Training Grants

Department of Pathology Training Grants

The Department of Pathology has a robust set of NIH training grants to support its research training programs, including four T32 training grants based in the Department.  The Immunology Training Program T32 (Dr. Brian Cobb, PI) supports pre-doctoral training for PhD students in the Immunology Training Program.  The Cancer Biology Training Program T32 (Dr. Mark Jackson, PI), a collaboration with the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, supports both predoctoral training for PhD students in the Cancer Biology Training Program T32 and postdoctoral training in cancer research.  The T32 grant for Training in Neurodegenerative Diseases (Dr. Xiongwei Zhu, PI) supports predoctoral training for PhD students in the Molecular and Cellular Basis of Disease Training Program (and some collaborating programs) for students who are pursuing research in neurodegenerative diseases.  Thus, each of the three constituent Pathology PhD Program Tracks has an associated NIH training grant.  In addition, Training in Geographic Medicine and Infectious Diseases T32, based in the Center for Global Health and Diseases, supports postdoctoral fellows focusing on parasitic, bacterial, and viral infectious diseases.

Beyond these grants administered by the Department of Pathology, trainees may also be supported by numerous other training grants in the CWRU School of Medicine, including the Medical Scientist Training Program (Dr. Derek Abbott, Director and PI of the MSTP T32 grant) and the Clinical and Translational Scientist Training Program TL1 (Dr. Clifford Harding, Director and PI of the TL1 training grant).

For more information about each of these support mechanisms, please see the below.

 

Training in Geographic Medicine and Infectious Diseases, Center for Global Health and Diseases

The CWRU School of Medicine Geographic Medicine and Infectious Diseases post-doctoral NIH T32 training program began in 1976 and has been continuously funded since then. The purpose of our program is to i) teach the critical conceptual, technical and analytical skills needed for a successful and independent career in infectious disease research, ii) impart broad-based knowledge of host defense to infectious agents and the molecular mechanisms that underlie infection susceptibility and disease pathogenesis, particularly with respect to infectious diseases of great health significance in resource limited areas of the world, iii) promote training in areas that benefit from collaboration between clinical translational and basic scientists, iv) assist trainees in career development by providing guidance and mentoring in preparation of grant applications, research conceptualization and selection of the appropriate venues for funding