Defending Tomorrow's Democracy: The Future of Elections in the Era of Advanced Technology

Friday, September 20th, 2024
9:00 AM - 3:15 PM

Add to Calendar: Add to Calendar: 2024-09-20 09:00:00 2024-09-20 15:15:00 Defending Tomorrow's Democracy: The Future of Elections in the Era of Advanced Technology Event Description As the 2024 election comes into view, advanced technology is anticipated to have an unprecedented influence on voters before, during, and after they cast their ballots. While the risks of voter suppression, election manipulation, and misinformation predate advanced technology, a new capacity for instant generation, automation, and deception now gives a small number of bad actors the opportunity to undermine our democracy like never before. But as many states, federal agencies, and Congress begin to regulate, the First Amendment may stop lawmakers in their tracks. Given the nascent stage of these technologies, the boundaries of freedom of expression in this context remains relatively unexplored. This symposium will reveal the who, what, when, where, and why regarding advanced technology, election law, and the First Amendment. And as advanced technology continues to invade the 2024 election, what can we learn, who can be held responsible, and among other takeaways, how can we prepare for its inevitable use in the future. Speaker Biographies CLE Reading Materials Event Agenda 9-9:30 a.m. Welcome and introduction 9:30-11:15 a.m. Panel 1: Advanced Technology and Election Law Topics • Rebecca Green, William & Mary Law School • Ciara Torres-Spelliscy, Stetson University College of Law • Jacob Eisler, Florida State University College of Law • Dara Lindenbaum, Federal Election Commission 11:15-11:30 a.m. Break 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Keynote: The Surveilled Student—A Hindrance to Democracy • Danielle Citron, University of Virginia School of Law 12:30-1:15 p.m. Lunch Break 1:15-3 p.m. Panel 2: Advanced Technology in Elections: Free Speech or Defamation • Marc Blitz, Oklahoma City University School of Law • Ellen Goodman, Rutgers Law School • RonNell Andersen Jones, The University of Utah College of Law • Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky, University of Florida College of Law 3-3:15 p.m. Closing Remarks   Case Western Reserve University School of Law George Gund Hall Room A59, Moot Courtroom 11075 East Blvd., Cleveland, OH 44106   School of Law School of Law America/New_York public

To receive CLE credit, the cost is $100 for alumni and $200 for non-alumni.  CLE registration will be made available during the event.
 

4.0 hours of CLE credit, pending approval

Event Description

As the 2024 election comes into view, advanced technology is anticipated to have an unprecedented influence on voters before, during, and after they cast their ballots. While the risks of voter suppression, election manipulation, and misinformation predate advanced technology, a new capacity for instant generation, automation, and deception now gives a small number of bad actors the opportunity to undermine our democracy like never before. But as many states, federal agencies, and Congress begin to regulate, the First Amendment may stop lawmakers in their tracks. Given the nascent stage of these technologies, the boundaries of freedom of expression in this context remains relatively unexplored. This symposium will reveal the who, what, when, where, and why regarding advanced technology, election law, and the First Amendment. And as advanced technology continues to invade the 2024 election, what can we learn, who can be held responsible, and among other takeaways, how can we prepare for its inevitable use in the future.

Speaker Biographies

CLE Reading Materials

Event Agenda

9-9:30 a.m. Welcome and introduction
9:30-11:15 a.m. Panel 1: Advanced Technology and Election Law Topics
• Rebecca Green, William & Mary Law School
• Ciara Torres-Spelliscy, Stetson University College of Law
• Jacob Eisler, Florida State University College of Law
• Dara Lindenbaum, Federal Election Commission
11:15-11:30 a.m. Break
11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Keynote: The Surveilled Student—A Hindrance to Democracy
• Danielle Citron, University of Virginia School of Law
12:30-1:15 p.m. Lunch Break
1:15-3 p.m. Panel 2: Advanced Technology in Elections: Free Speech or Defamation
• Marc Blitz, Oklahoma City University School of Law
• Ellen Goodman, Rutgers Law School
• RonNell Andersen Jones, The University of Utah College of Law
• Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky, University of Florida College of Law
3-3:15 p.m. Closing Remarks

 

Event Location

Case Western Reserve University School of Law
George Gund Hall
Room A59, Moot Courtroom
11075 East Blvd., Cleveland, OH 44106
 

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