public housing transformation?" In H. B. Newberger, E.L. Birch, & S. M. Wachter (Eds.), Neighborhood and life changes: How place matters in modern America (pp. 122–139). Philadelphia, PA: Penn Institute for Urban Research.

Chaskin, R. J., & Joseph, M. L. (2011). Social interaction in mixed-income developments: Relational expectations and emerging reality. Journal of Urban Affairs, 33(2), 209–237.

Joseph, M. L. (2010). "Beyond “initiatives” for comprehensive community change: Is there a better way to seek impact and sustainability?" In A. C. Kubisch, P. Auspos, P. Brown, & T. Dewar (Eds.), Voices from the field (Vol. III, pp. 154–162), Washington, DC:  The Aspen Institute.

Joseph, M. L. (2010). Creating mixed-income developments in Chicago: Developer and service provider perspectives. Housing Policy Debate, 20(1), 91–118.

Joseph, M. L. (2010), "Understanding the economic costs of incarceration for African American males." In W. E. Johnson, Jr., (Ed.), Social work with African-American males: Health, mental health, and policy. New York, NY:  Oxford University Press.

Chaskin, R.J., & Joseph, M. L. (2010). Building “community” in mixed-income developments: Assumptions, approaches, and early experiences. Urban Affairs Review, 45(3), 299–335.

Chupp, M. G., & Joseph M. L. (2010). Getting the most out of service learning: Maximizing student, university and community impact. Journal of Community Practice, 18,190–212.

Joseph, M. L., &. Chaskin, R.J. (2010). Living in a mixed-income development: Resident perceptions of the benefits and disadvantages at two developments in Chicago. Urban Studies, 47(11), 2347–2366.

Smith, R. E., Kingsley, G. T., Cunningham, M. K., Popkin, S. J., Dumlao, K., Ellen, I. J., Joseph, M. L., &  McKoy, D. (2010). Monitoring success in choice neighborhoods: A proposed approach to performance measurement. Washington, DC: The Urban Institute.

Joseph, M. L., & Feldman, J. (2009). Creating and sustaining successful mixed-income communities: Conceptualizing the role of schools. Education & Urban Society. 41(6), 623–652.

Joseph, Mark. (2008) Early Resident Experiences at a New Mixed-Income Development in Chicago. Journal of Urban Affairs. 30:3, 229-257.

Presentations

Recent Presentations

Joseph, M.L. (March, 2013). Dynamics of Mixed-Income Communities. Office of Policy Development and Research Quarterly Housing Update, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Washington, D.C.

Fischer, R. L., Joseph, M. J., & Chupp, M. C. (October, 2012). Evaluation and learning in community change: Insights from a mixed-methods study of a mixed-income community in Akron. The Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences Research & Training Methods Colloquium, Cleveland, OH.

Joseph, M. L. (September, 2012). Mixed-Income development as a neoliberal policy experiment: New challenges to cross-sector collaboration. Presentation at the After the Crisis Housing Policy Conference, New York City, New York.

Education

Doctor of Philosophy
The University of Chicago
Master of Arts
The University of Chicago
Bachelor of Arts
Harvard University

Residency

Post-Doctoral Scholar
The University of Chicago
Visiting Scholar
Oxford University

Additional Information

Concentration:

  • Community Practice for Social Change
  • Masters of Nonprofit Organizations

Affiliations

  • Association for Community Organization and Social Administration
  • Council on Social Work Education
  • Urban Affairs Association
  • Society for Social Work Research
  • Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management

In the News

National Initiative on Mixed-Income Communities Now Formally Independent
September 19, 2018

Joseph’s Power of Diversity Lecture
by Mandel School on March 14, 2018

Joseph Named to George Gund Foundation Board of Trustees
by Mandel School on March 6, 2018

Joseph and Khare Present at Harvard University on March 2
by Mandel School on March 2, 2018